Searching for Wind Band Music? Visit the Wind Band Music Shop
We've found 265 matches for your search

Results

  • £41.00

    You Raise me Up (cornet) - Rolf Lovland

    One of the greatest hit songs of this decade You Raise Me Up has been recorded by Russell Watson, Secret Garden, Michael Ball and, more recently (and perhaps best-known), by the great Irish boy-band Westlife. With your Solo Cornet taking the limelight this award-winning arrangement is one title that will be a surefire hit with both bands and audiences.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £74.95

    Eden - John Pickard

    This work was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the final of the 2005 Besson National Brass Band Championship, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London.The score is prefaced by the final lines from Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost (completed in 1663), in which Adam and Eve, expelled from Paradise, make their uncertain way into the outside world:“…The world was all before them, where to chooseTheir place of rest, and providence their guide:They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow,Through Eden took their solitary way.”My work is in three linked sections. In the first, the characters of Adam, Eve and the serpent guarding the Tree of Knowledge are respectively represented by solo euphonium, cornet and trombone. The music opens in an idyllic and tranquil mood and leads into a duet between euphonium and cornet. Throughout this passage the prevailing mood darkens, though the soloists seem to remain oblivious to the increasingly fraught atmosphere. A whip-crack announces the malevolent appearance of the solo trombone who proceeds to engage the solo cornet in a sinister dialogue.The second section interprets the Eden story as a modern metaphor for the havoc mankind has inflicted upon the world, exploiting and abusing its resources in the pursuit of wealth. Though certainly intended here as a comment on the present-day, it is by no means a new idea: Milton himself had an almost prescient awareness of it in Book I of his poem, where men, led on by Mammon:“…Ransacked the centre and with impious handsRifled the bowels of their mother earthFor treasures better hid. Soon had his crewOpened into the hill a spacious woundAnd digged out ribs of gold.”So this section is fast and violent, at times almost manic in its destructive energy. At length a furious climax subsides and a tolling bell ushers in the third and final section.This final part is slow, beginning with an intense lament featuring solos for tenor-horn, fl?gel-horn and repiano cornet and joined later by solo baritone, soprano cornet, Eb-bass and Bb-bass.At one stage in the planning of the work it seemed likely that the music would end here – in despair. Then, mid-way through writing it, I visited the extraordinary Eden Project in Cornwall. Here, in a disused quarry – a huge man-made wound in the earth – immense biomes, containing an abundance of plant species from every region of the globe, together with an inspirational education programme, perhaps offer a small ray of hope for the future. This is the image behind the work’s conclusion and the optimism it aims to express is real enough, though it is hard-won and challenged to the last.John Pickard 2005

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £74.95

    Eden - Score & Parts - John Pickard

    This work was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the final of the 2005 Besson National Brass Band Championship, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London.The score is prefaced by the final lines from Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost (completed in 1663), in which Adam and Eve, expelled from Paradise, make their uncertain way into the outside world:“…The world was all before them, where to chooseTheir place of rest, and providence their guide:They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow,Through Eden took their solitary way.”My work is in three linked sections. In the first, the characters of Adam, Eve and the serpent guarding the Tree of Knowledge are respectively represented by solo euphonium, cornet and trombone. The music opens in an idyllic and tranquil mood and leads into a duet between euphonium and cornet. Throughout this passage the prevailing mood darkens, though the soloists seem to remain oblivious to the increasingly fraught atmosphere. A whip-crack announces the malevolent appearance of the solo trombone who proceeds to engage the solo cornet in a sinister dialogue.The second section interprets the Eden story as a modern metaphor for the havoc mankind has inflicted upon the world, exploiting and abusing its resources in the pursuit of wealth. Though certainly intended here as a comment on the present-day, it is by no means a new idea: Milton himself had an almost prescient awareness of it in Book I of his poem, where men, led on by Mammon:“…Ransacked the centre and with impious handsRifled the bowels of their mother earthFor treasures better hid. Soon had his crewOpened into the hill a spacious woundAnd digged out ribs of gold.”So this section is fast and violent, at times almost manic in its destructive energy. At length a furious climax subsides and a tolling bell ushers in the third and final section.This final part is slow, beginning with an intense lament featuring solos for tenor-horn, fl?gel-horn and repiano cornet and joined later by solo baritone, soprano cornet, Eb-bass and Bb-bass.At one stage in the planning of the work it seemed likely that the music would end here – in despair. Then, mid-way through writing it, I visited the extraordinary Eden Project in Cornwall. Here, in a disused quarry – a huge man-made wound in the earth – immense biomes, containing an abundance of plant species from every region of the globe, together with an inspirational education programme, perhaps offer a small ray of hope for the future. This is the image behind the work’s conclusion and the optimism it aims to express is real enough, though it is hard-won and challenged to the last.John Pickard 2005

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £27.50

    A Hebridean Lullaby - Score and Parts - Philip Harper

    Composed for World Solo Champion Katrina Marzella and the Cornwall Youth Brass Band, A Hebridean Lullaby is a beautiful and haunting melody from the pen of Philip Harper, taking its inspiration from the music and folksong of the Hebrides; a cluster of islands off the west coast of Scotland. Commissioned through a BBC Fame Academy Bursary, this piece is one which is enjoyed and admired by both performers and audiences the world over. The atmosphere created by the score is simply stunning. It's an outstanding addition to the baritone horn's concert repertoire.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £20.00

    A Hebridean Lullaby - Score Only - Philip Harper

    Composed for World Solo Champion Katrina Marzella and the Cornwall Youth Brass Band, A Hebridean Lullaby is a beautiful and haunting melody from the pen of Philip Harper, taking its inspiration from the music and folksong of the Hebrides; a cluster of islands off the west coast of Scotland. Commissioned through a BBC Fame Academy Bursary, this piece is one which is enjoyed and admired by both performers and audiences the world over. The atmosphere created by the score is simply stunning. It's an outstanding addition to the baritone horn's concert repertoire.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £117.00

    EKSTASE - Thomas Doss

    EKSTASE is a piece about a mentally ill patient who is kept completely shut off from the outside world. His condition is worsening, and due to his medication the border between the real world and his hallucinations becomes increasingly vague. One day the patient discovers an old piano and begins to play Mozart which brings both himself and other patients back to life. A very innovative and virtuoso new work from Thomas Doss.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £59.95

    Rhapsody in Brass - Dean Goffin

    Rhapsody in Brass is in three movements and was written for the British Open Championships in 1949, held at Belle Vue in Manchester. The contest winners were Fairey Aviation Works Band under the baton of Harry Mortimer. Eric Ball came second with Ransome & Marles and Stanley Boddington 3rd with Munn and Felton Band. Rhapsody in Brass had the unusual distinction of being written as a test piece by a Salvation Army composer. Eric Ball's Resurgam was the only other piece to achieve that dual personality in that era.Dean Goffin was born in 1916 in Wellington, New Zealand, son of Henry Goffin, a Salvation Army officer and composer. At 19 he was appointed Bandmaster of the Wellington South Band and when World War II started, he enlisted in the New Zealand Armed Forces where he became Bandmaster of the 20th Infantry Battalion and later the 4th Brigade Band. During the time he served with them in the Middle East and Europe, he composed and arranged numerous pieces among which Rhapsody in Brass and the march Bel Hamid, later adapted for Salvation Army use and renamed Anthem of the Free.After the war, Dean kept on composing and his work was featured by the Wellington South Band. Later he transferred to Timaru for another job and became Bandmaster there. He was studying music at the time and as he wanted to take part in a competition for devotional selections for Salvation Army use, he sent some of his compositions to the International Headquarters. When Rhapsody for Brass was chosen as the test-piece for the British Open Championships, people at the Salvation Army started asking questions about the lack of publications of his work. It was discovered that the pieces submitted for the competition didn't meet the exact criteria. Among these pieces was one of his most appealing works The Light of the World which was published a year later, in 1950, the same year as he completed his Bachelor of Music studies at Otagu University.After entering the Salvation Army Training College in Wellington with his wife, Marjorie, Dean was in 1956 appointed National Bandmaster in the British Territory. Later he became National Secretary for Bands and Songster Brigades and in this period he organised the yearly festival in the Royal Albert Hall and was responsible for the national music schools in the UK. Dean returned to his home country in 1966 and to mark the centenary of the Salvation Army in New Zealand he was knighted by the Queen in 1983. Sir Dean Goffin died on 23 January 1984.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £44.95

    The Enigma Machine - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Enigma Machine takes its name from the famous cipher machine used by the Germans in World War Two. The wartime Enigma cipher was cracked at Bletchley Park by teams of British code-breakers, including the legendary Cambridge mathematician Alan Turing.Some of Britain’s finest brains of the period worked to decipher Enigma messages. Key to their success was working with UK industry to produce machines which automated various code-breaking tasks. One important collaboration was with the engineers at the Post Office (a predecessor of BT) who designed and built the world’s first electronic computer ‘Colossus’ which was a pioneering achievement in 1940’s wartime Britain.Their collaborative work was part of a top-secret operation called ‘Ultra’ which proved to be vital in the defeat of Nazi Germany.When performing this piece it is important to note that you will require the use of a WW2 siren. You can use either a real machine or a sound effect that can be played through a speaker system.During this piece there are many and varied morse code messages played by the different members of the band. These various instructions and messages have been taken from books and documents highlighting the types of messages that were sent to various military groups during the war.This piece uses a variety of musical styles: From the jumbled eerie messages given by the Germans at figure A, to the combat scenes at B and beyond, the military marching at G and the reference to Walton’s Spitfire Fugue at H. The middle movement features a quotation from the last post and then after a recapitulation of the opening material with embedded morse code throughout, the piece climaxes with a development of the famous last post motif to a tub-thumping ending.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £49.95

    Bestowal of a Century - Christopher Bond

    Tenor Horn Solo with Brass BandBestowal of a Century (2014) was commissioned by Lowenna Taylor, and funded through her Harry Mortimer Trust award which she was presented with at the 2013 British Open Championship following the completion of her studies at the Royal Welsh College of Music in Cardiff. The 15-minute work received its world premiere at the Cornwall Youth Brass Band Christmas concert in 2014 with solosit, Lowenna, working alongside the band under the baton of Les Neish.The Bestowal refers to the presentation of the Royal Trophy by the then Prince of Wales to the famous West of England Bandsman’s Festival in Bugle in 1913. Over the years it has been won by some of the greatest names in brass banding, including Black Dyke and Munn & Feltons - although more recently it has become a wonderful open festival that includes sections for local bands as well as visitors from all over the banding globe. 2014 marked the one-hundredth anniversary of the presentation of the trophy, which is the only brass band trophy to have the official seal of royal patronage.The work, in three distinct sections, opens in a mysterious way, building progressively with interjections from the horn. The composer notes its as though one can imagine different part of the trophy being put together, piece by piece, until the trophy is complete and a climax is reached. Following this, a playful theme is presented which is developed throughout the first section and interacting between soloist and band.The second movement, in complete contrast, is a lyrical melody; heart-wrenching throughout, and sits well both as part of the concerto and also as a stand-alone solo item. The third movement is light-hearted and virtuosic, demonstrating the technical capabilities of the instrument with fast and virtuosic playing, and a cadenza towards the end of the work.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £24.95

    Cleopatra - Eugene Damare

    Cleopatra is one of the most famous of all triple tongue polkas and remains a favourite among cornet soloists around the world. This arrangement was made by the late R John Childs when he was conductor of Tredegar Town Band.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days