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  • £61.00

    Farvel til en slavisk kvinne - Vasiliec Agapkin - Reid Gilje

    Vasili Agapkin was trained as a trumpet player and a cavalryman. Farewell to a Slavoc Woman was composed in 1912 and is dedicated to all Slavic women.The march has had many different texts throughout the years, becoming very popular during the First World War.The composer is known for this march only. Today, the march has a kind of a National March status in his native Russia.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £25.00

    GREAT GATE OF KIEV, The (from Pictures at an Exhibition) (Brass Band) - Mussorgsky, Modest - Littlemore, Phillip

    Modest Mussorgsky was a close friend of the young artist and architect Victor Hartmann, and his death in 1873 plunged Mossorgsky into a deep depression. The following year a memorial exhibition in St. Petersburg displayed Hartmann's paintings, costumes, architectural designs and sketches. Mussorgsky's visit to it, combined with his desire to write a piece in his friend's memory, inspired him to compose hisPictures At An Exhibitionfor piano. A suite of ten movements, with a recurring Promenade theme, it is one of the composer's most famous works and regarded as a showpiece for virtuoso pianists. It is perhaps the orchestral transcription made by Maurice Ravel in 1922 that is now the most famous version of it. This arrangement opens with a brief excerpt fromThe Hut on Fowl's Legs, which was based on a painting of an elaborately carved clock depicting Baba Yaga, a horrible tiny witch that feasts on human bones. The tenth, and final picture in Mussorgsky's masterpiece is commonly referred to asThe Great Gate of Kiev, although it's literal translation is The Bogatyr Gates ??" a Bogatyr being a hero figure in medieval East Slavic legend. It features a grand main theme that is interspersed with a more solemn hymn-like secondary theme. The work closes with a grand final rendition of the Promenade theme that almost grinds to a halt at what must be the foot of what were to be magnificent ceremonial gates (although they were never actually built!). Duration: 6:00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £20.00

    SLAVONIC DANCE No.8 (Brass Band) - Dvorak, Antonin - Littlemore, Phillip

    Antonin Dvorak composed his first set of eight Slavonic Dances in 1878. The music is lively and overtly nationalistic, although the tunes themselves are all original and are not taken from any Slavic folk dances. Slavonic Dance No.8 is high-spirited and in the style of a furiant, the boldest of Czech folk dances. Although written in a 3/4 metre throughout, Dvorak creates cross-rhythms that shift this metre in to 2/4, which is an important characteristic of the furiant.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £25.00

    The Great Gate of Kiev - Phillip Littlemore

    Modest Mussorgsky was a close friend of the young artist and architect Victor Hartmann, and his death in 1873 plunged Mossorgsky into a deep depression. The following year a memorial exhibition in St. Petersburg displayed Hartmann’s paintings, costumes, architectural designs and sketches. Mussorgsky’s visit to it, combined with his desire to write a piece in his friend’s memory, inspired him to compose his Pictures At An Exhibition for piano. A suite of ten movements, with a recurring Promenade theme, it is one of the composer’s most famous works and regarded as a showpiece for virtuoso pianists. It is perhaps the orchestral transcription made by Maurice Ravel in 1922 that is now the most famous version of it. This arrangement opens with a brief excerpt from The Hut on Fowl’s Legs , which was based on a painting of an elaborately carved clock depicting Baba Yaga, a horrible tiny witch that feasts on human bones. The tenth, and final picture in Mussorgsky’s masterpiece is commonly referred to as The Great Gate of Kiev , although it’s literal translation is The Bogatyr Gates — a Bogatyr being a hero figure in medieval East Slavic legend. It features a grand main theme that is interspersed with a more solemn hymn-like secondary theme. The work closes with a grand final rendition of the Promenade theme that almost grinds to a halt at what must be the foot of what were to be magnificent ceremonial gates (although they were never actually built!). Item Code: TPBB-045 Duration: c. 6'00"

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £20.00

    Slavonic Dance No.8 - Antonin Dvorak - Phillip Littlemore

    Antonin Dvorak composed his first set of eight Slavonic Dances in 1878. Originally written for piano duet, the dances were inspired by Johannes Brahms’ Hungarian Dances , and were orchestrated soon after composition at his publisher’s request. The music is lively and overtly nationalistic, although the tunes themselves are all original and are not taken from any Slavic folk dances. It was indeed this first set of Slavonic Dances that finally launched Dvorak as a composer beyond his native Bohemia. Such were the popularity of the original dances, Dvorak wrote a second set of eight in 1886. Slavonic Dance No.8 is high-spirited and in the style of a furiant, the boldest of Czech folk dances. Although written in a 3/4 metre throughout, Dvorak creates cross-rhythms that shift this metre in to 2/4, which is an important characteristic of the furiant. Item Code: TPBB-036 Duration: 4'10"

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £25.00

    Song to the Moon (DvorAk arr: Dan Price) - Dan Price

    Brass Band Solo Series - Grade 3 Song To the Moon is the most popular aria from DvorAk's opera Rusalka which is based on the fairy tales written by Karel Jaromir Erben and BoAena NA?mcovA. A Rusalka in Slavic mythology is a water sprite or nymph.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days