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  • £30.00

    ZORBA THE GREEK (Folk dance)

    Estimated dispatch 3-5 days
  • £100.00

    Greek Dances - Norman Tailor

    Estimated dispatch 5-14 working days
  • £92.00

    Zorba The Greek - Mikis Theodorakis

    Estimated dispatch 5-14 working days
  • £29.50

    I Wont Say (I'm In Love) - Alan Menken - Richard Rock

    A great piece to give the horn players of your band something to get stuck into. Music from the animated Disney film "Hercules" is based upon the Greek mythology (albeit, slightly altered to be suitable for children!) telling the story of Hercules. This piece is sung by Meg as she realizes she is falling in love with him. The music for the film by composer Alan Menken was nominated for an Academy award, however sadly, was released at the same time at "Titanic" where James Horner's score won instead. Now arranged by Richard Rock as a grand feature for your bands horn section, pleasing to play and to listen too.

    In stock: Estimated dispatch 1-3 days

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  • £42.95

    Visions of Kolkhis (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

    Visions of Kolkhis was commissioned by Jason Katsikaris and the Leyland Band as a finale for their appearance at the 2009 Brass in Concert Championship Inspired by Jason Katsikaris's Greek lineage, the subject of the work could be considered a metaphor for his impact on the British brass band scene, and the Leyland Band's commitment to striving for excellence.Written in thee continuous sections, the work paints a vivid picture of the island of Kolkhis, a place instrumental in so many tales in Greek mythology. The music represents three individual stories; Jason and the Argonauts, the Golden Fleece, and the liberation of Prometheus by Hercules. However, musical material is drawn from the Leyland Band's signature march, Harold Moss's The Royal Tiger, named after the bus made by Leyland Vehicles in the 1950's.

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £164.99

    Music of the Spheres (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

    Music of the Spheres was commissioned by the Yorkshire Building Society Band and first performed by them at the European Brass Band Championships in Glasgow, May 2004. The piece reflects the composers fascination with the origins of the universe and deep space in general. The title comes from a theory, formulated by Pythagoras, that the cosmos was ruled by the same laws he had discovered that govern the ratios of note frequencies of the musical scale. ('Harmonia' in Ancient Greek, which means scale or tuning rather than harmony - Greek music was monophonic). He also believed that these ratios corresponded to the distances of the six known planets from the sun and thatthe planets each produced a musical note which combined to weave a continuous heavenly melody (which, unfortunately, we humans cannot hear). In this work, these six notes form the basis of the sections Music of the Spheres and Harmonia. The pieces opens with a horn solo called t = 0, a name given by some scientists to the moment of the Big Bang when time and space were created, and this is followed by a depiction of the Big Bang itself, as the entire universe bursts out from a single point. A slower section follows called The Lonely Planet which is a meditation on the incredible and unlikely set of circumstances which led to the creation of the Earth as a planet that can support life, and the constant search for other civilisations elsewhere in the universe. Asteroids and Shooting Stars depicts both the benign and dangerous objects that are flying through space and which constantly threaten our planet, and the piece ends with The Unknown, leaving in question whether our continually expanding exploration of the universe will eventually lead to enlightenment or destruction.Duration: 18:00

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £53.50

    Moussaka - Peter Martin

    Greek dishes are mouth-watering. The nation's traditional dish could not be omitted from the menu. And the Greek dishes are still affordable. The Sirtaki is the musical accompaniment during your culinary trip to Greece.

    Estimated dispatch 5-14 working days

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  • £168.50

    Music of the Spheres - Philip Sparke

    Music of the Spheres was commissioned by the Yorkshire Building Society Band and first performed by them at the European Brass Band Championships in Glasgow, May 2004.The piece reflects the composers fascination with the origins of the universe and deep space in general. The title comes from a theory, formulated by Pythagoras, that the cosmos was ruled by the same laws he had discovered that govern the ratios of note frequencies of the musical scale. ('Harmonia' in Ancient Greek, which means scale or tuning rather than harmony - Greek music was monophonic). He also believed that these ratios corresponded to the distances of the sixknown planets from the sun and thatthe planets each produced a musical note which combined to weave a continuous heavenly melody (which, unfortunately, we humans cannot hear). In this work, these six notes form the basis of the sections Music of the Spheres and Harmonia.The pieces opens with a horn solo called t = 0, a name given by some scientists to the moment of the Big Bangwhen time and space were created, and this is followed by a depiction of the Big Bangitself, as the entire universe bursts out from a single point. A slower section follows called The Lonely Planet which is a meditation on the incredible and unlikely set of circumstances which led to the creation of the Earth as a planet that can support life, and the constant search for other civilizations elsewhere in the universe. Asteroids and Shooting Stars depicts both the benign and dangerous objects that are flying through space and which constantly threaten our planet, and the piece ends with The Unknown, leaving in question whether our continually expanding exploration of the universe will eventually lead to enlightenment or destruction.

    Estimated dispatch 5-14 working days

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  • £64.99

    Olympus - Philip Harper

    Selected as the test-piece for the 3rd Section Regional contests of the National Brass Band Championships 2012The music begins with a depiction of the exciting Opening Ceremony where noisy fanfares and sudden swells add to the cosmopolitan flag-waving clamour. Without a break the music leads to The Chariot Race, a fast compound-time gallop withthundering hooves in the basses and percussion, and a heroic melody introduced by the tenor horns. Chariot racing was the main equestrian event in the Ancient Greek Games, which were founded in memory of King Oenomaus. In the Greek legend he suffereddefeat in a chariot race to his son-in-law and Zeus' grandson, Pelops, but much of the music is bitter-sweet to symbolise the fact that Pelops had to cheat to win drawing parallels with some of the issues still facing modern-day athletics. A slow, mystical passage follows, describing The Temple of Zeus at Olympia. The statue of Zeus, who was honoured throughout the Ancient Games' history, was housed inside the temple and was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Themusic depicts this period of the dawn of one of mankind's most ancient civilisations and there is a series of solo passages above a drone. The next section is called The Olympic Flame and a broad and lyrical anthem-like melody develops slowly in the euphoniums, which gradually ascends until the horns can take it over before passing upwards again to the cornets (Higher). The musicbursts into bright life at the lighting of the flame and the regular rhythmic pattern which has been established goes through an accelerando (Faster). The final section is called The Olympic Truce and aims to capture the cooperative spirit of the ancient practice of ending wars for the duration of the games. The anthem-like melody makes an affirmatory return (Stronger) and the work ends asit began with a blaze of colour and a real sense of optimism and global celebration. "Citius, Altius, Fortius" (Faster, Higher, Stonger)NOTES ON PERFORMANCEPercussion requirements: 1 to 3 players (3 Timpani, Snare Drum, Tenor Drum, Cymbals, Glockenspiel, Triangle)

    Estimated dispatch 5-14 working days
  • £29.99

    Olympus (Brass Band - Score only) - Harper, Philip

    Selected as the test-piece for the 3rd Section Regional contests of the National Brass Band Championships 2012The music begins with a depiction of the exciting Opening Ceremony where noisy fanfares and sudden swells add to the cosmopolitan flag-waving clamour. Without a break the music leads to The Chariot Race, a fast compound-time gallop with thundering hooves in the basses and percussion, and a heroic melody introduced by the tenor horns. Chariot racing was the main equestrian event in the Ancient Greek Games, which were founded in memory of King Oenomaus. In the Greek legend he suffered defeat in a chariot race to his son-in-law and Zeus' grandson, Pelops, but much of the music is bitter-sweet to symbolise the fact that Pelops had to cheat to win - drawing parallels with some of the issues still facing modern-day athletics.A slow, mystical passage follows, describing The Temple of Zeus at Olympia. The statue of Zeus, who was honoured throughout the Ancient Games' history, was housed inside the temple and was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. The music depicts this period of the dawn of one of mankind's most ancient civilisations and there is a series of solo passages above a drone.The next section is called The Olympic Flame and a broad and lyrical anthem-like melody develops slowly in the euphoniums, which gradually ascends until the horns can take it over before passing upwards again to the cornets (Higher). The music bursts into bright life at the lighting of the flame and the regular rhythmic pattern which has been established goes through an accelerando (Faster).The final section is called The Olympic Truce and aims to capture the cooperative spirit of the ancient practice of ending wars for the duration of the games. The anthem-like melody makes an affirmatory return (Stronger) and the work ends as it began - with a blaze of colour and a real sense of optimism and global celebration.Citius, Altius, Fortius (Faster, Higher, Stonger)Duration: 11:30

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days