Searching for Wind Band Music? Visit the Wind Band Music Shop
We've found 11 matches for your search. Order by

Results

  • £50.00

    Psalm for all Nations (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

    -

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £50.00

    Psalm for all Nations - Ball, E

    In stock: Estimated dispatch 1-3 days

     PDF View Music

  • £39.95

    Judd: All the Nations

    September 2017 ReleaseAll the Nations (Roger Trigg)Originally written for the Melbourne Staff Band 125th Anniversary, the central theme of the music is from Psalm 86 verse 9. The tune is derived from 'Lobe den herren' before a setting of the tune 'St Peter' in a more reflective manner is presented. An invitation to worship as a group of Gods people is presented in the contemporary song 'Come, now is the time to worship' before the original material is presented and the tune 'St Peter' is heard in a full, exciting conclusion.

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £39.95

    All the Nations (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Trigg, Roger

    Originally written for the Melbourne Staff Band 125th Anniversary, the central theme of the music is from Psalm 86 verse 9. Thetune is derived from 'Lobe den herren' before a setting of the tune 'St Peter' in a more reflective manner is presented. An invitationto worship as a group of God's people is presented in the contemporary song 'Come, now is the time to worship' before the originalmaterial is presented and the tune 'St Peter' is heard in a full, exciting conclusion.

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £19.95

    All the Nations (Brass Band - Score only) - Trigg, Roger

    Originally written for the Melbourne Staff Band 125th Anniversary, the central theme of the music is from Psalm 86 verse 9. Thetune is derived from 'Lobe den herren' before a setting of the tune 'St Peter' in a more reflective manner is presented. An invitationto worship as a group of God's people is presented in the contemporary song 'Come, now is the time to worship' before the originalmaterial is presented and the tune 'St Peter' is heard in a full, exciting conclusion.

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £21.50

    Repton (Dear Lord & Father of Mankind) - Charles Parry - Gavin Somerset

    Featured numerous times on BBC 1's "Songs Of Praise", this hymn tune setting by Charles Parry (of Jerusalem fame) has become a nations favourite, heard throughout the country. This arrangement uses all the colours of the brass band to bring out Parry's stunning melody, building all the way though to a big warm climax that will send chills down the spines of your audience. Perfect for church occasions, and as a general concert item.

    In stock: Estimated dispatch 1-3 days

     PDF View Music

  • £21.50

    Ding Dong Merrily On High - Darrol Barry

    Euphonium players will relish the chance this Christmas to perform one of the nations most loved Christmas carols in a solo skilfully penned by Darrol Barry. Marked 'Giocoso' in style, this jolly arrangement not only allows the soloist the chance to show off their virtuosic capabilities, but the band has plenty to enjoy too. A darker middle movement precedes an exciting finale which will have the audiences cheering. A must have for all euphonium soloists. For Christmas 2020, we have made backing tracks of this title for you to download. These can be used either for personal playback use, or to create a virtual performance of the piece with your full band. To download the backing track, please RIGHT CLICK HERE & Save As .

    In stock: Estimated dispatch 1-3 days

     PDF View Music

  • £99.99

    The Divine Right (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Harper, Philip

    At the time of composing this piece, the Arab Spring was sweeping through the Middle East. It seemed that almost every week a new country's people had risen up against the regimes and dictatorships which had prevailed for generations, leaving many nations at a defining crossroads in their history. There were so many possible ways ahead: so many hopes, yet so many uncertainties.This music is a depiction of these revolutionary times, and several musical themes are in turn presented, discussed, considered, fought over, altered, rejected or accepted.Most nations have had, or probably will have, their own Arab Spring, including the United Kingdom. Events of 17th Century Britain provide the context for this piece, particularly those following the execution of the tyrant King Charles I on 30 January 1649. The regicide was in part due to Charless steadfast belief in the Divine Right of Kings, and led to a tumultuous interregnum, where England stood at its own defining crossroads. The music begins turbulently, before King Charles appears and is led to the gallows outside Banqueting House in central London where he is brutally decapitated. From the assembled crowd rose, according to one observer,a moan as I never heard before and desire I may never hear again.The music descends to emptiness.The musical argument which follows is not strictly programmatic, but a number of musical themes are all thrown into the melting pot, representing ideas such as: religion; military force; reasoned Parliamentary debate; and the chattering, irrepressible voice of the people. Additionally, there are some quotations from the music of royalist composer Thomas Tomkins (1572-1656), who was often in tune with the feeling of the times.This defining episode in England's history was brought to a close with the Restoration of the monarchy in 1660, and as the exiled King Charles II rode back into London the diarist John Evelyn wrote:Never was so joyful a day seen in this nation. I stood in the Strand and beheld it, and blessed God.At the end of the piece the bells ring out, and the musical appearance of the King has transformed from turbulent to triumphant.Duration: 17.00

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £39.95

    The Divine Right (Brass Band - Score only) - Harper, Philip

    At the time of composing this piece, the Arab Spring was sweeping through the Middle East. It seemed that almost every week a new country's people had risen up against the regimes and dictatorships which had prevailed for generations, leaving many nations at a defining crossroads in their history. There were so many possible ways ahead: so many hopes, yet so many uncertainties.This music is a depiction of these revolutionary times, and several musical themes are in turn presented, discussed, considered, fought over, altered, rejected or accepted.Most nations have had, or probably will have, their own Arab Spring, including the United Kingdom. Events of 17th Century Britain provide the context for this piece, particularly those following the execution of the tyrant King Charles I on 30 January 1649. The regicide was in part due to Charless steadfast belief in the Divine Right of Kings, and led to a tumultuous interregnum, where England stood at its own defining crossroads. The music begins turbulently, before King Charles appears and is led to the gallows outside Banqueting House in central London where he is brutally decapitated. From the assembled crowd rose, according to one observer,a moan as I never heard before and desire I may never hear again.The music descends to emptiness.The musical argument which follows is not strictly programmatic, but a number of musical themes are all thrown into the melting pot, representing ideas such as: religion; military force; reasoned Parliamentary debate; and the chattering, irrepressible voice of the people. Additionally, there are some quotations from the music of royalist composer Thomas Tomkins (1572-1656), who was often in tune with the feeling of the times.This defining episode in England's history was brought to a close with the Restoration of the monarchy in 1660, and as the exiled King Charles II rode back into London the diarist John Evelyn wrote:Never was so joyful a day seen in this nation. I stood in the Strand and beheld it, and blessed God.At the end of the piece the bells ring out, and the musical appearance of the King has transformed from turbulent to triumphant.Duration: 17.00

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £99.99

    The Divine Right - Philip Harper

    At the time of composing this piece, the Arab Spring was sweeping through the Middle East. It seemed that almost every week a new countrys people had risen up against the regimes and dictatorships which had prevailed for generations, leaving manynations at a defining crossroads in their history. There were so many possible ways ahead: so many hopes, yet so many uncertainties.My music is a depiction of these revolutionary times, and several musical themes are in turn presented, discussed, considered, fought over, altered, rejected or accepted. Most nations have had, or probably will have, their own Arab Spring, including my own, the United Kingdom. Events of 17th Century Britain provide the context for this piece, particularly those following the execution of the tyrant King Charles I on30 January 1649. The regicide was in part due to Charless steadfast belief in the Divine Right of Kings, and led to a tumultuous interregnum, where England stood at its own defining crossroads.The music begins turbulently, before King Charles appears and is led to the gallows outside Banqueting House in central London where he is brutally decapitated. From the assembled crowd rose, according to one observer, a moan as I never heard before and desire I may never hear again.The music descends to emptiness. The musical argument which follows is not strictly programmatic, but a number of musical themes are all thrown into the melting pot, representing ideas such as: religion; military force; reasoned Parliamentary debate; and the chattering,irrepressible voice of the people. Additionally, there are some quotations from the music of royalist composer Thomas Tomkins (1572-1656), who was often in tune with the feeling of the times. This defining episode in Englands history was brought to a close with the Restoration of the monarchy in 1660, and as the exiled King Charles II rode back into London the diarist John Evelyn wrote: Never was so joyful a day seen in this nation. I stood in the Strand and beheld it, and blessed God.At the end of the piece the bells ring out, and the musical appearance of the King has transformed from turbulent to triumphant. Philip Harper, 2013

    Estimated dispatch 5-14 working days