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  • £116.00

    HOLD ON - Traditional - Collins Dave

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days

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  • £21.50

    The Land Before Time - James Horner - Gavin Somerset

    The music of James Horner is known around the world for his strong, heart-warming melody lines that featured in such films at 'Titanic' and 'An American Tail'. Released in 1988, 'The Land Before Time' was made by the same film creators of 'An American Tail' and so, James Horner and Will Jennings were the obvious choice to create the movie's soundtrack, following the success of 'Somewhere Out There' (from 'An American Tail'). They didn't disappoint, and the main title track 'If We Hold On Together' became a success both on the screen and off when it was released as a single by Diana Ross in 1989. Now arranged by Gavin Somerset, this release will take a generation back in time to the story of Littlefoot, who embarks upon journey with 4 friends as they search for the Great Valley. A great item for all bands

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £29.95

    Flourish/Dances - Kevin Norbury

    Written originally for Intrada Brass by Kevin Norbury, this music is in four short movements: Flourish, Pavanne, Basse-Dance and Hornpipe, which provides a scintillating finale. Hold on to your hats!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £29.95

    Salvation Army Classics Series Numbers 17-20 - Charles Skinner, Albert Jakeway, Eric Ball

    17. March - Amsterdam Congress (Charles Skinner)This march was written for the Dutch Annual Bandsman's Congress, and is based on the theme well known on the continent as well as in this country, God is love. Published in 1951, it is melodic throughout and easy to play. 18. Meditation - Thine Alone (Charles Skinner)The expressive tune Misericordia is used for this meditation first published in 1959. It represents the sentiments of four verses of Frances Ridley Havergal's classic hymn, as follows, Just as I am, without one plea; Just as I am, and waiting not; Just as I am, though tossed about, and the final verse of surrender: Just as I am, thy love unknownHas broken every barrier down, Now to be thine, yea, thine alone,O Lamb of God, I come! 19. Love Divine - Ave Verum (arr. Albert Jakeway)A band arrangement of Mozart's beautiful Ave Verum set to the well-known verses, Love divine, all loves excelling. This setting was originally published in 1945. 20. Meditation - Hold thou my hand (Eric Ball)This piece, published in 1941, is suitable for use in devotional meetings, quite easy to play - although giving scope for very expressive treatment. The song which is the basis of the meditation is one of trust in our Lord's presence in all circumstances. The words of the first verse are:Hold thou my hand! so weak am I and helpless,I dare not take one step without thy aid;Hold thou my hand! for then, O loving Saviour,No dread of ill shall make my soul afraid.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £44.60

    Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree - Stept - Bjorn Morten Kjaernes

    "Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree (With Anyone Else but Me)" is a popular song that was made famous by Glenn Miller and by the Andrews Sisters during World War II. Its lyrics are the words of two young lovers who pledge their fidelity while one of them is away serving in the war.Originally titled "Anywhere the Bluebird Goes", the melody was written by Sam H. Stept as an updated version of the nineteenth-century English folk song "Long, Long Ago". Lew Brown and Charles Tobias wrote the lyrics and the song debuted in the 1939 Broadway musical Yokel Boy. After the United States entered the war in December 1941, Brown and Tobias modified the lyrics to their current form, with the chorus ending with "...'till I come marching home".In 1942 the song was featured in the film Private Buckaroo as a performance by the Andrews Sisters with the Harry James orchestra and featuring a tap dancing routine by The Jivin' Jacks and Jills. It was featured in the films Twelve O'Clock High (1949), With a Song in My Heart (1952), Kiss Them for Me (1957), A Carol for Another Christmas (1964), In Dreams (1999) and The Master (2012). It also featured in the mini-series The Pacific. You can use the song both on musical concerts, movie concerts or just as a happy jazz tune on your next concert.On the sections (like from bar 25), please work carefully to make a good balance with all parts, and that each chord is balanced. With 4-part harmonies sometimes you need to hold back certain notes to make the accord sound good.If you want to open up for a longer improvisation, you can repeat 65 to 81, but then change the part 2 in bar 80 from Eb to a D on the repeat. The accord will be an F6 instead of F7 (on beat 3 and 4 in bar 80) Have fun and enjoy!

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days

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  • £44.00

    Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree - Stept-Brown-Tobias - Bjorn Morten Kjaernes

    "Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree (With Anyone Else but Me)" is a popular song that was made famous by Glenn Miller and by the Andrews Sisters during World War II. Its lyrics are the words of two young lovers who pledge their fidelity while one of them is away serving in the war. Originally titled "Anywhere the Bluebird Goes", the melody was written by Sam H. Stept as an updated version of the nineteenth-century English folk song "Long, Long Ago". Lew Brown and Charles Tobias wrote the lyrics and the song debuted in the 1939 Broadway musical Yokel Boy. After the United States entered the war in December 1941, Brown and Tobias modified the lyrics to their current form, with the chorus ending with "...'till I come marching home".In 1942 the song was featured in the film Private Buckaroo as a performance by the Andrews Sisters with the Harry James orchestra and featuring a tap dancing routine by The Jivin' Jacks and Jills. It was featured in the films Twelve O'Clock High (1949), With a Song in My Heart (1952), Kiss Them for Me (1957), A Carol for Another Christmas (1964), In Dreams (1999) and The Master (2012). It also featured in the mini-series The Pacific. You can use the song both on musical concerts, movie concerts or just as a happy jazz tune on your next concert. On the sections (like from bar 25), please work carefully to make a good balance with all parts, and that each chord is balanced. With 4-part harmonies sometimes you need to hold back certain notes to make the accord sound good. If you want to open up for a longer improvisation, you can repeat 65 to 81, but then change the part 2 in bar 80 from Eb to a D on the repeat. The accord will be an F6 instead of F7 (on beat 3 and 4 in bar 80) Have fun and enjoy!

  • £34.50

    Old Chalet, The (Traditional Switzerland) - H. Snell

    Alpine sonorities and melodies are mixed together here from such diverse sources as the alpenhorn, via Brahms, but basically from a lovely traditional melody "High up on the mountain, there was an old chalet". In fact the melody is current well outside Switzerland and can be found equally in the Auvergne in central France. The offstage alpenhorn parts can as easily be played on a euphonium, without vibrato of course. This piece has never failed to hold the audience' attention for the full 6 or 7 minutes (depending on the performance). It is realtively easy to play and simply needs a little organisation of the groups of players.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £54.40

    Ei hand a holde i - Trygve Hoff - Haakon Esplo

    Norwegian artist Jorn Hoel made his breakthrough with his album Varme ut av is released in 1987.The songs "Have a Dream" and "Hold My Hand" became big hits and still stand out as some of the most played songs even today. The music was written by Svein Gundersen and lyrics by Trygve Hoff on both of them.Jorn Hoel was awarded "Singer/songwriter of the year" for this release.

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days
  • £79.95

    Waiting for a Pain Hit!??!!? - Paul McGhee

    Waiting For a Pain Hit!??!!? was written during November and December 2006 as an entry in the 2006/07 Swiss Brass Band Association Composers Competition. It was later chosen as the Championship Section set test piece for the 2010 Swiss National Brass Band Championships.The piece originates from sketches for a Brass Quintet which was written whilst I was in my second year of studies at the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama. The piece, now being much more elaborate both musically and structurally than the original, aims to explore the many various textures available to a large brass ensemble. The aims of the piece, from its earliest stages, were mainly exploration of textures as well as dealing with issues of continuity and whilst the piece certainly contains challenging technical elements, they were not a driving force behind its inception and more organically grew from the primary aims of the piece. I was purposefully looking throughout the writing and editing process to create a piece of music with a seamless, ethereal quality to both the structure and the musical content.There are no 'performance directions' throughout the piece, the reasoning for this is explained below. However, I have spent much time and thought over the tempo markings throughout the piece and the tempos throughout the piece are the desired tempi and care should be taken with these. The tempo markings contained throughout the piece form a vital part of the structure and affect the continuity of the piece. Metronome marks contained within a box show the tempo of the new section in relation to the tempo that precedes it by use of metronome modulations. Any alterations tothe tempo of the section that precedes it will alter the boxed metronome marks.The title of a piece of music, please forgive my generalisation, is to give an insight into 'what a piece is about'. I suppose that this piece is no different, but with the title being slightly abstract I shall resist the temptation to reveal what it means to me. The title, I feel, needs to be open to interpretation along with the music within. That's the way, with this piece especially, I like my music to be. Freedom to find our own meaning and a way to express it from within the score is vital. It is only then that the piece can take on its own identity and grow in ways that even I might not have imagined, revealing different sides to its personality with each performance.Before the music begins I have included some text. Do these words hold the key to the music?! Can they help??!I DON'T KNOW!!!I just like the rhythms, the pulse and the imagery. Hopefully all of this can help to create a picture. But let it be your picture...Paul McGhee, June 2010.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days