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  • £119.00

    Images of the Millennium - Full 2 Band Version - H. Snell

    Richard Evans' request was that the work should mirror aspects of the history of banding while also looking forward. 1. FANFARE. In this movement the work is introduced.2. TOCCATA: CONTEST DAY. The gathering together of players and audience for a contest day is treated in a busy, sometimes jazzy manner.3. PASTORALE: 'A GREEN AND PLEASANT LAND'. Looking back to the third and fourth decades of the nineteenth century and the rapid birth of brass bands and banding, this short Intermezzo invokes the popular picture postcard view of the past. Images of warfare appear briefly as a reminiscence of Britain's continuing military domination of the world, with Trafalgar and Waterloo still echoing on the horizon.4. MUSIC FOR A SILENT FILM: AN OLD MAN REMEMBERS PETERLOO. The reality of 'England's green and pleasant land' was somewhat different. On August 19th 1819 the Stalybridge Band was playing at a political meeting in St Peter's Fields in Manchester, later to become the site of the Free Trade Hall. The local Magistrate, sent in the cavalry. Shots were fired into the crowd, 11 people were killed and 500 injured. I present the scenes as followsthe holiday crowd in St Peter's Field entertained by the Band the unprovoked attack by the militia the flight from St Peter's Fieldthe funeral wake the lament5. SCHERZO: THE CRYSTAL PALACE. Only a few decades later brass bands were regular visitors to the greatest concert halls in the country. I see the Bands and their followers descending on London in trains and charabancs. 6. DREAM-NOCTURNE. As if in a trance, an unending musical line is passed around the ensemble to celebrate the players who possessed, and still possess, the sound and phrasing to enthrall the listener.7. ODYSSEY. The way forward now beckons. The music passes through conflict, struggle and turmoil on its way to release, resolution and finally to triumph.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £25.00

    AND THE GLORY, THE GLORY OF THE LORD (from Messiah) (SATB Chorus with Brass Band) - Handel, George Frideric - Littlemore, Phillip

    Handel's Messiah was composed in 1741, receiving it's premiere in Dublin a year later. And The Glory, The Glory Of The Lord is the fourth movement of the oratorio, and the first in which the choir sings. There are no choral parts included with the set, however it works with all the major editions of vocal score.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £119.00

    Between the Two Rivers (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Sparke, Philip

    Between the Two Rivers was commissioned by Fanfare Prins Hendrik, from Aalst in the Netherlands. The title derives from the fact that the town of Aalst lies between two tributaries of the River Dommel. The community is a highly religious one, so the famous Luther chorale, Ein' Feste Burg, was an obvious choice for Philip Sparke to use as the theme for this new work. It takes the form of a theme with four contrasting variations. Variation 1 is a moto perpetuo, variation 2 has a slower march like feel, variation 3 is a sinister slow movement and the final variation is in the form of a lyrical fugue. Between The Two Rivers is sure to become a major work in modern brass band repertoire.Duration: 15:00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £61.00

    Hail the Dragon! (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

    Its title, Hail the Dragon!, references a work Philip Sparke wrote in 1984, The Year of the Dragon. The piece opens with a lively and energetic fanfare. The mood becomes more subdued in the centre section as the cornet introduces a new theme that builds to an emotional climax. This leads into a recap of the opening fanfare which acts as a type of descant to short quotations from the last movement of The Year of the Dragon before reaching a thunderous finale. 04:45

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £13.95

    Hail the Dragon! (Brass Band - Score only)

    Its title, Hail the Dragon!, references a work Philip Sparke wrote in 1984, The Year of the Dragon. The piece opens with a lively and energetic fanfare. The mood becomes more subdued in the centre section as the cornet introduces a new theme that builds to an emotional climax. This leads into a recap of the opening fanfare which acts as a type of descant to short quotations from the last movement of The Year of the Dragon before reaching a thunderous finale. 04:45

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £59.95

    PLANTAGENETS, The (Brass Band Set - Score and Parts) - Gregson, Edward

    2013 National Champsionship Area Qualifying Contest - 2nd Section. The Plantagenets was composed for the Championship Section of the Regional contests of the National Brass Band Championships of Great Britain 1973. The work is not intended to be programme music but rather it tries to portray the mood and feelings of an age, that of the House of Plantagenet, which lasted from the middle of the 12th century to the end of the 14th century. To many, it conjures up an Age of Chivalry and this is represented by fanfare motifs which occur throughout the work in varied form. The opening thematic figure, rising through the band in thirds and followed by the fanfares, is important as nearly all the subsequent material is based upon it. There follows two themes, the second of which is lyrical and introduced by horns. In the long, slow middle section, a new theme is introduced by a solo horn (recurring on cornet and euphonium in canon) and is developed at some length. A lively fugato scherzino, however, leads to a recapitulation of the opening section music and the work ends with a maestoso statement of the slow movement theme. A final reference to the fanfares ends the work.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £64.95

    The Flowers of the Forest (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Bennett, Richard Rodney - Hindmarsh, Paul

    In a preface to the score, the composer explains that ‘the folk song The Flowers of the Forest is believed to date from 1513, the time if the battle of Flodden, in the course of which the archers of the Forest (a part of Scotland) were killed almost to a man’. Bennett had already used the same tune in his Six Scottish Folksongs (1972) for soprano, tenor and piano, and it is the arrangement he made then that forms the starting-point for the brass-band piece. A slow introduction (Poco Adagio) presents the folk song theme three times in succession - on solo cornet, on solo cornets and tenor horns, and on muted ripieno cornets in close harmony - after which the work unfolds through five sections and a coda. Although played without a break, each of these five sections has its own identity, developing elements of the tune somewhat in the manner of variations, but with each arising from and evolving into the next. The first of these sections (Con moto, tranquillo) is marked by an abrupt shift of tonality, and makes much of the slow rises and falls characteristic of the tune itself. The tempo gradually increases, to arrive at a scherzando section (Vivo) which includes the first appearance of the theme in its inverted form. A waltz-like trio is followed by a brief return of the scherzando, leading directly to a second, more extended, scherzo (con brio) based on a lilting figure no longer directly related to the theme. As this fades, a single side drum introduces an element of more overtly martial tension (Alla Marcia) and Bennett says that, from this point on, he was thinking of Debussy’s tribute to the memory of an unknown soldier (in the second movement of En Blanc et noir, for two pianos). Bennett’s march gradually gathers momentum, eventually culminating in a short-lived elegiac climax (Maestoso) before the music returns full-circle to the subdued melancholy of the opening. The work ends with a haunting pianissimo statement of the original tune.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    The Flowers of the Forest (Brass Band - Score only) - Bennett, Richard Rodney - Hindmarsh, Paul

    In a preface to the score, the composer explains that ‘the folk song The Flowers of the Forest is believed to date from 1513, the time if the battle of Flodden, in the course of which the archers of the Forest (a part of Scotland) were killed almost to a man’. Bennett had already used the same tune in his Six Scottish Folksongs (1972) for soprano, tenor and piano, and it is the arrangement he made then that forms the starting-point for the brass-band piece. A slow introduction (Poco Adagio) presents the folk song theme three times in succession - on solo cornet, on solo cornets and tenor horns, and on muted ripieno cornets in close harmony - after which the work unfolds through five sections and a coda. Although played without a break, each of these five sections has its own identity, developing elements of the tune somewhat in the manner of variations, but with each arising from and evolving into the next. The first of these sections (Con moto, tranquillo) is marked by an abrupt shift of tonality, and makes much of the slow rises and falls characteristic of the tune itself. The tempo gradually increases, to arrive at a scherzando section (Vivo) which includes the first appearance of the theme in its inverted form. A waltz-like trio is followed by a brief return of the scherzando, leading directly to a second, more extended, scherzo (con brio) based on a lilting figure no longer directly related to the theme. As this fades, a single side drum introduces an element of more overtly martial tension (Alla Marcia) and Bennett says that, from this point on, he was thinking of Debussy’s tribute to the memory of an unknown soldier (in the second movement of En Blanc et noir, for two pianos). Bennett’s march gradually gathers momentum, eventually culminating in a short-lived elegiac climax (Maestoso) before the music returns full-circle to the subdued melancholy of the opening. The work ends with a haunting pianissimo statement of the original tune.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £12.00

    Pre-Order: The World Rejoicing - Study Score - Edward Gregson

    In searching for a common link between the brass band traditions of the various European countries that commissioned this work, I considered the fact that hymns have always played an important role in the relationship that brass bands have with their particular communities; and thus I turned to a well-known Lutheran chorale, Nun danket alle Gott (Now thank we all our God), written around 1636 by Martin Rinkart, with the melody attributed to Johann Cr?ger. A number of composers have incorporated this chorale into their music, most famously J.S.Bach in his Cantatas no. 79 and 192, and Mendelssohn in the Lobsegang movement of his 2nd Symphony (the harmonization of which is usually used when this hymn is sung).It seemed fitting therefore for me to return to a compositional form I have used many times before (Variations) and to write a work based on this hymn. I have used it in a similar way to that which I employed in my Variations on Laudate Dominum of 1976 – that is, rather than writing a set of variations using elaborations of the complete tune, I have taken various phrases from the chorale and used them within the context of other musical material, applying an overall symphonic process of continuous variation and development. The structure, or sub-divisions of the work, which is through composed and plays without a break, is as follows: Prelude, Capriccio, La Danza 1, Processional, La Danza 2, Arias and Duets, Fuga Burlesca, Chorale, and Postlude.The work is also partly autobiographical – in the manner say of Strauss’s Ein Heldenleben – in that I have incorporated into the score brief quotations from many of my other major works for brass band. In that respect, The World Rejoicing sums up a particular facet of my life as a composer, and reflects the admiration I have always had for what is surely one of the great amateur music-making traditions in the world.The World Rejoicing is dedicated ‘in loving memory of my brother’, Bramwell Logan Gregson, who sadly passed away in the Autumn of 2018.Edward Gregson

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £20.00

    Air from the Suite in D - Johann Sebastian Bach

    Johann Sebastian Bach’s Suite No. 3 in D, from a set of four such suites, was recreated from a set of autographed parts ?from around the 1730s, as no score has survived. The music is believed to date from some years prior to that and is possibly derived from an earlier work than that. The Air , perhaps the most famous movement from all the Suites, has been arranged as a tenor horn feature, although there is no part for cornets, bass trombone, euphoniums or percussion in this transcription. Iten Code: TPBB-059 Duration: c. 3 minutes

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days