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  • £93.00

    Chain (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

    Chain was composed between June and August 2000 as the test piece for the 2002 European Brass Band Championship. The composer's idea was to compose a one-movement piece - a work that starts mysteriously and develops in various directions. As his basic material, he chose a figure that is the abbreviation of the European Brass Band Championship: EBBC. This figure is developed in a chain of figures which gradually lead to the climax of the piece. 12:00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £97.00

    Chain - Piet Swerts

    Chain was composed between June and August 2000 as the test piece for the 2002 European Brass Band Championship. The composer's idea was to compose a one-movement piece - a work that starts mysteriously and develops in various directions. As his basic material, he chose a figure that is the abbreviation of the European Brass Band Championship: EBBC. This figure is developed in a chain of figures which gradually lead to the climax of the piece.

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days
  • £79.95

    Waiting for a Pain Hit!??!!? - Paul McGhee

    Waiting For a Pain Hit!??!!? was written during November and December 2006 as an entry in the 2006/07 Swiss Brass Band Association Composers Competition. It was later chosen as the Championship Section set test piece for the 2010 Swiss National Brass Band Championships.The piece originates from sketches for a Brass Quintet which was written whilst I was in my second year of studies at the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama. The piece, now being much more elaborate both musically and structurally than the original, aims to explore the many various textures available to a large brass ensemble. The aims of the piece, from its earliest stages, were mainly exploration of textures as well as dealing with issues of continuity and whilst the piece certainly contains challenging technical elements, they were not a driving force behind its inception and more organically grew from the primary aims of the piece. I was purposefully looking throughout the writing and editing process to create a piece of music with a seamless, ethereal quality to both the structure and the musical content.There are no 'performance directions' throughout the piece, the reasoning for this is explained below. However, I have spent much time and thought over the tempo markings throughout the piece and the tempos throughout the piece are the desired tempi and care should be taken with these. The tempo markings contained throughout the piece form a vital part of the structure and affect the continuity of the piece. Metronome marks contained within a box show the tempo of the new section in relation to the tempo that precedes it by use of metronome modulations. Any alterations tothe tempo of the section that precedes it will alter the boxed metronome marks.The title of a piece of music, please forgive my generalisation, is to give an insight into 'what a piece is about'. I suppose that this piece is no different, but with the title being slightly abstract I shall resist the temptation to reveal what it means to me. The title, I feel, needs to be open to interpretation along with the music within. That's the way, with this piece especially, I like my music to be. Freedom to find our own meaning and a way to express it from within the score is vital. It is only then that the piece can take on its own identity and grow in ways that even I might not have imagined, revealing different sides to its personality with each performance.Before the music begins I have included some text. Do these words hold the key to the music?! Can they help??!I DON'T KNOW!!!I just like the rhythms, the pulse and the imagery. Hopefully all of this can help to create a picture. But let it be your picture...Paul McGhee, June 2010.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £74.95

    Whitsun Wakes - Score and Parts - Michael Ball

    Whitsun Wakes was commissioned by the BBC and first performed by Black Dyke Band, conducted by James Watson, in Manchester's Bridgewater Hall on 26th May, 1997 as part of the BBC's 'Music Live' Festival. It was subsequently selected as a test piece for the British Open Championship which was scheduled to be held on 6th September 1997 at Birmingham's Symphony Hall. Unfortunately this was the day of the funeral of Diana, Princess of Wales and so the British Open was postponed until 17th January, 1998. However the greatest irony is the fact that although this piece takes its inspiration from the Manchester area it was destined to be played at the first British Open Championship to take place outside Manchester.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    Whitsun Wakes - Score Only - Michael Ball

    Whitsun Wakes was commissioned by the BBC and first performed by Black Dyke Band, conducted by James Watson, in Manchester's Bridgewater Hall on 26th May, 1997 as part of the BBC's 'Music Live' Festival. It was subsequently selected as a test piece for the British Open Championship which was scheduled to be held on 6th September 1997 at Birmingham's Symphony Hall. Unfortunately this was the day of the funeral of Diana, Princess of Wales and so the British Open was postponed until 17th January, 1998. However the greatest irony is the fact that although this piece takes its inspiration from the Manchester area it was destined to be played at the first British Open Championship to take place outside Manchester.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £80.00

    Concertino For Brass Band (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Downie, Kenneth

    This music, in its original four movement form called 'Concerto for Brass Band', was commissioned by Brass Band Treize Etoiles from Switzerland as an own-choice test piece. For its use as the test piece for the Championship Section of the 2008 National Brass Band Championships of Great Britain it was specially published without the second movement Scherzo (available separately) as 'Concertino for Brass Band'.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £39.95

    Concertino For Brass Band (Brass Band - Score Only) - Downie, Kenneth

    This music, in its original four movement form called 'Concerto for Brass Band', was commissioned by Brass Band Treize Etoiles from Switzerland as an own-choice test piece. For its use as the test piece for the Championship Section of the 2008 National Brass Band Championships of Great Britain it was specially published without the second movement Scherzo (available separately) as 'Concertino for Brass Band'.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £10.00

    Concertino for Brass Band - Study Score - Kenneth Downie

    This music, in its original four movement form called 'Concerto for Brass Band', was commissioned by Brass Band Treize Etoiles from Switzerland as an own-choice test piece. For its use as the test piece for the Championship Section of the 2008 National Brass Band Championships of Great Britain it was specially published without the second movement Scherzo (available separately) as 'Concertino for Brass Band'.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £79.95

    Malcolm Arnold Variations - Score and Parts - Martin Ellerby

    MALCOLM ARNOLD VARIATIONS was commissioned by Philip Biggs and Richard Franklin for the 20th All England Masters International Brass Band Championship held in the Corn Exchange, Cambridge on 25 May 2008. The work is dedicated to Anthony Day, long time carer of Sir Malcolm Arnold in his final years. I first met Malcolm and Anthony in 1990 and remained in constant touch until Malcolm’s passing in 2006. Anthony, of course, remains a friend and plays his own role subliminally in this piece. The work is not based on any of Malcolm Arnold’s own themes, rather it is a portrait of him (and by association Anthony Day) through my eyes and as a result of my friendship with both parties over some 18 years. If there is any theme as such it is the personalities of the players, the protagonist and his carer placed together by my own efforts coloured and influenced by aspects of Arnold’s style and technique without recourse to direct quotation but through allusion and parody. It is of course designed as a brass band test piece but in my eyes is first and foremost a musical challenge. The pyrotechnical elements are there but always secondary to the musical thrust of the work’s structure. I have long beforehand submerged myself in Malcolm Arnold’s music and ultimately delivered this tribute. Music Directors will be advised to acquaint themselves with the composer’s personal music, particularly the film scores, symphonies, concertos and ballets: the solutions towards a successful interpretation of my piece are all in there – and YES, I want, and sanction, this piece to be interpreted, and therein lies the challenge for those of you ‘up front’! The challenge for players is that of virtuosity, ensemble and careful attention to where they are individually in relation to their colleagues – a question of balance, taste and insight. With regard to tempi, as is my usual custom, I have indicated all metronome marks with the prefix circa. I would suggest that the fast music is played at these tempos but that the more rubato moments can be allowed some freedom in expression and fluidity of line. With regard to the type of mutes to be employed – this decision I leave to the discretion of players and conductors. Structurally the work is cast as an Introduction, 20 Variations and a Finale. Some variations are self contained, others run into each other as sequences in the same tempo. In other variations, segments are repeated and developed. I could describe the overall concept as a miniature ballet or a condensed film score – there is much drama and character and the repeated elements assist this in driving the action forward. I have deliberately avoided the more extremely dark qualities of Malcolm’s own music in this, my celebration of this master-composer, as I have always viewed (and evidenced by my previous Masters scores Tristan Encounters and Chivalry) that the Cambridge contest is a ‘sunshine- affair’ and firmly believe that Malcolm Arnold would have had it no other way too!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £39.95

    Malcolm Arnold Variations - Score Only - Martin Ellerby

    MALCOLM ARNOLD VARIATIONS was commissioned by Philip Biggs and Richard Franklin for the 20th All England Masters International Brass Band Championship held in the Corn Exchange, Cambridge on 25 May 2008. The work is dedicated to Anthony Day, long time carer of Sir Malcolm Arnold in his final years. I first met Malcolm and Anthony in 1990 and remained in constant touch until Malcolm’s passing in 2006. Anthony, of course, remains a friend and plays his own role subliminally in this piece. The work is not based on any of Malcolm Arnold’s own themes, rather it is a portrait of him (and by association Anthony Day) through my eyes and as a result of my friendship with both parties over some 18 years. If there is any theme as such it is the personalities of the players, the protagonist and his carer placed together by my own efforts coloured and influenced by aspects of Arnold’s style and technique without recourse to direct quotation but through allusion and parody. It is of course designed as a brass band test piece but in my eyes is first and foremost a musical challenge. The pyrotechnical elements are there but always secondary to the musical thrust of the work’s structure. I have long beforehand submerged myself in Malcolm Arnold’s music and ultimately delivered this tribute. Music Directors will be advised to acquaint themselves with the composer’s personal music, particularly the film scores, symphonies, concertos and ballets: the solutions towards a successful interpretation of my piece are all in there – and YES, I want, and sanction, this piece to be interpreted, and therein lies the challenge for those of you ‘up front’! The challenge for players is that of virtuosity, ensemble and careful attention to where they are individually in relation to their colleagues – a question of balance, taste and insight. With regard to tempi, as is my usual custom, I have indicated all metronome marks with the prefix circa. I would suggest that the fast music is played at these tempos but that the more rubato moments can be allowed some freedom in expression and fluidity of line. With regard to the type of mutes to be employed – this decision I leave to the discretion of players and conductors. Structurally the work is cast as an Introduction, 20 Variations and a Finale. Some variations are self contained, others run into each other as sequences in the same tempo. In other variations, segments are repeated and developed. I could describe the overall concept as a miniature ballet or a condensed film score – there is much drama and character and the repeated elements assist this in driving the action forward. I have deliberately avoided the more extremely dark qualities of Malcolm’s own music in this, my celebration of this master-composer, as I have always viewed (and evidenced by my previous Masters scores Tristan Encounters and Chivalry) that the Cambridge contest is a ‘sunshine- affair’ and firmly believe that Malcolm Arnold would have had it no other way too!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days