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  • £103.00

    Fest - Polonaise - Johan Svendsen - Kjell Olav Martinsen

    Johan Svendsen (1840 - 1911) was the first great Norwegian symphonic composer, as well as one of the leading conductors of his time. Next to Edv. Grieg, he was the most prominent figure in Norwegian music life at the end of the 1800's. Although he came from humble beginnings in Chistiania (now Oslo), he was to become a cosmopolitan who felt at home all over Europa. Svendsen spent most of his adult life abroad, living in Copenhagen for 25 years as maestro for the Royal Theatre Orchestra. Nonetheless he retained contact with Norway troughout these years and was a frequent and popular guest in his native country. He wrote his Festival Polonaise for a ball in 1873. This polonaise in a big ABA style

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    March to the Scaffold - Hector Berlioz - Robert Childs

    The Symphonie Fantastique, the first of Berlioz's major works, was composed in 1830 when he was 26. 'March to the Scaffold', the fourth movement in this major work is music borrowed from Les Francs Juges, an abandoned opera started in 1826, originally titled 'March of the Guards'. The ending of the original was changed to accommodate the appearance of the id?e fixe. This tune itself was used in an earlier work, the cantata Herminie of 1828. March to the Scaffold depicts a young man in despair, having been shunned by the woman he loves. He poisons himself with opium. The narcotic, too weak to take his life, plunges the man into a long sleep. He has a series of vivid dreams and nightmares always involving images of his beloved. The hero dreams that he has killed her and has been sentenced to death. He sees himself being marched through the crowded streets amidst wild jeers from excited onlookers until he finally reaches the scaffold.Just before the guillotine descends to cut off his head, he imagines he sees his beloved in the crowd. Her tune is played by the soprano cornet and is the last thing seen or heard before the guillotine falls. He is killed, and the movement comes to a dramatic close.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £62.80

    In Charge - Concert March - Jerker Johansson

    In Charge was commissioned by the Home Guard Band of Eksjo to honour Thomas Samuelsson, whose efforts with the orchestra have been of great significance. He was a driving person within Swedish military music and furthermore project manager for Eksjo International Tattoo. Thomas worked at Eksjo Energy and the title of this work hints both to his occupation and his administrative leadership in the band. The first part of this concert march concentrates a lot on syncopation, while the second part is more robust with a traditional and lyrical trio part. In Charge was premiered by the Home Guard Band of Eksjo on the 22th of December 2018, conducted by Maria Sandberg.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £44.95

    A Pastoral Symphony (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Redhead, Robert

    This symphony for brass band seeks to explore the thought that 'the greatest need of any congregation is its pastor's personal holiness'. The first movement challenges the pastor 'to serve the present age', the tunes 'Majesty' and 'Lathbury' are used. The second movement expresses a priority to 'Seek...first the Kingdom of God'. The short third movement presents the question 'Except I am moved with compassion, how dwellest they Spirit in me?' before the triumphant finale reflects the desire of every Christian that his life and work will always be for the glory of God with the presentation of 'In my life Lord, be glorified'.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £22.50

    A Pastoral Symphony (Brass Band - Score only) - Redhead, Robert

    This symphony for brass band seeks to explore the thought that 'the greatest need of any congregation is its pastor's personal holiness'. The first movement challenges the pastor 'to serve the present age', the tunes 'Majesty' and 'Lathbury' are used. The second movement expresses a priority to 'Seek...first the Kingdom of God'. The short third movement presents the question 'Except I am moved with compassion, how dwellest they Spirit in me?' before the triumphant finale reflects the desire of every Christian that his life and work will always be for the glory of God with the presentation of 'In my life Lord, be glorified'.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £64.95

    The Flowers of the Forest (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Bennett, Richard Rodney - Hindmarsh, Paul

    In a preface to the score, the composer explains that ‘the folk song The Flowers of the Forest is believed to date from 1513, the time if the battle of Flodden, in the course of which the archers of the Forest (a part of Scotland) were killed almost to a man’. Bennett had already used the same tune in his Six Scottish Folksongs (1972) for soprano, tenor and piano, and it is the arrangement he made then that forms the starting-point for the brass-band piece. A slow introduction (Poco Adagio) presents the folk song theme three times in succession - on solo cornet, on solo cornets and tenor horns, and on muted ripieno cornets in close harmony - after which the work unfolds through five sections and a coda. Although played without a break, each of these five sections has its own identity, developing elements of the tune somewhat in the manner of variations, but with each arising from and evolving into the next. The first of these sections (Con moto, tranquillo) is marked by an abrupt shift of tonality, and makes much of the slow rises and falls characteristic of the tune itself. The tempo gradually increases, to arrive at a scherzando section (Vivo) which includes the first appearance of the theme in its inverted form. A waltz-like trio is followed by a brief return of the scherzando, leading directly to a second, more extended, scherzo (con brio) based on a lilting figure no longer directly related to the theme. As this fades, a single side drum introduces an element of more overtly martial tension (Alla Marcia) and Bennett says that, from this point on, he was thinking of Debussy’s tribute to the memory of an unknown soldier (in the second movement of En Blanc et noir, for two pianos). Bennett’s march gradually gathers momentum, eventually culminating in a short-lived elegiac climax (Maestoso) before the music returns full-circle to the subdued melancholy of the opening. The work ends with a haunting pianissimo statement of the original tune.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    The Flowers of the Forest (Brass Band - Score only) - Bennett, Richard Rodney - Hindmarsh, Paul

    In a preface to the score, the composer explains that ‘the folk song The Flowers of the Forest is believed to date from 1513, the time if the battle of Flodden, in the course of which the archers of the Forest (a part of Scotland) were killed almost to a man’. Bennett had already used the same tune in his Six Scottish Folksongs (1972) for soprano, tenor and piano, and it is the arrangement he made then that forms the starting-point for the brass-band piece. A slow introduction (Poco Adagio) presents the folk song theme three times in succession - on solo cornet, on solo cornets and tenor horns, and on muted ripieno cornets in close harmony - after which the work unfolds through five sections and a coda. Although played without a break, each of these five sections has its own identity, developing elements of the tune somewhat in the manner of variations, but with each arising from and evolving into the next. The first of these sections (Con moto, tranquillo) is marked by an abrupt shift of tonality, and makes much of the slow rises and falls characteristic of the tune itself. The tempo gradually increases, to arrive at a scherzando section (Vivo) which includes the first appearance of the theme in its inverted form. A waltz-like trio is followed by a brief return of the scherzando, leading directly to a second, more extended, scherzo (con brio) based on a lilting figure no longer directly related to the theme. As this fades, a single side drum introduces an element of more overtly martial tension (Alla Marcia) and Bennett says that, from this point on, he was thinking of Debussy’s tribute to the memory of an unknown soldier (in the second movement of En Blanc et noir, for two pianos). Bennett’s march gradually gathers momentum, eventually culminating in a short-lived elegiac climax (Maestoso) before the music returns full-circle to the subdued melancholy of the opening. The work ends with a haunting pianissimo statement of the original tune.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £59.95

    Ballet for Band - Score & Parts - Joseph Horovitz

    Ballet for Band was written as the test-piece for the Championship section finals of the National Brass Band Championships, held at the Royal Albert Hall in October 1983.Although the work is not programmatic, within the space of ten minutes, the composer uses a form which might be considered to be the form of a ballet. Therefore there is a fanfare at the beginning which might be the overture, different characters appear, and scenes are quite clearly marked by, for instance, baritones or by muted trombone, although the listener is encouraged to use his own imagination.Thematically the work is tightly controlled, with the same material re-appearing in many different guises, as a flugel horn solo, as a waltz on the horns, and on the euphonium. Horovitz employs a rich harmonic pallet, but the work is most definitely rooted in a tonal language, with hints of Straussian richness later in the work.The work is notable for its middle section, in which the music gets slower and slower, providing a real test of control throughout the band.Ballet for Band was by no means Joseph Horovitz’s first work for the medium: his fine “Concerto for Euphonium and Band” is frequently played, and he has also written a cantata entitled “Samson” for choir and band.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £29.95

    Ballet for Band - Score Only - Joseph Horovitz

    Ballet for Band was written as the test-piece for the Championship section finals of the National Brass Band Championships, held at the Royal Albert Hall in October 1983.Although the work is not programmatic, within the space of ten minutes, the composer uses a form which might be considered to be the form of a ballet. Therefore there is a fanfare at the beginning which might be the overture, different characters appear, and scenes are quite clearly marked by, for instance, baritones or by muted trombone, although the listener is encouraged to use his own imagination.Thematically the work is tightly controlled, with the same material re-appearing in many different guises, as a flugel horn solo, as a waltz on the horns, and on the euphonium. Horovitz employs a rich harmonic pallet, but the work is most definitely rooted in a tonal language, with hints of Straussian richness later in the work.The work is notable for its middle section, in which the music gets slower and slower, providing a real test of control throughout the band.Ballet for Band was by no means Joseph Horovitz’s first work for the medium: his fine “Concerto for Euphonium and Band” is frequently played, and he has also written a cantata entitled “Samson” for choir and band.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £12.00

    Dragon Dances

    Dragon Dances was commissioned by Owen Farr, who is also the work's dedicatee, gave the first performance with the Cornwall Youth Band conducted by Richard Evans on 5 April 2010 and has recorded it on his solo CD "A New Dawn" accompanied by the Cory Band conducted by Philip Harper.Being a Welsh composer, writing music for a Welsh soloist, I was naturally keen to reflect this in the music, and I drew inspiration from two particularly Welsh concepts - "hiraeth" and "hwyl". "Hiraeth" is a word that has no direct translation into English, but an approximation would be 'yearning for home'. Like the other celtic nations, Wales has a widespread diaspora of people who left to seek new lives out in the empire and "hiraeth" is a way of summing up the homesickness felt by these exiles, some of whom return each year for a special ceremony at the Royal National Eisteddfod. "Hwyl" is an even more complicated word, variously meaning ecstatic joy, fervour, equable temperament and even the characteristic sing-song oration style of the great Welsh Methodist preachers.I have attempted to make the music reflect both of these, with the melancholy first part of the work inspired by the hymns and solo songs for which Wales is famous, and the second part having a much more dance-like, joyful quality.To view a PDF preview of the full score, click here; to view a preview of the solo part click here.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days

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