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  • £40.00 £40.00
    Buy from PHM Publishing

    FRANK BRIDGE - THE COMPLETE WORKS (print)

    FRANK BRIDGE - THE COMPLETE WORKS Portraits of English composer in his time, with full Thematic Catalog of Works (1900 - 1941), compiled and edited by Paul Hindmarsh Revised edition published in 2016 by PHM Publishing ? 2016 by Paul Hindmarsh 272pp, A4, Print version (? 40.00) available by pre-paid order via www.paulhindmarsh.com PHMB001print FRANK BRIDGE - THE COMPLETE WORKS is a major revision and update of my life and work of this English composer originally published by Faber Music in 1983. Frank Bridge - A Thematic Catalog charted the composer's intriguing creative journey from 1900, the year of his first surviving compositions were 61 in 1941. Much has changed with regard to Bridge research since 1983. His life and work has been the subject of many post-graduate research projects. All his major works have been recorded and are more widely performed. Bridge's music has been in the public domain since 2011. April 13, 2016, when the manuscript of Phantasie in F minor for string quartet (H.55) was discovered in the archive of theWorshipful Company of Musicians. After half a lifetime of writing about Bridge's life and work for journals, program previews and registration notes, I have a lot of writing and an extensive selection of correspondence by Bridge and his friends and some significant 'period' articles and images to create, I hope, a more complete picture of Frank Bridge inthe context of his time. I have also included full details of commercial recordings or each work (up to January 2016) within the chronological sequence. Paul Hindmarsh, April 2016 Contents Time line PART 1 Bridge in his time 1 Biographical sketch - Seeds of Discontent Paul Hindmarsh 2 The Good Old Days Ivor James (1941) 3 Memories of a unique friendship Daphne Oliver (1979) 4 Modern British Composers I: Frank Bridge Edwin Evans (1919) 5 An Interview with Frank Bridge P.J. Nolan (1923) 6 Frank Bridge Herbert Howells (1941) PART 2 The Complete Works 1 Introduction 2 Sources 3 Thematic Catalog of Works 1900-41 4 Classifieds Index of Works 5 Bibliography Jessica Chan and Paul Hindmarsh Index of titles and first lines General index

  • £34.95

    Three Burns Portraits - Rodney Newton

    Robert Burns (1759-1796) was one of the most colourful literary figures of the 18th Century. The son of a tenant farmer, he was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, and earned a living variously as a farmer, flax dresser and exercise man, gradually establishing himself as a poet, lyricist and collector of folksongs. A charismatic character, by the time of his death he had become Scotland's best known and best-loved poet. This work depicts three characters from his personal life who also figure in his poetry. Although Burns intended much of his verse to be sung, and even wrote tunes himself for many of his lyrics, all the melodies in this work are original.I John AndersonJohn Anderson (1759-1832) was an Ayrshire carpenter and close friend to Robert Burns, who immortalised Anderson in his affectionate poem John Anderson Ma Jo, which imagines both men in old age (although Burns was only 37 when he died). Anderson is reputed to have made Robert Burns' coffin and survived the wrecking of the paddle steamer Cornet at Craignish Point near Oban during a storm in 1820, an event incorporated into this movement. This is a picture of a tough, resilient Scot who meets the storms of Life head-on.II Mary CampbellRobert Burns had numerous love affairs, sometimes with more than one woman at a time. Mary Campbell, a sailor's daughter from the highland district of Dunoon, had entered service with a family in Ayrshire when she met Burns. Although involved with another woman at the time, Burns was smitten with Campbell and there is evidence to suggest that he planned to emigrate to Jamaica with Mary. However, nothing came of this wild scheme and Mary, fearing disgrace and scandal left the area but not before Burns had enshrined her in at least two poems, Highland Mary and To Mary Campbell. Significantly, the first line of the latter runs, "Will ye go to the Indies, my Mary, and leave auld Scotia's Shore?" (His ardent pleading can be heard in the middle section of the movement). Mary's music paints a portrait of a graceful young lady who had the presence of mind not to be entirely won over by the charms of Robert Burns.III Douglas GrahamBurns was a heavy drinker, and this is most likely a contribution to his early death. He was matched in this capacity by his friend, Douglas ‘Tam' Graham, a farmer who sought solace in the bottle from an unhappy marriage. Burns used his drinking partner as a model for the comic poem, Tam O'Shanter, which tells of a drunken Ayrshire farmer who encounters a Witches' Sabbath and escapes with his life, but at the cost of his horse tail. The story was said to be made up by Graham himself to placate his fearsome, but very superstitious, wife after he arrived home one night, worse the wear for drink and with his old mare's tail cropped by some village prankster. This present piece depicts Tam enjoying a riotous night at a local hostilely in the company of his friends, John Anderson and ‘Rabbie' Burns.Rodney Newton - 2013

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £25.00 £25.00
    Buy from Wobbleco Music

    Laughter In The Rain - Sedaka & Cody - Len Jenkins

    In America, this was Neil Sedaka's comeback single. Whilst he had 11 Top-40 hits from 1960-1963, he could not score a hit after the British Invasion of the 60's. His fortunes were such in America that this song was at first released only in England, where it went to No. 15. However, whilst recording with 10cc in London, Sedaka reconnected with his friend Elton John who offered to put out a Sedaka single in America under his own record label, Rocket Records. Since "Laughter In The Rain" was already a hit in the UK, that was the choice, and anything with Elton John's name on it was sure to get some spins. So, later in 1974, "Laughter" was released on Rocket Records with liner notes and endorsements by Elton, and the song took off, becoming his second million-seller 12 years after his first, which was "Breaking Up Is Hard To Do."

  • £25.00

    Canzona XIII

    DescriptionCanzona XIII, also known as Canzon Septimi Octavi Toni a 12, was first published in 1597 as part of a collection entitled 'Symphoniae Sacrae' – this collection was a mixture of instrumental and choral pieces, and also included the famous Sonata Pian'e Forte, probably his best known work.Gabrieli was born in Venice sometime between 1554 and 1557 and studied with the renowned Dutch composer Orlando di Lassus. He also studied with his uncle, Andrea Gabrieli, and eventually succeeded him as the organist and composer at St Mark's Basilica in Venice. Already renowned as a musical centre, Venice became a magnet for composers wishing to study with Gabrieli after 'Symphoniae Sacrae' was published.Like many of his works, this Canzona was written to take advantage of the unique layout of St Mark's, which had galleries on three sides where the musicians could be placed to create novel spatial effects – utterly new and exciting for sixteenth century listeners. Canzona XIII has three different antiphonal 'choirs' and in this arrangement the band is split into three groups to reflect Gabrieli's innovative idea. Ideally the three groups should be clearly separated so the the antiphonal effect comes across clearly, although this will of course depend on the performance space. On no account should the band remain in its normal seated formation!As Gabrieli didn't have any percussionists (and percussion was widely thought inappropriate for music performed in church anyway) there are no percussion parts in this music.This arrangement was first performed by the Coppull and Standish Band conducted by Andrew Baker in 2009.Click here to view a sample PDF score.Duration approximately 2'27".

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days

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  • £50.00

    Capriol Suite - Phillip Littlemore

    Peter Warlock, the pen name of Philip Heseltine, never settled into a conventional career. He had some short lived appointments, including one as a music critic for the Daily Mail, however he did get involved in editing, transcribing and arranging early music manuscripts, and writing a major study of the music of Delius. His first compositions, mainly songs, began to appear in 1917, at which time he had moved to Dublin to avoid possible conscription. It was at this time that he adopted the pseudonym Warlock. In 1922 he completed his first widely acknowledged masterpiece – the song-cycle the Curlew . His period of creativity continued only for a few years culminating in the composition of his most famous work, the Capriol Suite ?in 1925. The original piano duet version of the work was a great success and was quickly followed by the version for string orchestra, from which this arrangement is made. The Capriol Suite is a set of dances in the renaissance style, and is very loosely based on tunes found in Arbeau’s Orchestographie of 1588. The suite consists of six movements: Basse-Danse , is a lively dance for older folk followed by a stately Pavane ; a delicate, yet lively Tordion is followed by Bransles (pronounced ‘Brawl’, a fast country dance which works its way into a frenzy, continuously building in speed and excitement. This is followed by Pieds-en-l’air , perhaps the Suite’s most popular movement, with its beautifully serene lines before the final movement, Matachins , an exhilarating sword dance with its driving rhythm, culminating in violent dissonances bringing the piece to a spirited close. Item Code: TPBB-053 Duration: 10'00" ?

  • £25.00 £25.00
    Buy from Peter Meechan Music

    Cantus (on E.D.) - Peter Meechan

    From Leanne Stamp:"As musicians,I think we really identify ourselves and our existence on being musicians. And we collect these teachings and bondsalong our path. But whendoes it happen? When does that moment happen that someone becomes an integral part of the fabric that makes you who you are? Or when can you pinpointthe momentthat you realize that a person was essential in your path? I don’t think we know. And all too many times it isn’t until someone is gone that we truly reflect and try to figure it out.When Ed De'Ath joined our band (Las Vegas Brass Band) he hadn’t played in over 20 years. He heard the brass band and decided he wanted to go back to playing, and within a few weeks became a member of LVBB.He had grown up playing in Canada, where his father was a brass musician too, and Ed was quite an accomplished young euphonium player competing in competitions and playing in Salvation Army bands.But life happened and it lead him away from playing.Even though I was in LVBB a few years before Edjoined, he quickly became an essential part of what makes that group a family. I spent the better part of a decade playing in the same section as him and then about 5 years sitting next to him on either side.Ed always took a sincere interest in myplaying. Praising the good and giving constructive criticism for improvement. For about two years almost every otherSaturdaywasspent playing duets at his house.I left to study at the RNCM in Manchester, UK, before returning to Las Vegas.My first rehearsal back from the RNCM Ed looked at me said, “here you go kiddo, you’ve earned this solo seat”.There was no ego. Only the wish for me to reach my potential. It was always so apparent with Ed the love he shared for the younger musicians and his desire for them to succeed.Ed lit up the room with his enthusiasm and love for music – he just truly loved being there. That special quality that makes a band a family...he knew and treasured that.And although Ed wasn’t my teacher per say, he was an integral part of my fabric.The way Ed left was sudden. He had been fighting bladder cancer in and off for quite a while but things were looking up. Tests were clear. And then a very aggressive pancreatic cancer stole him very quickly, almost without warning.And I will never forget how I felt getting that call. We decided to have rehearsal that night. And for one reason. Because Ed would’ve wanted us to.I will always be grateful to Ed. Grateful that I got tolearn things from him, receive advice, enjoy his company, and feel his love – part of him is with me whenever I play."

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £49.95

    Ruslan & Ludmilla - Mikhail Glinka

    Glinka's Ruslan & Ludmilla was first performed on December 9, 1842, in St.Petersburg.Once a popular and influential composer, Mikhail Glinka (1804-1857) is primarily remembered today for two operas: A Life for the Tsar (1836) and Ruslan and Ludmilla (1842). The latter, based on the work that brought poet Alexander Pushkin his first success in 1820, seems both a perfect operatic subject and an impossibility.A complicated fairy tale of love overcoming all obstacles, it features a flying dwarf who gets his power from his beard, a fight with a giant disembodied head, a rescue foiled, a slain hero resurrected, and a happy ending with the lovers reunited!Glinka worked intermittently on the Opera for five years and left the composition of the overture to the last minute. Despite the inventiveness of the music and its many memorable melodies, the Opera Ruslan and Ludmilla was a failure. Nevertheless the Overture is a firm favourite and here we have an expertly crafted arrangement for brass band from the pen of Dr Robert Childs.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £95.00 £95.00
    Buy from Superbrass

    KirkFeld

    Grant Kirkhope Grant Kirkhope is a BAFTA nominated British composer who has created the soundtrack for video games that have sold in excess of 30 million copies. From “GoldenEye” to “Banjo-Kazooie”, “Viva Pi?ata” to “Donkey Kong”, “Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning” to “Civilization: Beyond Earth” and “Perfect Dark” to “Castle of Illusion starring Mickey Mouse”. He has also recently scored the feature film “The King’s Daughter” starring Pierce Brosnan and William Hurt and is currently working on “Yooka Laylee” and “Dropzone”. Grant’s score for “Viva Pi?ata” was nominated by BAFTA in the Original Score category in its 2007 awards. Grant is represented by the prestigious Gorfaine/Schwartz Agency by Cheryl Tiano and Kevin Korn. Grant has a degree in music from the Royal Northern College of Music, Manchester, where he majored in classical trumpet, is a green card holder and now lives in Agoura Hills, LA with his wife and two children. “Ian and I first met when we were around 15 years old. We both played in our county orchestra, the North Yorkshire Schools Symphony Orchestra (I was a trumpet player). I think we hit it off straight away, as we were definitely a couple of cheeky kids, if you know what I mean! We both ended up playing in Rowntree Mackintosh Brass Band for a while too which Ian’s Dad, Trevor conducted. We bumped into each other again when we both went for the Shell/LSO Scholarship. I got to the area finals in Manchester so I was pretty pleased with myself but then I saw Ian and I knew it was all over! Of course Ian went on to win and the rest is history. I saw him again when I was attending the Royal Northern College of Music around 1983 by which time Ian had just got the principal chair at the Halle Orchestra. Then I guess 30 something years went by as we both went about our lives and lost touch. We re-kindled our friendship due to his wife really. She emailed me to say it was Ian’s 50th birthday and she was collecting stories from all his friends over the years. After that we got back in touch and then one day on Facebook I got a message from him in typical dry Yorkshire fashion “now then Grant, I had a listen to your music and I think it’s good, how about writing a piece for me ?” I was a little bit unsure at first but of course I loved Ian’s playing and of course I said yes. Over a Skype call in 2016, he asked me what I thought I’d write. I said since I live in LA I’d like to write a “Hollywood” trombone piece. Imagine if John Williams had written a piece for solo trombone, that’s what I’d like to write - well I’d certainly like to try” – Grant Kirkhope

  • £39.95

    Taps in Tempo - Jan Nerneska

    Despite his European name, Jan Berenska was a Midlander and something of a youthful prodigy, playing piano, violin and cello and giving his first broadcast at the age of 15 from Station 5IT (based in Witton, near Birmingham) in the days of crystal sets. He made his professional debut as a multi-instrumentalist in 1919, playing in the pit at London's Drury Lane Theatre for a pantomime. In the 1920s, he became sub-leader of the fledgling City of Birmingham Orchestra (CBO) before forming his own Berenska Pianoforte Quintette in 1930, which broadcast regularly from the BBC'S Birmingham studios. In 1935, he formed a dance band which toured all over the country.His xylophone solo, Taps in Tempo, is dedicated to Leslie Lewis, principal percussionist of the CBO. Born in South Wales, Lewis was a prot?g? of the orchestra's legendary timpanist, Ernest Parsons, and was subsequently engaged by the BBC as percussionist with its Theatre Orchestra in London, only to die tragically of a heart attack at Euston Station on the day he was to take up his new appointment.Taps in Tempo is very typical of the type of xylophone solo heard on innumerable bandstands and in caf?s and variety theatres throughout the 1930s and 1940s. It features a bright, catchy melody, dazzling arpeggios and scales and four-mallet chords to show off the xylophonist's technique. This arrangement was specially created for the virtuoso percussionist, Simone Rebello.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £35.00

    SYMPHONY No.1, Finale from (Brass Band) - Rachmaninoff, Sergei - Littlemore, Phillip

    Rachmaninov composed his First Symphony in 1895, at the age of just 22 years. It received its first performance on March 27, 1897, at a Russian Symphony Society concert in St. Petersburg with Alexander Glazunov conducting. The premiere was not well-received, and Rachmaninov himself blamed Glazunov for a lacklustre approach for beating time rather than finding the music. Some contemporary reports even suggested that Glazunov was inebriated when he took to the stage! Despite the disappointment of the premiere performance, Rachmaninov never destroyed the score but left it behind when he left Russia to settle in the West, eventually it was given up for lost. After the composer's death, a two-piano transcription of the symphony surfaced in Moscow, followed by a set of orchestral parts at the conservatory in Saint Petersburg. In March 1945, the symphony was performed in Moscow for the first time since its 1897 premiere. It was a grand success, and this led to a new and more enthusiastic evaluation of the symphony. In March 1948 it received a similarly successful American premiere and the work proceeded to establish itself in the general repertory. The final movement (Allegro con fuoco) is colourful and grand but not without its darkly contrasting, menacing episodes that intensifies its malevolence. It is a work overflowing with ideas demonstrating a strong, highly individual, and self-assured young talent. Duration: 5:40

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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