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  • £38.00

    Hymn at Sunrise (Score only) - Ray Steadman-Allen

    The idea for this work was prompted by a poem - Hymn Before Sunrise - which describes the majesty of a mountain in darkness, the sounds of a nearby waterfall and so on. Nothing came of the exposure to these pictures except for general thoughts about the dawn of day and a series of movements expressing a personal response to the wonder of creation in an imaginary moment in time. The movement titles, which were added later, are intended to underline a prevailing sense of worship, wonder and exaltation. The music is pure, not pictoral, though listeners may conjure their own images. An actual hymn - Tallis' Cannon - is incorporated. There are five movements: 1. Thanksgiving: A short prelude in two parts. First a brief passage of 'dawn music' before things become more vigorous: fanfare-like music ushers in the trombone section's presentation of the Tallis tune. A broad band version concludes the movement. 2. De Profundis: A slow movement shot through with anxious questionings featuring flugel and trombone. The mood lightens a little in the centre where the soprano cornet is featured and the movement ends serenely. 3. Celebration is characterised by rhythmic drive, this is buoyant with plenty of incident pointed up by the percussion. 4. Invocation: Melodic in nature and sober in mood, the first section is a series of short solos mingled with chorale-like statements. Central to the movement is a chorale-prelude style presentation of the Tallis tune. The third section reintroduces the earlier solo music by the full ensemble. Dissolving, the music enters the last movement without a break. 5. Paean: Marked allegro con spirito there is, quite rightly, a fair amount of fun in the rejoicing. Snatches of Tallis are heard, then comes a gentle passage with a cornet solo leading to fanfare music and recapitulation. Two recitatives are succeeded by a coda which brings the work to a sonorous and exultant conclusion.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £48.00

    Hymn at Sunrise (Parts only) - Ray Steadman-Allen

    The idea for this work was prompted by a poem - Hymn Before Sunrise - which describes the majesty of a mountain in darkness, the sounds of a nearby waterfall and so on. Nothing came of the exposure to these pictures except for general thoughts about the dawn of day and a series of movements expressing a personal response to the wonder of creation in an imaginary moment in time. The movement titles, which were added later, are intended to underline a prevailing sense of worship, wonder and exaltation. The music is pure, not pictoral, though listeners may conjure their own images. An actual hymn - Tallis' Cannon - is incorporated. There are five movements: 1. Thanksgiving: A short prelude in two parts. First a brief passage of 'dawn music' before things become more vigorous: fanfare-like music ushers in the trombone section's presentation of the Tallis tune. A broad band version concludes the movement. 2. De Profundis: A slow movement shot through with anxious questionings featuring flugel and trombone. The mood lightens a little in the centre where the soprano cornet is featured and the movement ends serenely. 3. Celebration is characterised by rhythmic drive, this is buoyant with plenty of incident pointed up by the percussion. 4. Invocation: Melodic in nature and sober in mood, the first section is a series of short solos mingled with chorale-like statements. Central to the movement is a chorale-prelude style presentation of the Tallis tune. The third section reintroduces the earlier solo music by the full ensemble. Dissolving, the music enters the last movement without a break. 5. Paean: Marked allegro con spirito there is, quite rightly, a fair amount of fun in the rejoicing. Snatches of Tallis are heard, then comes a gentle passage with a cornet solo leading to fanfare music and recapitulation. Two recitatives are succeeded by a coda which brings the work to a sonorous and exultant conclusion.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £84.95

    Cornet Concerto (Gregson) (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Gregson, Edward

    The Cornet Concerto was commissioned by Black Dyke Band for their principal cornet, Richard Marshall, and was premiered at the European Brass Band Festival’s Gala Concert in Lille, France, on 30 April 2016 by the same performers, conducted by Nicholas Childs.It is challenging work, both musically and technically, and one that exploits the wide range of the instrument’s capabilities. Lasting for some 17 minutes, it is in the usual three movements: Sonata, Intermezzo (subtitled ‘Of More Distant Memories’) and Rondo.The first movement presents four main ideas:Cadenzas (which recur throughout the movement, and indeed appear at the end of the work); a fast and rhythmically energetic motive; Bugle calls (echoing the ancestor of the cornet), and a lyrical and expressive melody, full of yearning. These four ideas are juxtaposed within the broad shape of a Sonata form structure, although here the word ‘Sonata’ is used in its original meaning of ‘sounding together’.The second movement is music in search of a theme, which eventually comes at the end of the movement. In the middle section there are brief quotations, albeit mostly hidden, from three cornet solos written by the Swedish/American composer Erik Leidzen for the Salvation Army in the 1940s and 50s; these are solos I loved as a teenager, and my use of them is by way of tribute, not imitation – a sort of memory bank, just as the main theme of the movement, when it eventually comes, is reminiscent of the tune from my earlier work for brass band, ‘Of Distant Memories’.The final Rondo, the shortest of the three movements, is a lively and ‘fleet-of foot’ Scherzo, its main theme full of cascading arpeggios, but with a contrasting lyrical second theme intertwined in the structure. There is much interplay between soloist and band in the development of the music, but eventually a brief reprise of the opening cadenzas leads to an exciting and climactic coda.Click here for the piano reduction

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £39.95

    Cornet Concerto (Gregson) (Brass Band - Score only) - Gregson, Edward

    The Cornet Concerto was commissioned by Black Dyke Band for their principal cornet, Richard Marshall, and was premiered at the European Brass Band Festival’s Gala Concert in Lille, France, on 30 April 2016 by the same performers, conducted by Nicholas Childs.It is challenging work, both musically and technically, and one that exploits the wide range of the instrument’s capabilities. Lasting for some 17 minutes, it is in the usual three movements: Sonata, Intermezzo (subtitled ‘Of More Distant Memories’) and Rondo.The first movement presents four main ideas:Cadenzas (which recur throughout the movement, and indeed appear at the end of the work); a fast and rhythmically energetic motive; Bugle calls (echoing the ancestor of the cornet), and a lyrical and expressive melody, full of yearning. These four ideas are juxtaposed within the broad shape of a Sonata form structure, although here the word ‘Sonata’ is used in its original meaning of ‘sounding together’.The second movement is music in search of a theme, which eventually comes at the end of the movement. In the middle section there are brief quotations, albeit mostly hidden, from three cornet solos written by the Swedish/American composer Erik Leidzen for the Salvation Army in the 1940s and 50s; these are solos I loved as a teenager, and my use of them is by way of tribute, not imitation – a sort of memory bank, just as the main theme of the movement, when it eventually comes, is reminiscent of the tune from my earlier work for brass band, ‘Of Distant Memories’.The final Rondo, the shortest of the three movements, is a lively and ‘fleet-of foot’ Scherzo, its main theme full of cascading arpeggios, but with a contrasting lyrical second theme intertwined in the structure. There is much interplay between soloist and band in the development of the music, but eventually a brief reprise of the opening cadenzas leads to an exciting and climactic coda.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £46.00

    Montage (Score only) - Peter Graham

    Each of the movements of the symphony take as their starting point forms originating in music of the 16th and 17th centuries. The first, an intrada, introduces the main thematic material (based on the interval of a minor third) in its embryonic state. As the piece progresses, this material is developed and manipulated in a variety of ways. The interval of the third remains central to the overall scheme of the work, even unifying the three movements on a tonal plane (I: F (minor); II: A flat (major); III: C flat (minor). The internal structure of the intrada is an arch form: ABCBA, roughly modelled on the first movement of Concerto for Orchestra by Witold Lutoslawski, to whose memory the movement is dedicated. A chaconne follows - the basic material now transformed into expansive solo lines underpinned by a recurring sequence of five chords (again, a third apart). The movement's structure combines both ternary form and golden section principles and the chaconne's continuous cycle of chords may be visualised as circles. The final movement, a rondo, bears the dramatic weight of the entire work, as the underlying tonal tensions surface. A musical journey ensues, making diversions through lyrical territories as well as through more spiky, jazz-flavoured ones. The aural (and visual) montage is perhaps most apparent towards the climax of the piece, where three keys and polyrhythms sound simultaneously in the upper brass, xylophone, horns, and timpani. The climax itself combines the lyrical music heard earlier with the rondo theme, now presented by cornets and trombones in canon. The teleological thrust of the movement (if not the entire work) can be symbolized by the flight of an arrow, as it steers a predetermined course towards its target. Duration: 16:00

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £56.00

    Montage (Parts only) - Peter Graham

    Each of the movements of the symphony take as their starting point forms originating in music of the 16th and 17th centuries. The first, an intrada, introduces the main thematic material (based on the interval of a minor third) in its embryonic state. As the piece progresses, this material is developed and manipulated in a variety of ways. The interval of the third remains central to the overall scheme of the work, even unifying the three movements on a tonal plane (I: F (minor); II: A flat (major); III: C flat (minor). The internal structure of the intrada is an arch form: ABCBA, roughly modelled on the first movement of Concerto for Orchestra by Witold Lutoslawski, to whose memory the movement is dedicated. A chaconne follows - the basic material now transformed into expansive solo lines underpinned by a recurring sequence of five chords (again, a third apart). The movement's structure combines both ternary form and golden section principles and the chaconne's continuous cycle of chords may be visualised as circles. The final movement, a rondo, bears the dramatic weight of the entire work, as the underlying tonal tensions surface. A musical journey ensues, making diversions through lyrical territories as well as through more spiky, jazz-flavoured ones. The aural (and visual) montage is perhaps most apparent towards the climax of the piece, where three keys and polyrhythms sound simultaneously in the upper brass, xylophone, horns, and timpani. The climax itself combines the lyrical music heard earlier with the rondo theme, now presented by cornets and trombones in canon. The teleological thrust of the movement (if not the entire work) can be symbolized by the flight of an arrow, as it steers a predetermined course towards its target. Duration: 16:00

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £94.00

    Montage - Peter Graham

    Each of the movements of the symphony take as their starting point forms originating in music of the 16th and 17th centuries.The first, an intrada, introduces the main thematic material (based on the interval of a minor third) in its embryonic state. As the piece progresses, this material is developed and manipulated in a variety of ways. The interval of the third remains central to the overall scheme of the work, even unifying the three movements on a tonal plane (I: F (minor); II: A flat (major); III: C flat (minor). The internal structure of the intrada is an arch form: ABCBA, roughly modelled on the first movement of Concerto for Orchestra by Witold Lutoslawski, to whose memory the movement is dedicated.A chaconne follows – the basic material now transformed into expansive solo lines underpinned by a recurring sequence of five chords (again, a third apart). The movement’s structure combines both ternary form and golden section principles and the chaconne’s continuous cycle of chords may be visualised as circles.The final movement, a rondo, bears the dramatic weight of the entire work, as the underlying tonal tensions surface. A musical journey ensues, making diversions through lyrical territories as well as through more spiky, jazz-flavoured ones. The aural (and visual) montage is perhaps most apparent towards the climax of the piece, where three keys and polyrhythms sound simultaneously in the upper brass, xylophone, horns, and timpani. The climax itself combines the lyrical music heard earlier with the rondo theme, now presented by cornets and trombones in canon.The teleological thrust of the movement (if not the entire work) can be symbolized by the flight of an arrow, as it steers a predetermined course towards its target.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £38.00

    Sinfonietta (Score only) - James Curnow

    Sinfonietta for Brass Band is basically a short symphony in three movements. The maestoso opening of the first movement introduces the melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic material from which the entire work is structured. The first movement, allegro vivace, is a brilliant capriccio built upon two contrasting melodic lines that are developed throughout the movement. The form is sonata-allegro and it creates an atmosphere of energy and drive. The percussion section opens the second movement and presents the underlying rhythmic ostinato on which this brief but expressive siciliano (pastorale) is developed. Movement three is a rollicking rondo that challenges the technical and rhythmic control of the whol;e ensemble. The brilliant closing fanfare is based on material which has been developed in all three movements.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £48.00

    Sinfonietta (Parts only) - James Curnow

    Sinfonietta for Brass Band is basically a short symphony in three movements. The maestoso opening of the first movement introduces the melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic material from which the entire work is structured. The first movement, allegro vivace, is a brilliant capriccio built upon two contrasting melodic lines that are developed throughout the movement. The form is sonata-allegro and it creates an atmosphere of energy and drive. The percussion section opens the second movement and presents the underlying rhythmic ostinato on which this brief but expressive siciliano (pastorale) is developed. Movement three is a rollicking rondo that challenges the technical and rhythmic control of the whol;e ensemble. The brilliant closing fanfare is based on material which has been developed in all three movements.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £49.95

    Four Cities Symphony - Rodney Newton - -

    This piece was commissioned by the National Contesting Council as the 4th section test piece for the 2008 Regional Brass Band Championships of Great Britain. This symphony (the composer's 12th) has four movements played without a break. The first centres on two aspects of the city of London: its history and pageantry and its role as a busy modern metropolis.The second movement depicts Paris, its street cafes and boulevards and riverside walks, in the form of a romantic waltz. The third movement is constructed around the Gregorian chants of the Lord's Prayer (Pater noster, qui es in caelis) and the Creed (Credo in unum Deum) in an evocation of the city of Rome. After a powerful climax, mysterious tramping footsteps are heard as the ghosts or a Roman legion march through the city by night. The vision fades and the pater noster is heard once again, before the movement is brought to a close with the ancient Ambrosian chant, Christus Vincit, Christus Regnet, Christus Imperat.The final movement is an evocation of the city of Moscow, with its great historic buildings, its turbulent history and its fiery traditional music. At the outset a rather dour folk-like melody is heard which is transformed into a lively Cossack dance.This work is dedicated to Howard Wilson, former principal euphonium of City of Coventry Band who, in 1972, introduced the composer to top section brass band contesting.Rodney Newton, September 2007

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days