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  • £21.50

    Sibelius Fantasy - Gavin Somerset

    Composed in 2003 for a composition competition, this work uses elements of three major work by the Finnish composer Jean Sibelius (1865-1957). The three being... Symphony No.5, Finlandia, Karelia Suite (March) The piece starts with an atmospheric opening before setting of in bar 10 with a tempo that will remain for most of the piece. The main original theme is brought in at A before the famous sequence from Sibelius' Symphony No.5 enters at B and then very distinctly at C. The music then rollercoasts through keeping all sections of the band busy, until we reach J when the solo Euphonium can shine, helped along by Flugel and Repiano. The Molto Vivo before K sets off with dazzling trills from the cornet section, and bringing with it the theme from Finlandia in bar 165, followed shortly by the March from the Karelia Suite. From N to the end, all three pieces are brought to a final climax together. A rousing piece and makes an interesting change to a direct transcription.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £34.95

    March to the Scaffold - Hector Berlioz - Robert Childs

    The Symphonie Fantastique, the first of Berlioz's major works, was composed in 1830 when he was 26. 'March to the Scaffold', the fourth movement in this major work is music borrowed from Les Francs Juges, an abandoned opera started in 1826, originally titled 'March of the Guards'. The ending of the original was changed to accommodate the appearance of the id?e fixe. This tune itself was used in an earlier work, the cantata Herminie of 1828. March to the Scaffold depicts a young man in despair, having been shunned by the woman he loves. He poisons himself with opium. The narcotic, too weak to take his life, plunges the man into a long sleep. He has a series of vivid dreams and nightmares always involving images of his beloved. The hero dreams that he has killed her and has been sentenced to death. He sees himself being marched through the crowded streets amidst wild jeers from excited onlookers until he finally reaches the scaffold.Just before the guillotine descends to cut off his head, he imagines he sees his beloved in the crowd. Her tune is played by the soprano cornet and is the last thing seen or heard before the guillotine falls. He is killed, and the movement comes to a dramatic close.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £75.00

    As Above, So Below - Jay Capperauld

    An original composition for brass band and brass quintet by Jay Capperauld was commissioned by John Wallace and The Wallace Collection with the support of the PRS Foundation’s Beyond Borders. This major work enjoyed its world premiere at The Cumnock Tryst on 30 September 2017 at Cumnock Old Church, performed by The Wallace Collection and Dalmellington Band, conducted by Martyn Brabbins.If you would like to perform this work, please don’t hesitate considering The Wallace Collection to provide the brass quintet elements – if you would like to discuss potential performances, please contact us on [email protected] NotesBased on the Hermetic maxim "As Above, So Below", the phrase comes from the cryptic text of The Emerald Tablet, which was purportedly written by a mysterious character who is thought of as an amalgamation of Greek and Egyptian Gods, Hermes Trismegistus. The text first appears in Arabic between the 6th and 8th Centuries and is intended to outline the primitive and hidden sources that constitute the basis of all matter in the universe. The phrase "As Above, So Below" implies an essential "oneness" of all matter and a correlation between the physical elements and supernatural entities that make up our surroundings. The philosophies expressed within The Emerald Tablet have become a founding principle of Alchemy, Occultism, Witchcraft, Theosophy and various other ancient gnostic systems of belief, and this work attempts to explore these forms of so-called "secret knowledge" in a ritualistic trance-like Adagio steeped in the esoteric.The Brass Band is placed at the centre of the stage while the solo Brass Quintet are spread antiphonally around the concert hall and are placed above both the Brass Band and the audience in an attempt to create a direct dialogue between the Above and the Below. Therefore, the piece endeavours to explore the meaning behind the text of The Emerald Tablet as well as the phrase 'As Above, So Below' in a music context while giving particular attention to the ‘SOLVE’ (Latin for 'Separate' which correlates to the Above) and ‘COAGLUA’ (Latin for 'Join Together' which relates to the Below) that is depicted in the image of the Baphomet by the French occultist author, Eliphas Levi, which is a visual representation of the phrase ‘As Above, So Below’.Additional Note of InterestIt was not until the work was complete that the role of the main melody became clear when an unexpected and inadvertent correlation between this melody and that of the Latin Dies Irae presented itself. The plainchant nature of As Above, So Below's melody became a defining feature of the piece and when compared to the melody of the Dies Irae (a similar melody reminiscent of that contained within As Above, So Below), some interesting and unsettling implications unveiled themselves.The findings of a comparison can be interpreted as follows:Both melodies adhere naturally to the plainchant idiom, which in itself strongly relates to a supernatural (or quasi-religious) element in both cases.Both melodies originate in the key of D; the Dies Irae resides in the Dorian Mode on D while the As Above, So Below melody inhabits the D Octatonic Scale.Both melodies can be divided into three distinct phrases, although the melody to As Above, So Below can be divided into three phrases in a number of ambiguous ways.The most striking and unnerving connection is that, by pure chance, the Latin text to the Dies Irae fits perfectly under both melodies giving an entirely specific context to how the melodies are perceived.By understanding the As Above, So Below melody as an alternative to that of the Dies Irae and by interpreting it in the same context, the connotations of the Dies Irae's otherworldliness, and the suggestion of a dialogue with the supernatural and death adds a richer dimension to the As Above, So Below melody which in turn solidifies the esoteric concept of this work.In conclusion, this unanticipated and purely accidental relationship between both melodies is worthy of note more so from an emotional and contextual perspective rather than from any analytical evaluation concerning the music itself - it is the circumstance of the so-called "secret knowledge" that has presented itself within the inner workings of As Above, So Below.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £25.00

    As Above, So Below ??" Score Only - Jay Capperauld

    (This listing is for the purchase of a Score ONLY. To order a complete set of score and parts please click here.)An original composition for brass band and brass quintet by Jay Capperauld was commissioned by John Wallace and The Wallace Collection with the support of the PRS Foundation’s Beyond Borders. This major work enjoyed its world premiere at The Cumnock Tryst on 30 September 2017 at Cumnock Old Church, performed by The Wallace Collection and Dalmellington Band, conducted by Martyn Brabbins.If you would like to perform this work, please don’t hesitate considering The Wallace Collection to provide the brass quintet elements – if you would like to discuss potential performances, please contact us on [email protected] NotesBased on the Hermetic maxim "As Above, So Below", the phrase comes from the cryptic text of The Emerald Tablet, which was purportedly written by a mysterious character who is thought of as an amalgamation of Greek and Egyptian Gods, Hermes Trismegistus. The text first appears in Arabic between the 6th and 8th Centuries and is intended to outline the primitive and hidden sources that constitute the basis of all matter in the universe. The phrase "As Above, So Below" implies an essential "oneness" of all matter and a correlation between the physical elements and supernatural entities that make up our surroundings. The philosophies expressed within The Emerald Tablet have become a founding principle of Alchemy, Occultism, Witchcraft, Theosophy and various other ancient gnostic systems of belief, and this work attempts to explore these forms of so-called "secret knowledge" in a ritualistic trance-like Adagio steeped in the esoteric.The Brass Band is placed at the centre of the stage while the solo Brass Quintet are spread antiphonally around the concert hall and are placed above both the Brass Band and the audience in an attempt to create a direct dialogue between the Above and the Below. Therefore, the piece endeavours to explore the meaning behind the text of The Emerald Tablet as well as the phrase 'As Above, So Below' in a music context while giving particular attention to the ‘SOLVE’ (Latin for 'Separate' which correlates to the Above) and ‘COAGLUA’ (Latin for 'Join Together' which relates to the Below) that is depicted in the image of the Baphomet by the French occultist author, Eliphas Levi, which is a visual representation of the phrase ‘As Above, So Below’.Additional Note of InterestIt was not until the work was complete that the role of the main melody became clear when an unexpected and inadvertent correlation between this melody and that of the Latin Dies Irae presented itself. The plainchant nature of As Above, So Below's melody became a defining feature of the piece and when compared to the melody of the Dies Irae (a similar melody reminiscent of that contained within As Above, So Below), some interesting and unsettling implications unveiled themselves.The findings of a comparison can be interpreted as follows:Both melodies adhere naturally to the plainchant idiom, which in itself strongly relates to a supernatural (or quasi-religious) element in both cases.Both melodies originate in the key of D; the Dies Irae resides in the Dorian Mode on D while the As Above, So Below melody inhabits the D Octatonic Scale.Both melodies can be divided into three distinct phrases, although the melody to As Above, So Below can be divided into three phrases in a number of ambiguous ways.The most striking and unnerving connection is that, by pure chance, the Latin text to the Dies Irae fits perfectly under both melodies giving an entirely specific context to how the melodies are perceived.By understanding the As Above, So Below melody as an alternative to that of the Dies Irae and by interpreting it in the same context, the connotations of the Dies Irae's otherworldliness, and the suggestion of a dialogue with the supernatural and death adds a richer dimension to the As Above, So Below melody which in turn solidifies the esoteric concept of this work.In conclusion, this unanticipated and purely accidental relationship between both melodies is worthy of note more so from an emotional and contextual perspective rather than from any analytical evaluation concerning the music itself - it is the circumstance of the so-called "secret knowledge" that has presented itself within the inner workings of As Above, So Below.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £40.00

    Alchemists' Fire - Lucy Pankhurst

    An original composition from Lucy Pankhurst and Winner of the 2011 John Golland Award, receiving its premiere at the RNCM Festival of Brass that same year.It is a complex, energetic and invigorating major work for brass band, and one which rightly demands attention through its intricate scoring, impact-making effects and bubbling brilliance!Comments from the composer on the work’s title and its multi-purpose influence and inspiration upon her composition:“The phrase “Alchemists’ Fire” has several possible connotations:Firstly, Alchemists' Fire is a magical weapon featured in the Dungeons & Dragon role playing game. It is a potion, so can be used to splash, throw or pour onto a target, dealing fire damage if it hits successfully.The second possible meaning comes from an historical source, where it was also known as Greek Fire, from which the D&D element takes its influence. This was an incendiary weapon used by the Byzantine Empire, typically used in naval battles to great effect, as it could continue to burn on water. It provided a technological advantage and was responsible for many key Byzantine victories. The manufacture of this 'fire' was kept a deadly secret; so much so that the formula was eventually lost and contemporary scientists and historians can only speculate at what the chemical make-up might have been.The final implication is a much more visual and sensory concept; that of the fire actually used by the Alchemist in his work - raging, dangerous and white-hot. Some sections of the work reflect the idea of 'magic' and ongoing experiments, some successful, some failing dangerously, in a cacophony of pops, fizzes and explosions amidst furious heat and brief moments of calm as the fire slowly cools, sizzling with residual components and elemental energy.”

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £35.00

    Ascension - Lucy Pankhurst

    A major work written for the RNCM Brass Festival Competition 2005, and inspired by the nature of Ascension – creating a Musical depiction of the spiritual journey towards enlightenment, sanctuary and ultimate inner peace.As aninitial muse for this work, the ‘Tibetan Singing Bowl’ is utilised with the Brass Band in order to represent this path to Serenity, together withBaoding Balls(Chinese Health Balls) to mark the point of Final Ascension.Programme notes from the composer, Lucy Pankhurst:Ascension is a Musical depiction of the Spiritual Journey towards enlightenment, sanctuary and ultimate inner peace.As my initial muse for this work, the Singing Bowl is utilised with the Brass Band in order to represent this path to Serenity. “Tibetan” Singing Bowls date back to the 8th Century A.D., originating in the pre-Buddhist shamanic Bon Po culture in the Himalayas and are still used in modern Monasteries. The original purpose of them still remains a mystery, with accounts stating that it is forbidden to disclose the true function of the Bowls, as the “secrets of sound” yield so much Power, that they must be kept hidden.Listening to the tones created by the Singing Bowl effectively silences the internal dialogue of the listener, making it an excellent tool for Meditation, Centering and entering trance-like states. In Buddhism, as with many cultures, sound is an important part of Spiritual Practice. There are 9 methods to reach Enlightenment in the Buddhist Doctrine ; the seventh is SOUND.These Bowls are used by Healers in a similar way to help balance the body’s residual energies. The Bowls are usually made from seven different sacred metals, intended to correlate directly to the seven sacred “Planets” : GOLD (Sun), SILVER (Moon), MERCURY (Mercury), COPPER (Venus), IRON (Mars), TIN (Jupiter), ANTIMONY (Saturn). Any one Bowl can create up to seven different frequencies (tones) simultaneously. In Healing, the Singing Bowl is played whilst balanced on the palm of the hand, struck three times to stabilise the surrounding energies, before rotating the wooden “beater” around the outer circumference of the Bowl to create the “singing” effect.I have included an optional Vibraphone part (to be played with a Double Bass Bow) with Tubular Bells, to be used only in performances where a Singing Bowl cannot be acquired. However, a traditional Bowl should be used whenever possible, to create this specific and unique sound.Baoding Balls or Chinese Health Balls are also utilised in this work. Their appearance in the Music here, however, is to mark the point of Final Ascension, where the music reaches its ultimate goal. These delicate cloisonne iron Balls are said to stimulate the acupressure points on the hand, thus improving the Chi and Energy Paths (Life Force) throughout the entire body. The delicate “tinkle” produced by these spheres is hypnotic and captivating. For this reason, where no Baoding Balls are obtainable for performance, only delicate metallic percussion should be used in replacement (i.e. Crotales, Antique Cymbals or (liberal) single strikes on a Triangle etc.). Bell Trees, Wind Chimes and Cow Bells should not be used.As in many cultures, the number three is important in Ascension, as it represents not only the purification from the Singing Bowl, but also it is a number of confirmation, reiterated throughout the music in the metallic percussion in addition to the Brass, re-affirming the correct path to Enlightenment.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £19.99

    Brass Dynamics - Franco Cesarini

    Composed for the 2nd section of the Swiss Brass Band Championships Brass Dynamics is perfect as a major work for any concert. It is centred on the form of an (A-B-A) overture with the initial dynamic theme setting the tone for the entire work and reoccurring in each movement. Composer Franco Cesarini has a masterful feel for brass band orchestration and brings out the best of all instruments and instrument combinations. Enrich your concert repertoire with this fascinating work.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £75.00

    Cantata - Andrew Duncan

    A major work composed for brass band by Andrew Duncan. The piece was commissioned by (and dedicated to) The Foden’s Band, and selected as the set work at the 2014 Scottish Open Brass Band Championships, offering an exciting addition to the contesting repertoire.A challenging piece for the players, but one which reaps huge rewards through its rich scoring and imaginative development. A work of three movements, Cantata presents a new dynamic level of its composer’s musical mastery.Listen In – Movement 1 (digital sound sample):https://www.themusiccompanyshop.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Cantata-1st-Movement.mp3Listen In – Movement 2 (digital sound sample):https://www.themusiccompanyshop.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Cantata-2nd-Movement.mp3Listen In – Movement 3 (digital sound sample):https://www.themusiccompanyshop.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Cantata-3rd-Movement.mp3

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £20.00

    Cantata ??" Score Only - Andrew Duncan

    A major work composed for brass band by Andrew Duncan. The piece was commissioned by (and dedicated to) The Foden’s Band, and selected as the set work at the 2014 Scottish Open Brass Band Championships, offering an exciting addition to the contesting repertoire.A challenging piece for the players, but one which reaps huge rewards through its rich scoring and imaginative development. A work of three movements, Cantata presents a new dynamic level of its composer’s musical mastery.Listen In – Movement 1 (digital sound sample):https://www.themusiccompanyshop.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Cantata-1st-Movement.mp3Listen In – Movement 2 (digital sound sample):https://www.themusiccompanyshop.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Cantata-2nd-Movement.mp3Listen In – Movement 3 (digital sound sample):https://www.themusiccompanyshop.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Cantata-3rd-Movement.mp3

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £138.99

    From Ancient Times (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Van der Roost, Jan

    From Ancient Times is a major work for brass band, inspired largely by the music of the Franco-Flemish School of the Renaissance. Hints of Gregorian chant and middle age dances pay tribute to music from even earlier times. The foundation of this spectacular work rests on truly 'ancient times' while the tonal language is of a much more modern nature!Duration: 16:30

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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