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  • £19.50

    The Farewell Symphony - Joseph Haydn - Neville Buxton

    Composed in 1772, Haydn's Symphony No.45, better known as the "Farewell Symphony" due to the circumstances of which it was composed. Haydn's employer, Prince Nikolaus became so attracted to his Eszterhaza Castle, he spent longer and longer there each year. The court musicians were not allowed their families with them and became increasingly depressed. This symphony was composed in such a way, that during the last movement, one by one, each player blew out their candle, and crept of stage. The idea being that the prince would get the subtle hint. The next day, the court returned to Vienna! Arranged in the same way, players able to walk off one by one, a perfect ending to a concert, or first half.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £28.50

    Mendelssohn Violin Concerto - 2nd Movement (trombone solo) - Mendelssohn - Richard Rock

    Felix Mendelssohn's Violin Concerto in E minor, Op. 64 is his last large orchestral work. It forms an important part of the Violin repertoire and is one of the most popular and most frequently performed violin concertos of all time.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days

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  • £25.50

    Polish Adventures - Gavin Somerset

    Composed for the All Saints Wind Band, Sheffield after their trip to Poland in the summer of 2003. This work reflects the different parts of the tour in four continuous movements... PROGRAM NOTES AS THEY APPREAR ON SCORE COVER I don't wish to ramble on with the program notes, do I do believe that if you know the story behind a piece of music, it just puts that extra something into the players performance. In 2002, the All Saints Wind Band, Sheffield, embarked on a 10 day tour of Poland. The group spent 28hrs on a couch packed with instruments, only to arrive finding Poland experiencing its worst summer in 70 years. In 2003, they decided to go back for another go! This time, luxury all the way, no 28hr coach journey, just a 1 1/2hr flight. This piece tells the story of the 2nd tour of Poland in four continuous movements... First the introduction. Early one morning, prepared for the drive to the airport, everyone tired, but excited. A day prior to this, some parents of the children set off in a van driving the instruments to the hotel, some 300 miles away. Bar 13 introduces the "Van" theme. Once arriving at the airport, the movements begin... 1. MORNING FLIGHT A very self explanatory part of the piece, and impressionist in its writing. Flying high over England and the channel, giving a sense of speed we were travelling at (compared to the poor lads in the van somewhere below us!) The Largo before F tells of the short coach journey to the hotel, and settling into what was our new home for 10 days. 2. IN THE STORM The weather was definitely an improvement on last year. So much so, that it became a regular event of the day to go and play rounders in a nearby field. This particular day however, with everyone concentrating hard on the game, it escaped everyone's attention that there was a very large storm creeping over the high mountain range near us. As the title of the movement suggests, the scene involved 25 of us running as fast as we could back to the hotel. Unfortunately, the heavy rain ran faster than us. 3. LAST MEMORIES As most of the people in the band were 18 this year, it was apparent that this would be their last event with the band. Many of the group had grown up together for the last 7 years and so, as the tour came to a close, there was a sense of sadness in the air, but everyone would always have the memories. 4. FINALE & HOME The van and the brave volunteers that went with it, set off the day before the rest of us flew home. This last movement reflect the whole tour, bringing back all the main themes from the different movements before arriving back at the school, just in time to see the van pull up. The "Van" theme makes its presence heard again towards the end. This piece was performed by the Wind Band at the leaving concert of many of the players in the band. I dedicate this piece to the band which is still functioning with new players, and to all those who took part on this tour.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £21.50

    Ding Dong Merrily On High - Darrol Barry

    Euphonium players will relish the chance this Christmas to perform one of the nations most loved Christmas carols in a solo skilfully penned by Darrol Barry. Marked ‘Giocoso’ in style, this jolly arrangement not only allows the soloist the chance to show off their virtuosic capabilities, but the band has plenty to enjoy too. A darker middle movement precedes an exciting finale which will have the audiences cheering. A must have for all euphonium soloists.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £25.50

    Symphony No.1 (2nd Mov.) - Tchaikovsky - Julian M Blakestone

    "Land of Desolation, Land of Mists" is the title given to the second movement of Tchaikovsky's First Symphony with carries the sub-title Winter Dreams, a theme carried onward by its first two movements. However, those seeking the "misty desolation" of a winter on the steppes will not find it here, for of all Tchaikovsky's symphonies, this one bears the aura of optimism.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £21.50

    Pie Jesu (From Requiem) - John Rutter - Adam Rutter

    John Rutter's music is known across the world for its simplicity and memorable melodies. The 'Pie Jesu' from his requiem is certainly no exception. First performed in Dallas, Texas in 1985, the 6 movements completed Rutter's setting of the Roman Catholic Mass. The third movement (the 'Pie Jesu') is typical of the composer, featuring a strong melody line with subtle accompaniments. Now arranged for Solo Cornet by Adam Rutter, this slow melody allows the soloist to shine in one of the finest and most famous settings of the work to date. A great addition to any concert & soloists repertoire.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £23.50

    Rondo - Allegretto (from Clarinet Concerto) - Von Weber - Andi Cook

    Born in Oldenburg, Germany, Weber composed his first two operas aged just 16. Being one of the finest pianists around, his music is filled with vigour and spirit. Weber wrote three concertos for clarinet in 1811 at the age of 25, for the Munich clarinettist, Heinrich B?rmann. The most famous movement from the first concerto has been skilfully arranged for solo cornet and brass band. A perfect showcase of a piece.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £49.95

    Blaze - Phil Lawrence

    Cornet/trumpet sounds have been changing for some years; they are becoming heavier, more robust, slower vibratos. The dynamic level now pushed out by your average solo cornet is 30% more than it was some 35/40 years ago. This, is mainly due to the bore size of instruments and mouthpiece sizes (as in bigger), and, demands of modern day works for band on the player/soloist, and of course a greater demand of styles on the player, and progressive teaching methods. The technical styles in Blaze are about these changes.In Blaze I have clearly blended symphonic blowing styles of the trumpet plus the virtuosic attributes of today's modern cornet player. Many solo cornets parts (more past than present) in band are often clearly defined between low A and top C above the stave. Orchestral trumpet players need a working range of another fourth at either end of this defined range; I have incorporated this range into the concerto. The low register is much explored, and the average tessitura throughout is constantly varied below and above the stave from pedal Eb to super F# opt. The ideology of this blend of course makes sense as the original dedication is to Rod Franks, LSO, and of course blending with that is Rod's history at Black Dyke Mills Band.The concerto is ten minutes long and in one movement comprising of four sections and one solo cadenza, with one section only appearing once, an episode. This singular section was a revised addition and dedicated to Richard Marshall who gave the first premier in New Zealand in June 2003. For the purists the form is thus, A, B, A (vari), C (episode). D (slow movement), E (3/8 episode 1), D (vari), E, (episode 2). A (last move), B, A (developed) = (coda finale).The compositional style? Well, I hope quintessentially, 21st C English with an element of nostalgia (modal/old English). There are some hints at jazz playing styles and rhumba, but romantic English I would say, and especially the slow movement.Blaze is also very bold; the title itself reflects this, full of bravura and constant amazement, offering little respite for the soloist and sapping much stamina. The opening statement from the soloist is without accompaniment; just as a matador stands alone in the ring for the first few seconds, and looks at the mass crowd in defiance, he thinks, "you are here to see me die", so the soloist stares the audience back in the face, and opens with the richest, largest sound (not loudest) one can muster, thus throwing the gauntlet down to the ears of all who might disbelieve what they are about to encounter, a gladiatorial cornet, a Blaze from the stage.For the soloist, it is a non-stop Blaze of sound, electrifying technique, sage-like musicianship, super-human stamina and sheer matador-like bravura with 10th Dan mastery of over-all control, a test beyond the reasonable. And for the audience? Of course, a BLAZE never to be forgotten. Phil LawrenceThis work can be heard performed by cornet soloist Richard Marshall & the Grimethorpe Colliery Band on their award winning album entitled 'BLAZE'

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £65.00

    The Once and Future King

    DescriptionThe Once and Future King is a suite of three movements; each movement was inspired by an Arthurian legend. The first movement, 'Tintagel', concerns the famous Cornish promontory said to be the birthplace of King Arthur. In Arthur's time, Tintagel was part of the court of King Mark of Cornwall and the music imagines a visit by the King of the Britons to his Cornish neighbour and the place of his birth, reflecting the ceremony and drama of such an occasion; the music is strongly antiphonal, contrasting the more strident fanfares of the cornets and trombones with the warmth of the saxhorns and tubas.The second movement, 'Lyonesse', takes its inspiration from the mythical land which once joined Cornwall to the Isles of Scilly. One legend claims that after the disastrous battle of Camlan where Arthur and Mordred were both killed, the remnants of Arthur's army were pursued across Lyonesse to Scilly, whereupon Merlin cast a spell to sink Lyonesse behind them and drown the pursuers. Some say the bells of the 140 churches inundated that day can still be heard ringing. All the material in this movement derives from two short motifs heard in counterpoint at the very beginning, which are intentionally dissonant and bitonal in character.The final movement, 'Badon Hill', takes its title from the legendary site of Arthur's last battle with the Saxons and is a lively toccata based on the medieval secular song L'Homme Armee ('The Armed Man'). The music uses a number of medieval devices including "hocketing" (passing melody from one voice to another). The actual site of Badon Hill is unknown but it has been associated with Badbury Rings in Dorset and a lot of evidence now points towards the town of Bath. Arthur's victory at Badon Hill was the last great victory for Celtic Britain over the Saxon invaders, but in the end only set the conquest back by a few decades. Arthur himself was dead by then, betrayed and defeated by his nephew Mordred, but it is said that Arthur only sleeps and will return in a time of dire need – hence the legend that Arthur's dying words were: Bury me in Britain, for I am the Once and Future King.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days

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  • £102.00

    Rhapsody in Black - Andi Cook

    Rhapsody in Black - Andi Cook - 10'40'' - BVT126 The primary inspiration for this work comes from the composer’s first encounter with the genre of Symphonic Metal - the opening track of the 2004 Nightwish album 'Once', entitled Dark chest of Wonders. The combination of full orchestra, operatically trained female vocals and the raw power of a Scandinavian metal band was a potent mix that instantly had me hooked.That same dark and powerful sound is one that a brass band can generate, and I've tried to capture that in this composition. Heavy Rock/Metal as a genre is arguably fifty years old now, but symphonic metal is a newer concept, and I feel possibly the one that can bridge the gap between two musical styles very dear to me.Composer Gilbert Vinter had explored through music the connotations that different colours held for him, and his movement Purple from 'Spectrum' gave me an idea for the structure of ‘Rhapsody in Black’. Andi Cook explored the different connotations of one colour within his own life, black being an easy choice due to the personal dichotomy of the black leather jacket he wore to the rock club on Friday night and the black suit jacket and tie he wore to the concert hall the next day.To avoid repetition the word 'black' is omitted from the five movement titles, each of which is a different episode. '...as Thunder' is a furious argument between two people - the top and bottom of the band - set against the backdrop of a storm, with lightning flashing outside while barbs, insults, sarcasm, tears and even violence is traded inside. Following that '...Satin and Pearls' is an old black-and-white movie with a wistful character to it as if we're looking back a screen icon with fondness long after their career or even their life has ended. '...as the Raven's Wing.' is deliberately gothic and funereal, hinting at Edgar Allen Poe's similarly named poem, with undertones of death and afterlife. The shift into F/C Minor (band pitch) represents the descent - alive - into the grave that Poe had a paranoid fear of his entire life. Family and friends standing around grieving, oblivious as we're lowered into the earth despite frantic attempts to make ourselves heard. '...and Chrome' is an unashamed motorcycle reference with all its born-to-be-wild, open air, high speed and freedom overtones. In a deliberate contrast to what went before it continues several of the same motifs though this time in the major key. Lastly, we reprise the second movement with '...as the Night Sky' which is simply the feeling of walking home under the summer stars, with someone important - who that is, is left to the listener, but a walk under the stars is always that bit special.There's an old saying that very few things are black and white. I hope this work will prove that even black alone isn't quite as simple as it's often made out....‘Rhapsody in Black’ is dedicated to the composer’s friend and mentor John Roberts, who shares his love of both brass and rock.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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