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  • £21.50

    An Oompah Christmas - Trad - Len Jenkins

    Described as "Rhythmic Seasonal Sillyness", this smashing arrangement throws together a mixture of well known Christmas melodies (Noel, Silent Night, Schneewalzer) as well as some other surprises, wrapped up in a toe tapping waltz style, all finished off with a rendition of "We Wish You A Merry Christmas". Perfect anywhere on a Christmas program and makes a great finale item.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £189.95

    'The New Christmas Collection' - Full Set March Card Size

    The new Christmas Collection carol books contain all the traditional Christmas Carols, with some new 'pop' music arrangements included to add more variety to your carolling this year.

     

    * Note, these are not compatible with the New Christmas Praise books.

    Full list of works in The Christmas Collection:-

    • A child this day is born
    • A Christmas lullaby
    • A great and mighty wonder
    • All I want for Christmas is you
    • All my heart this night rejoices
    • Angels, from the realms of Glory (Come and worship)
    • Angels, from the realms of Glory (Iris)
    • Angels we have heard on high
    • A starry night
    • As with gladness men of old
    • Auld lang syne
    • A virgin most pure
    • Away in a manger (The manger scene)
    • Away in a manger (Traditional)
    • A winter’s tale
    • Bethlehem
    • Brightest and best (Spean)
    • Brightest and best (Traditional)
    • Calypso Carol
    • Carol for the Nativity
    • Carol of the bells
    • Carol of the drum
    • Child of Mary
    • Christians Awake!
    • Christ is born (Il est né)
    • Christ was born on Christmas Day
    • Come and join the celebration
    • Come, children, come quickly
    • Coventry Carol
    • Deck the hall
    • Ding dong! merrily on high
    • Do you hear what I hear?
    • Frosty the snowman
    • Gabriel’s Message
    • Gaudete
    • Glory in the highest
    • Glory in the highest Heaven
    • God of God, the uncreated
    • God rest you merry, gentlemen
    • Good Christian men, rejoice
    • Good King Wenceslas
    • Go, tell it on the mountain!
    • Happy Christmas (War is over)
    • Hark the glad sound!
    • Hark! the herald angels sing
    • Have yourself a merry little Christmas
    • Here we come a-wassailing
    • How far is it to Bethlehem?
    • Huron Carol
    • Infant Holy
    • In the bleak midwinter (Cranham)
    • In the bleak midwinter (Darke)
    • I saw mommy kissing Santa Claus
    • I saw three ships come sailing in
    • It came upon a midnight clear (Traditional)
    • It came upon a midnight clear (Willis)
    • It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas
    • It’s the most wonderful time of the year
    • I wish it could be Christmas everyday
    • I wonder as I wander
    • Jesus, good above all other
    • Jingle Bells
    • Jingle bell rock
    • Joy to the world!
    • Last Christmas
    • Let it snow!
    • Little baby Jesus
    • Little children, wake and listen
    • Little Donkey
    • Little Jesus, sweetly sleep
    • Lo! he comes with clouds descending
    • Long, long ago
    • Love came down at Christmas
    • Mary’s boy child
    • Mary’s Child
    • Masters in this hall
    • Merry Christmas everyone
    • Mistletoe and wine
    • Noel
    • O Christmas tree
    • O come, all ye faithful
    • O come, Immanuel
    • O Heaven-sent King
    • O holy night!
    • O little town of Bethlehem (Christmas Carol)
    • O little town of Bethlehem (Forest Green)
    • O little town of Bethlehem (St Louis)
    • Once in royal David’s city
    • Past three o’clock
    • Patapan
    • Personent Hodie
    • Praise ye the Lord
    • Ring the bells
    • Rise up, shepherd!
    • Rockin’ around the Christmas tree
    • Rudolph, the red-nosed reindeer
    • Sans day carol
    • Santa Claus is comin’ to town
    • Saviour’s Day
    • See, amid the winter’s snow
    • Silent Night!
    • Sleigh Ride
    • Softly the night is sleeping
    • So here it is, merry Christmas
    • Stars are shining
    • Still, still, still
    • Stop the cavalry
    • Sussex Carol
    • Sweet chiming bells
    • Sweet chiming Christmas bells
    • The candle song
    • The cherry tree carol
    • The Christmas song
    • The first Nowell
    • The holly and the ivy
    • The infant King
    • The light has come
    • The shepherds’ farewell
    • The stable door
    • The star in the east
    • The twelve days of Christmas
    • The virgin Mary had a baby boy
    • They all were looking for a king
    • Thou didst leave thy throne
    • Three kings’ march
    • Unto us a boy is born
    • Walking in the air
    • We gather round the manger-bed
    • We three kings of Orient are
    • We wish you a merry Christmas
    • What child is this?
    • When a child is born
    • When Santa got stuck up the chimney
    • Whence is that goodly fragrance flowing?
    • When wise men came seeking
    • While shepherds watched (Cranbrook)
    • While shepherds watched (Handel)
    • While shepherds watched (Winchester Old)
    • White Christmas
    • Who is he?
    • Winter Wonderland
    • Worldwide Christmas message
    • Zither Carol
    • A starry night
    • Christmas Joy
    • Christmas Praise
    • Coventry Carol
    • Infant Holy
    • Mid-winter
    • Rudolph, the red-nosed reindeer
    • The everlasting light
    • To celebrate his birth
    • Yuletide Rag

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £69.95

    Neverland - Christopher Bond

    "All children, except one, grow up" wrote J.M. Barrie about Peter Pan in 1911; the first line and an expression of beautiful melancholy and fantasy, coming to represent one of the best-loved children's stories of the twentieth century. 'Peter & Wendy', as the book was first released, has subsequently been transformed into adaptations for film and stage, with subsequent books based on this iconic tale. In writing this new work for brass band, the composer has taken three of the main themes from J. M. Barrie's book, and used these themes to create new musical material, forming a work in three contrasting sections.I. Journey to NeverlandThe opening of the work, mysterious in its style, reflects the opening chapters of the story - a leafy London street, still in the dead of night - with the music transforming quickly as it builds in texture and momentum - a Journey to Neverland through the night sky; Second Star to the Right and straight on 'til morning. "Then Peter knew that there was not a moment to lose. 'Come,' he cried imperiously, and soared out at once into the night, followed by John and Michael and Wendy. Mr & Mrs Darling and Nana rushed into the nursery too late. The birds were flown."II. The Windows that ClosedThe central section of the work takes its inspiration from the sense of longing throughout the book, mainly by Peter Pan, the Darling Children & The Lost Boys. Distant memories of life before Neverland, memories of the Lost Boys' mothers, and regret at what the children have missed. Peter says "Long ago, I thought like you that my mother would always keep the window open for me; so I stayed away for moons and moons and moons, and then flew back; but the window was barred, for mother had forgotten all about me, and there was another little boy sleeping in my bed."III. Aboard the Pirate ShipThe final section of the work takes its inspiration from the Pirate Ship, and Peter Pan's ultimate battle with its infamous Captain Hook. "In person, he was cadaverous and blackavized, and his hair was dressed in long curls, which at a distance looked like black candles, and gave a singularly threatening expression to his handsome countenance. His eyes were the blue of the forget-me-not, and of a profound melancholy, save when he was plunging his hook into you, at which time two red spots appeared in them and lit them up horribly."

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £83.00

    A Bournemouth Suite - Benjamin Tubb

    Bournemouth Suite was written by Benjamin Tubb in 2005, when the composer was just 17 years of age. After spending many school holiday weeks with his grandparents in the coastal town of Bournmouth, it was obvious that these experiences would make a great basis for a composition.This testpiece is split into three separate movements: Balloon Ride, The Pier at Night and The BIC. Each movement has its own unique character, although there are ideas shared by all three throughout, one of which is the opening syncopation.Balloon RideThe First movement, Balloon Ride, describes a journey on "The Bournemouth Eye", a tethered hot air balloon that takes you up 500 feet. It's located in the middle of the town centre, which enables you to see surrounding countryside for up to 20 miles! The movement begins rather ominously as the balloon raises from the ground which leads into a more lively section caharacteresed by the repeating quavers in the lower brass and woodblock. The movement ends in much the same way as it started - signalling the return to terra firma.The Pier At NightDuring the summer there are several large firework displays in the town centre. The second movement, The Pier At Night descirbes an evening spent on the beach in deckchairs watching the montage of colours in the night-time sky. With demanding solos for horn and cornet, as well as exposed playing spread throughout the band, this slow movement will really test a band's expressive and lyrical playing.The 'BIC'The Bournemouth INternational Centre, also known as "The BIC" is one of Bournemouth's most visited attractions, and regularly hosts shows such as 'Riverdance' and pantomimes. Inside is a world of entertainment and the centre itself is just a stone's throw from both "The Bournemouth Eye" and the Pier. The 3rd movement has been written to describe the buzz of activity surrounding the BIC, and the entire works ends with the same syncopated motif from the beginning.A Bournemouth Suite was set as the 'set-test' at the Pontins Brass Band Championships 2009.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £49.95

    The Dark Side of the Moon - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    This piece was commissioned by Dr. Nicholas Childs and Black Dyke Band on behalf of Rotary International and received its world premi?re performance at St. David's Hall, Cardiff on Saturday 27th January 2007. It is dedicated to the composer's father, Harry Cooper.The music was selected by the National Contesting Council as the 3rd section test piece for the 2008 Regional Brass Band Championships of Great Britain.A Note from the Composer...Have you ever thought of a holiday destination, tourist attraction, event, place, site or period in history and thought 'I wonder what it would be like?' - somwhere you have never been and can only let your imagination run wild on. What would the place be like, and all the things surrounding it such as the mood, feelings you get experiencing it, the temperature? Who would be there and what you would see? This piece is my musical imagination of the dark side of the moon. I know from news reports, the internet and other footage that the moon is a very desolate place, very barren and rugged. So from the start the piece gives the listener a musical picture of the rugged landscape with little light and warmth.However, the one place that has had me thinking about is the side of the moon that we don't see in our night skies, the side of the moon with no sun and no light pollution from civilisation. I can only imagine the eeriness one would feel being stood in complete darkness on the moon's surface looking around.As you slowly explore the surroundings and your eyes drift up to the night sky, there is an awesome sight unfolding in front of you - countless stars and galaxies, planets and different solar systems and all right in front of you glistening from the light of the sun beaming from the other side of the moon. The Dark Side of the Moon portrays a musical picture of the whole experience as seen in my imagination taking the listener from the rugged landscape to the awesome beauty that sits endlessly in front of you.Paul Lovatt-Cooper, September 2007

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £49.95

    The Dark Side Of The Moon - Score & Parts - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    This piece was commissioned by Dr. Nicholas Childs and Black Dyke Band on behalf of Rotary International and received its world premi?re performance at St. David's Hall, Cardiff on Saturday 27th January 2007. It is dedicated to the composer's father, Harry Cooper.The music was selected by the National Contesting Council as the 3rd section test piece for the 2008 Regional Brass Band Championships of Great Britain. A Note from the Composer...Have you ever thought of a holiday destination, tourist attraction, event, place, site or period in history and thought 'I wonder what it would be like?' - somwhere you have never been and can only let your imagination run wild on. What would the place be like, and all the things surrounding it such as the mood, feelings you get experiencing it, the temperature? Who would be there and what you would see? This piece is my musical imagination of the dark side of the moon. I know from news reports, the internet and other footage that the moon is a very desolate place, very barren and rugged. So from the start the piece gives the listener a musical picture of the rugged landscape with little light and warmth.However, the one place that has had me thinking about is the side of the moon that we don't see in our night skies, the side of the moon with no sun and no light pollution from civilisation. I can only imagine the eeriness one would feel being stood in complete darkness on the moon's surface looking around.As you slowly explore the surroundings and your eyes drift up to the night sky, there is an awesome sight unfolding in front of you - countless stars and galaxies, planets and different solar systems and all right in front of you glistening from the light of the sun beaming from the other side of the moon. The Dark Side of the Moon portrays a musical picture of the whole experience as seen in my imagination taking the listener from the rugged landscape to the awesome beauty that sits endlessly in front of you.Paul Lovatt-Cooper, September 2007

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £24.95

    The Dark Side Of The Moon - Score Only - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    This piece was commissioned by Dr. Nicholas Childs and Black Dyke Band on behalf of Rotary International and received its world premi?re performance at St. David's Hall, Cardiff on Saturday 27th January 2007. It is dedicated to the composer's father, Harry Cooper.The music was selected by the National Contesting Council as the 3rd section test piece for the 2008 Regional Brass Band Championships of Great Britain. A Note from the Composer...Have you ever thought of a holiday destination, tourist attraction, event, place, site or period in history and thought 'I wonder what it would be like?' - somwhere you have never been and can only let your imagination run wild on. What would the place be like, and all the things surrounding it such as the mood, feelings you get experiencing it, the temperature? Who would be there and what you would see? This piece is my musical imagination of the dark side of the moon. I know from news reports, the internet and other footage that the moon is a very desolate place, very barren and rugged. So from the start the piece gives the listener a musical picture of the rugged landscape with little light and warmth.However, the one place that has had me thinking about is the side of the moon that we don't see in our night skies, the side of the moon with no sun and no light pollution from civilisation. I can only imagine the eeriness one would feel being stood in complete darkness on the moon's surface looking around.As you slowly explore the surroundings and your eyes drift up to the night sky, there is an awesome sight unfolding in front of you - countless stars and galaxies, planets and different solar systems and all right in front of you glistening from the light of the sun beaming from the other side of the moon. The Dark Side of the Moon portrays a musical picture of the whole experience as seen in my imagination taking the listener from the rugged landscape to the awesome beauty that sits endlessly in front of you.Paul Lovatt-Cooper, September 2007

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    A Slow Ride in a Static Machine - Phil Lawrence

    A Slow Ride in a Static Machine was inspired some time ago when my (late) Father came to visit me "down in London" as he put it. It was based not on one of his circular mishaps, but on several! He was always directed carefully, but refused to carry a map in the car! At one time when I lived in North London I would meet him outside the capital, and he would then follow be back to my place, but after I moved to East London I made him bite the navigational bullet and transverse the 'M25 Orbital'. His main problem seemed to be getting off this mesmerising circular cark park. He would often phone (in a weary tone) from the Dartford Tunnel (which is 5 junctions past the one he needed to get off at), asking me to, "bring him in" so to speak. I would always refuse. And then, he would do the opposite (especially when travelling at night), he would phone me up from near Cambridge (he'd gone the wrong way up the M11 away from London by 45 miles), and would ask where he was!The title is obviously a play on John Adams' composition, A Short Ride In A Fast Machine. This quirky tone poem starts as a wind-up by using those unwanted intervals of augmented 4th's and minor 9th's & 7th's in the main tune, before hearing the road works, the juggernauts multi horns, fender-benders, ambulance and police sirens! This then all works to a back beat on kit. The wind-up start gets to an almost Go-Go 1960's Disco middle section (the nostalgic hay-days of the open road), where our wind-up tune falls into place and we all relax as we can now drive at 42.1 mph! We DC, and then get into a right car mess in the Coda! Phil Lawrence.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £34.95

    SLOW RIDE IN A STATIC MACHINE, A (Brass Band) - Lawrence, Phil

    A Slow Ride in a Static Machine was inspired some time ago when my (late) Father came to visit me "down in London" as he put it. It was based not on one of his circular mishaps, but on several! He was always directed carefully, but refused to carry a map in the car! At one time when I lived in North London I would meet him outside the capital, and he would then follow be back to my place, but after I moved to East London I made him bite the navigational bullet and transverse the 'M25 Orbital'. His main problem seemed to be getting off this mesmerising circular cark park. He would often phone (in a weary tone) from the Dartford Tunnel (which is 5 junctions past the one he needed to get off at), asking me to, "bring him in" so to speak. I would always refuse. And then, he would do the opposite (especially when travelling at night), he would phone me up from near Cambridge (he'd gone the wrong way up the M11 away from London by 45 miles), and would ask where he was!The title is obviously a play on John Adams' composition, A Short Ride In A Fast Machine. This quirky tone poem starts as a wind-up by using those unwanted intervals of augmented 4th's and minor 9th's & 7th's in the main tune, before hearing the road works, the juggernauts multi horns, fender-benders, ambulance and police sirens! This then all works to a back beat on kit. The wind-up start gets to an almost Go-Go 1960's Disco middle section (the nostalgic hay-days of the open road), where our wind-up tune falls into place and we all relax as we can now drive at 42.1 mph! We DC, and then get into a right car mess in the Coda!Phil Lawrence.Duration:4:00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    Three Burns Portraits - Rodney Newton

    Robert Burns (1759-1796) was one of the most colourful literary figures of the 18th Century. The son of a tenant farmer, he was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, and earned a living variously as a farmer, flax dresser and exercise man, gradually establishing himself as a poet, lyricist and collector of folksongs. A charismatic character, by the time of his death he had become Scotland's best known and best-loved poet. This work depicts three characters from his personal life who also figure in his poetry. Although Burns intended much of his verse to be sung, and even wrote tunes himself for many of his lyrics, all the melodies in this work are original.I John AndersonJohn Anderson (1759-1832) was an Ayrshire carpenter and close friend to Robert Burns, who immortalised Anderson in his affectionate poem John Anderson Ma Jo, which imagines both men in old age (although Burns was only 37 when he died). Anderson is reputed to have made Robert Burns' coffin and survived the wrecking of the paddle steamer Cornet at Craignish Point near Oban during a storm in 1820, an event incorporated into this movement. This is a picture of a tough, resilient Scot who meets the storms of Life head-on.II Mary CampbellRobert Burns had numerous love affairs, sometimes with more than one woman at a time. Mary Campbell, a sailor's daughter from the highland district of Dunoon, had entered service with a family in Ayrshire when she met Burns. Although involved with another woman at the time, Burns was smitten with Campbell and there is evidence to suggest that he planned to emigrate to Jamaica with Mary. However, nothing came of this wild scheme and Mary, fearing disgrace and scandal left the area but not before Burns had enshrined her in at least two poems, Highland Mary and To Mary Campbell. Significantly, the first line of the latter runs, "Will ye go to the Indies, my Mary, and leave auld Scotia's Shore?" (His ardent pleading can be heard in the middle section of the movement). Mary's music paints a portrait of a graceful young lady who had the presence of mind not to be entirely won over by the charms of Robert Burns.III Douglas GrahamBurns was a heavy drinker, and this is most likely a contribution to his early death. He was matched in this capacity by his friend, Douglas ‘Tam' Graham, a farmer who sought solace in the bottle from an unhappy marriage. Burns used his drinking partner as a model for the comic poem, Tam O'Shanter, which tells of a drunken Ayrshire farmer who encounters a Witches' Sabbath and escapes with his life, but at the cost of his horse tail. The story was said to be made up by Graham himself to placate his fearsome, but very superstitious, wife after he arrived home one night, worse the wear for drink and with his old mare's tail cropped by some village prankster. This present piece depicts Tam enjoying a riotous night at a local hostilely in the company of his friends, John Anderson and ‘Rabbie' Burns.Rodney Newton - 2013

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days