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  • £135.00

    Music of the Spheres (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Sparke, Philip

    Music of the Spheres was commissioned by the Yorkshire Building Society Band and first performed by them at the European Brass Band Championships in Glasgow, May 2004. The piece reflects the composers fascination with the origins of the universe and deep space in general. The title comes from a theory, formulated by Pythagoras, that the cosmos was ruled by the same laws he had discovered that govern the ratios of note frequencies of the musical scale. ('Harmonia' in Ancient Greek, which means scale or tuning rather than harmony - Greek music was monophonic). He also believed that these ratios corresponded to the distances of the six known planets from the sun and thatthe planets each produced a musical note which combined to weave a continuous heavenly melody (which, unfortunately, we humans cannot hear). In this work, these six notes form the basis of the sections Music of the Spheres and Harmonia. The pieces opens with a horn solo called t = 0, a name given by some scientists to the moment of the Big Bang when time and space were created, and this is followed by a depiction of the Big Bang itself, as the entire universe bursts out from a single point. A slower section follows called The Lonely Planet which is a meditation on the incredible and unlikely set of circumstances which led to the creation of the Earth as a planet that can support life, and the constant search for other civilisations elsewhere in the universe. Asteroids and Shooting Stars depicts both the benign and dangerous objects that are flying through space and which constantly threaten our planet, and the piece ends with The Unknown, leaving in question whether our continually expanding exploration of the universe will eventually lead to enlightenment or destruction.Duration: 18:00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £135.00

    Music of the Spheres - Philip Sparke

    Music of the Spheres was commissioned by the Yorkshire Building Society Band and first performed by them at the European Brass Band Championships in Glasgow, May 2004. The piece reflects the composers fascination with the origins of the universe and deep space in general. The title comes from a theory, formulated by Pythagoras, that the cosmos was ruled by the same laws he had discovered that govern the ratios of note frequencies of the musical scale. ('Harmonia' in Ancient Greek, which means scale or tuning rather than harmony - Greek music was monophonic). He also believed that these ratios corresponded to the distances of the six known planets from the sun and thatthe planets each produced a musical note which combined to weave a continuous heavenly melody (which, unfortunately, we humans cannot hear). In this work, these six notes form the basis of the sections Music of the Spheres and Harmonia. The pieces opens with a horn solo called t = 0, a name given by some scientists to the moment of the Big Bang when time and space were created, and this is followed by a depiction of the Big Bang itself, as the entire universe bursts out from a single point. A slower section follows called The Lonely Planet which is a meditation on the incredible and unlikely set of circumstances which led to the creation of the Earth as a planet that can support life, and the constant search for other civilizations elsewhere in the universe. Asteroids and Shooting Stars depicts both the benign and dangerous objects that are flying through space and which constantly threaten our planet, and the piece ends with The Unknown, leaving in question whether our continually expanding exploration of the universe will eventually lead to enlightenment or destruction.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £125.00

    Music of the Spheres - Philip Sparke

    Music of the Spheres was commissioned by the Yorkshire Building Society Band and first performed by them at the European Brass Band Championships in Glasgow, May 2004. The piece reflects the composers fascination with the origins of the universe and deep space in general. The title comes from a theory, formulated by Pythagoras, that the cosmos was ruled by the same laws he had discovered that govern the ratios of note frequencies of the musical scale. ('Harmonia' in Ancient Greek, which means scale or tuning rather than harmony - Greek music was monophonic). He also believed that these ratios corresponded to the distances of the six known planets from the sun and thatthe planets each produced a musical note which combined to weave a continuous heavenly melody (which, unfortunately, we humans cannot hear). In this work, these six notes form the basis of the sections Music of the Spheres and Harmonia. The pieces opens with a horn solo called t = 0, a name given by some scientists to the moment of the Big Bang when time and space were created, and this is followed by a depiction of the Big Bang itself, as the entire universe bursts out from a single point. A slower section follows called The Lonely Planet which is a meditation on the incredible and unlikely set of circumstances which led to the creation of the Earth as a planet that can support life, and the constant search for other civilizations elsewhere in the universe. Asteroids and Shooting Stars depicts both the benign and dangerous objects that are flying through space and which constantly threaten our planet, and the piece ends with The Unknown, leaving in question whether our continually expanding exploration of the universe will eventually lead to enlightenment or destruction.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £45.00

    Finale to Act 1 of Tosca - Score & Parts - Giacomo Puccini

    The spectacular Te Deum from the Finale to Act I of Tosca, it begins quietly with the tolling bell as worshippers gather for Mass. The euphonium plays the part of the villainous Scarpia as the music gathers strength. Finally the doors of the church are thrown open and the glorious Te Deum fills the hallowed space.Featured on the CD Cory in Concert Volume V.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £23.00

    Finale to Act 1 of Tosca - Score Only - Giacomo Puccini

    The spectacular Te Deum from the Finale to Act I of Tosca, it begins quietly with the tolling bell as worshippers gather for Mass. The euphonium plays the part of the villainous Scarpia as the music gathers strength. Finally the doors of the church are thrown open and the glorious Te Deum fills the hallowed space.Featured on the CD Cory in Concert Volume V.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    Lake of Tenderness-Score and Parts

    Lake of Tenderness was commissioned by Dr. Robert Childs and the Grimethorpe Colliery Band as part of their 2015 Brass in Concert programme, in which a selection of new pieces were commissioned based on the various basaltic plains of the earth’s moon, thought by early astronomers to be lakes.Lake of Tenderness, named after the Latin ‘Lacus Lenitatis’, uses extended harmony to evoke imagery of the solitary moon in the still of space. The piece grows in texture and dynamic as if one were getting closer and closer to the Lake of Tenderness until the piece arrives at a thrilling climax. As the piece comes to an end the music dies away as if one were moving away from the moon, finishing with a final image of the full moon.Ben Hollings, January 2016

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £25.00 £25.00
    Buy from Wobbleco Music

    Wedding Processional (from The Sound Of Musid) - Richard Rodgers - Len Jenkins

    My wife Jayne, like many others, is an ardent fan of 'The Sound of Music' and the 'Wedding Processional' was an obvious choice to accompany her procession from the church door to the altar. However, in common with many weddings, ours was in a parish church where the distance was much less than shown in the 1965 movie and space for musicians limited. As a result, we set about producing an arrangement that works for a brass quintet with optional glockenspiel and church organ. It runs for 46 seconds (with optional cut) or 58 seconds. This does not sound very long, but it is surprising how quickly the bride gets to the altar. In common with our developing practice, the arrangement is scored for both Brass Band and Concert Brass instruments. A suggested set-up for the organ is also provided though this will be at the discretion of the organist who will know his instrument and setting more intimately. A slightly larger font has been used for the quintet parts to help where lighting levels may be lower than normal. Graham Cooper

  • £143.00

    Explorers on the Moon - Paul Raphael

    Composed by Paul Raphael, Explorers on the Moon, the sequel to his 2017 work Destination Moon, was composed in 2019 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the 1969 Moon Landings. It is inspired by the Belgian author Herge and his most famous creation, Tintin. The music uses Herge's story from 1950 - almost twenty years prior to the first ever moon landing - following Tintin and his fellow adventurers as they become the first humans on the Moon. This fantastic piece is split into three parts, titled 'Space', 'Nightmare Land' and 'The Journey Home' and is one of the most spectacular contest pieces in recent years.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £40.00

    The Irish Dancemaster - William Vean

    During the eighteenth century a person called 'the Dance Master' made his appearance in Ireland. He was a travelling dance-teacher, who moved from one village to another to teach the people there how to dance. They were often flamboyant personalities, gorgeously dressed and holding a staff in one hand. In order to teach their pupils the difference between their right and left leg, the dance master used to tie a small bunch of straw or hay to their leg and then would order them to either lift their 'hay-leg' or their 'straw-leg'. The dancing masters used to stay in one particular village for about six weeks (if they were not claimed by a neighbouring village), after which they continued their journey. Having a famous dance master gave a village a certain distinction and did not seldom lead to boasting and pride. Also on account of the popularity of Celtic music in general at the moment, William Vean was inspired to writing 'The Irish Dance Master'. He 'teaches' you two dances, the Reel and the Jig. In between these two dances there is a short breathing space, during which a traditional Irish rhythm can be enjoyed.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £64.95

    A Tear in the Fabric of Time - Gareth Wood - -

    A Tear in the Fabric of Time is essentially a symphony for brass band and was inspired by the book The Elegant Universe by Brian Greene, which attempts to simplify complex ideas in modern physics for the layperson. This piece was dedicated to and written for the Buy As You View Band but was first performed by the National Youth Brass Band of Great Britain, conducted by Robert Childs in Summer 2006. The work is featured by the Cory Band on their recording The Promised Land (DOYCD218).A brassy, fanfare like introduction provides much of the material for the rest of the work.This leads into a dramatic 'Allegro' driving forward with brittle motives and stabbing chords. A euphonium melody accompanied by divided basses attempts to mellow the mood, but is unsuccessful as the music drives ruthlessly on! The centre of the work is a choral like Adagio; maybe the blackness of space or the darkness of human nature. A short episode leads into a 'Presto' which is a reworking of the first 'Allegro' relentlessly careering to a violent end![Gareth Wood, 2006]

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days