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  • £44.00

    Leonardo (Score only) - Philip Wilby

    At his death in 1519 Leonardo da Vinci was the most celebrated artist of his age, but his current celebrity draws much of its potency from his amazingly varied interests in all branches of Renaissance knowledge. Many of his ideas are contained in sketchbooks and Philip Wilby's work takes a sequence of these as a springboard. They traqnslate his visual studies into purely musical terms, and transform their images, tubulent or intimate, mechanistic or heraldic by turns, into a composition which draws its energy from Leonardo's great example. An abridged version of the work - Turba - is also available.

    Estimated dispatch 5-7 working days
  • £56.00

    Leonardo (Parts only) - Philip WIlby

    At his death in 1519 Leonardo da Vinci was the most celebrated artist of his age, but his current celebrity draws much of its potency from his amazingly varied interests in all branches of Renaissance knowledge. Many of his ideas are contained in sketchbooks and Philip Wilby's work takes a sequence of these as a springboard. They traqnslate his visual studies into purely musical terms, and transform their images, tubulent or intimate, mechanistic or heraldic by turns, into a composition which draws its energy from Leonardo's great example. An abridged version of the work - Turba - is also available.

    Estimated dispatch 5-7 working days
  • £60.00

    Montage (Score only) - Peter Graham

    Each of the movements of the symphony take as their starting point forms originating in music of the 16th and 17th centuries. The first, an intrada, introduces the main thematic material (based on the interval of a minor third) in its embryonic state. As the piece progresses, this material is developed and manipulated in a variety of ways. The interval of the third remains central to the overall scheme of the work, even unifying the three movements on a tonal plane (I: F (minor); II: A flat (major); III: C flat (minor). The internal structure of the intrada is an arch form: ABCBA, roughly modelled on the first movement of Concerto for Orchestra by Witold Lutoslawski, to whose memory the movement is dedicated. A chaconne follows - the basic material now transformed into expansive solo lines underpinned by a recurring sequence of five chords (again, a third apart). The movement's structure combines both ternary form and golden section principles and the chaconne's continuous cycle of chords may be visualised as circles. The final movement, a rondo, bears the dramatic weight of the entire work, as the underlying tonal tensions surface. A musical journey ensues, making diversions through lyrical territories as well as through more spiky, jazz-flavoured ones. The aural (and visual) montage is perhaps most apparent towards the climax of the piece, where three keys and polyrhythms sound simultaneously in the upper brass, xylophone, horns, and timpani. The climax itself combines the lyrical music heard earlier with the rondo theme, now presented by cornets and trombones in canon. The teleological thrust of the movement (if not the entire work) can be symbolized by the flight of an arrow, as it steers a predetermined course towards its target. Duration: 16:00

    Estimated dispatch 5-7 working days
  • £72.00

    Montage (Parts only) - Peter Graham

    Each of the movements of the symphony take as their starting point forms originating in music of the 16th and 17th centuries. The first, an intrada, introduces the main thematic material (based on the interval of a minor third) in its embryonic state. As the piece progresses, this material is developed and manipulated in a variety of ways. The interval of the third remains central to the overall scheme of the work, even unifying the three movements on a tonal plane (I: F (minor); II: A flat (major); III: C flat (minor). The internal structure of the intrada is an arch form: ABCBA, roughly modelled on the first movement of Concerto for Orchestra by Witold Lutoslawski, to whose memory the movement is dedicated. A chaconne follows - the basic material now transformed into expansive solo lines underpinned by a recurring sequence of five chords (again, a third apart). The movement's structure combines both ternary form and golden section principles and the chaconne's continuous cycle of chords may be visualised as circles. The final movement, a rondo, bears the dramatic weight of the entire work, as the underlying tonal tensions surface. A musical journey ensues, making diversions through lyrical territories as well as through more spiky, jazz-flavoured ones. The aural (and visual) montage is perhaps most apparent towards the climax of the piece, where three keys and polyrhythms sound simultaneously in the upper brass, xylophone, horns, and timpani. The climax itself combines the lyrical music heard earlier with the rondo theme, now presented by cornets and trombones in canon. The teleological thrust of the movement (if not the entire work) can be symbolized by the flight of an arrow, as it steers a predetermined course towards its target. Duration: 16:00

    Estimated dispatch 5-7 working days
  • £45.00

    Blue Thunder

    Commissioned in 2013 by the National Children's Band of Great Britain for their 10th Anniversary, Blue Thunder takes inspiration from the fast and noisy world of steam locomotives. The Mallard 4468 is a LNER Pacific steam locomotive and was famous for setting the world land speed record (126mph). Blue Thunder (a reference to the train's colour and lightning speed) also marks the 75th anniversary of this world record. The music imitates the sounds and excitement of a steam train on its journey, with added choreography to add some visual excitement. Listen: Duration: 00:04:45 Grade 3.5

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £30.00

    Blue Thunder (Digital Download)

    Commissioned in 2013 by the National Children's Band of Great Britain for their 10th Anniversary, Blue Thunder takes inspiration from the fast and noisy world of steam locomotives. The Mallard 4468 is a LNER Pacific steam locomotive and was famous for setting the world land speed record (126mph). Blue Thunder (a reference to the train's colour and lightning speed) also marks the 75th anniversary of this world record. The music imitates the sounds and excitement of a steam train on its journey, with added choreography to add some visual excitement. Duration: 00:04:45 Grade 3.5

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £57.50

    Burning Love - Dennis Linde

    In the seventies, Elvis Presley gave many concerts with an orchestra that included a large wind section. These concerts were characterised by enthusiasm and a fast tempo. Burning Love was one of the up-tempo numbers where the bass guitar player played an especially important role. The cornets and the trombones can play standing behind the band adding to the visual and dynamic enhancement.

    Estimated dispatch 5-14 working days
  • £104.99

    Theme Park Fun! - Wilco Moerman

    In Theme Park Fun! your orchestra pays a visit to an amusement park. During your visit, you will experience some spectacular rides and attractions this theme park offers. The uniqueness of Theme Park Fun! is the interplay between music and(moving) images. Animations and illustrations support the visual composition (downloadable after ordering a set, on www.gobelinmusic.com).Part 1: The Entrance & Parade [with animation]The opening of the park is a fact. A day fullof fun and pleasure awaits! You and the other visitors will be confronted with all the rides, attractions and adventures the theme park has to offer. Which ride shall we do first?! There is so much to do and experience on this day in the park! Aparade of colorful floats and park figures is passing by.Let the fun begin!Part 2: The Haunted House [with animation]The only ride in the park that is not related to fun, is the Haunted House. Here visitors will be challengedto visit a house full of ghosts, creepy figures and other ominous things. The clock strikes twelve, there is no turning back. Ghosts are whispering, yelling, screaming... Fortunately it is almost one oclock, so we can leave this creepy placequickly.Part 3: The Swinging Galleon [with illustrations]What a huge pirate ship! Each time you swing back and forth, you will feel that weird feeling in your stomach. When you are thrown completely into the top you will have afantastic view over the park, but you can not enjoy it for long. Before you know the ship swings back the other way.Part 4: The Fairy Tale Ride [with illustrations]After all those exciting and spectacular rides and attractions,it is time for a peaceful tour in The Fairy Tale Ride. Surrounded by a fairytale setting, you will discover fable figures, talking animals and colorful designs. Such a beauty and tranquility. Having had this experience, we are ready again for thebig rides in the park!Part 5: The Bumper Cars [with illustrations]Now its time to crawl behind the wheel of the Bumper Cars! Shall we all chase the conductor?! Before you know you are hit by another visitor or you will bumpagainst someone else. In this tough ride you can prove yourself as a real driver, or perhaps as a really bad one.Part 6: The Roller Coaster [with illustrations]The largest, fastest and scariest ride in the park ... we shoulddefinitely do the Roller Coaster! All together in the train, the over-the-shoulder restraints are lowering... be ready to ride. The train leaves the station and is heading for the big lift hill. It will be very scary when the train reaches the topand the train will be plunged down the first drop! Loops, corkscrews and other spectacular coaster elements will follow... Before you know it, the ride of your life is over. Shall we ride it again?!Part 7: Leaving the Park [withanimation]Unfortunately everything comes to an end. This day in the theme park is over, but we have a lot new experiences to talk about! The memories of all the funny and spectacular rides will come up when we walk through the park to theexit. Just one look over the shoulder, the amusement park figures are waving at us. Hopefully we will come back again soon!

    Estimated dispatch 5-14 working days

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  • £80.00

    St. Magnus - Kenneth Downie

    Dedicated to Alastair Massey, an inspirational music teacher. Commissioned by the Scottish Brass Band Association for the 2004 European Brass Band Championships in Glasgow. This music is a set of variations on the tune known as St Magnus, which is attributed to Jeremiah Clarke. Most people will associate it with Thomas Kelly's hymn which begins: "The Head that once was crowned with thorns is crowned with glory now". The tune is very simple, consisting of just two, four-bar phrases. Neither is there much in the way of rhythmic variety, every note being a crotchet with the exception of two quavers, and the last note in each phrase. Within such a simple structure, however, lies considerable strength. THEME The listener is given the opportunity of hearing it twice, in full, at the beginning, starting with one player but soon taken up by the full ensemble. It returns in the middle of the music and is stated again near the end. This has been done quite deliberately in the hope that there will be an appreciation of what material is being developed, by the listener as well as by those with access to the score, who are able to see the visual connections. VARIATION 1 This takes the rhythm of the last part of the theme and also uses the shape of the opening as a recurring figure. The mood is whimsical and skittish, with short, teasing rhythmic figures tossed around the band, and quick interplay with percussion, at a fast tempo. An energetic flourish finishes this variation before the Andante espress. VARIATION 2 This commences with chords related to the opening of Variation 1. The cantabile on solo comets establishes a new, lyrical mood and there is scope for expressive playing in a series of short solo passages. The theme works its way unobtrusively into the texture before a reprise of the solo cornet melody and some more lyrical interchanges between Eb bass, euphonium, flugel horn and comets. The variation ends serenely with clear references to the last phrase of the theme. VARIATION 3 The first idea to dominate is clearly linked to the shape of the theme's first phrase. There is a frenetic feel to much of this variation, with considerable energy and instability created by extensive use of cross-rhythms. A thinning-out of the score marks a clear change to development of the start of the second phrase of the theme. This proves to be short-lived however, and the opening material returns leading to a restatement of the theme, "Maestoso," after which a euphonium cadenza links to Variation 4. VARIATION 4 Here we have some solos for euphonium, cornet, trombone and Eb bass set against a background of horns and baritones presenting a pensive statement of the theme's opening. VARIATION 5 This commences Allegro, with lively work for cornet and euphonium spreading to the whole band before attention focuses on the beginning of the second phrase of the theme which is initially presented in diminution, then in regular rhythm, then in inversion. An increase in tempo coupled with a decrease in volume, requires dexterity and control, with several metrical challenges thrown in for good measure. The same fragment of phrase becomes an ostinato which generates a frenzied climax, punctuated by short, dramatic silence, before the opening figure returns and the music gradually winds down. The tubular bells herald the final return of the theme, in augmentation, marking the start of the Finale. FINALE This features the running semiquavers of the previous variation sounding in counterpoint. A fast, furious coda speeds the work to a conclusion while references to the opening of the theme are still trying to break into the texture of the music. Kenneth Downie

    Estimated dispatch 5-14 working days
  • £44.00

    The Liberty Bell (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Sousa, John Philip - Wilkinson, Keith M.

    This march, written in 1893, was originally destined for inclusion in an operetta but after the composer had witnessed a spectacle called "America" in Chicago, which had as its backdrop a huge painting of the Liberty Bell, it was given the name by which it has become famous. Further recognition has come in more recent years by the adoption of the march as the signature tune for the popular TV programme, Monty Python.The arrangement includes several solos for a large unpitched bell which add aural (and visual) interest. It has been recorded by Brass Band of the Western Reserve, musical director Keith M Wilkinson, on the CD Slides Rule.

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days

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