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  • £45.00

    Finale to Act I of Tosca - Puccini, G - Harper, P

    The spectacular Te Deum from the Finale to Act I of Tosca, it begins quietly with the tolling bell as worshippers gather for Mass. The euphonium plays the part of the villainous Scarpia as the music gathers strength. Finally the doors of the church are thrown open and the glorious Te Deum fills the hallowed space.Featured on the CD Cory in Concert Volume V.1st SectionDuration 5 minsListen to Cory BandCourtesy of World of Brass

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days

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  • £45.00

    TOSCA (Finale to Act 1) (Brass Band) - Puccini, Giacomo - Harper, Philip

    The spectacular Te Deum from the Finale to Act I of Tosca, it begins quietly with the tolling bell as worshippers gather for Mass. The euphonium plays the part of the villainous Scarpia as the music gathers strength. Finally the doors of the church are thrown open and the glorious Te Deum fills the hallowed space. Feature on the CD Cory in Concert Volume V. Grade: 1st Section. Duration: 5:00

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days

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  • £45.00

    Finale to Act 1 of Tosca (Score and Parts) - Puccini, GiacomoArranger:

    The spectacular Te Deum from the Finale to Act I of Tosca, it begins quietly with the tolling bell as worshippers gather for Mass. The euphonium plays the part of the villainous Scarpia as the music gathers strength. Finally the doors of the church are thrown open and the glorious Te Deum fills the hallowed space.Featured on the CD Cory in Concert Volume V.

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days
  • £10.00

    Endurance

    DescriptionMen wanted for hazardous journey.Small wages, bitter cold,long months of complete darkness,constant danger, safe return doubtful.Honour and recognition in case of success.– Ernest Shackleton, 4 Burlington StreetEndurance takes its title from the ship used by Sir Ernest Shackleton's Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition in 1914-15. After many months of fundraising (and reputedly running the above advert in The Times) the Endurance set sail from Plymouth on 6 August 1914. Whilst at sea news of the outbreak of war led Shackleton to put his ship and crew at the disposal of the Admiralty, but their services were not required and they were encouraged to continue. On October 26 1914 they left Grytviken on South Georgia for the Antarctic continent, hoping to find the pack ice shrinking in the Antarctic spring. Two days later, however, they encountered unseasonable ice which slowed their progress considerably. On 15 January 1915, when Endurance was only 200 miles from her intended landfall at Vahsel Bay, the ship became beset by ice which had been compressed against the land to the south by gale force winds. Trapped in the ice of the Weddell Sea, the ship spent the Antarctic winter driven by the weather further from her intended destination until, on 21 November 1915 Endurance broke up forcing the crew to abandon ship and set up camp on the ice at a site they named "Patience Camp".The crew spent several weeks on the ice. As the southern spring started to reduce the extent of the ice shelf they took to their three lifeboats, sailing across the open ocean to reach the desolate and uninhabited Elephant Island. There they used two of the boats to build a makeshift shelter while Shackleton and five others took the largest boat, an open lifeboat named the 'James Caird' and sailed it for 800 terrifyingly dangerous miles across the vast and lonely Southern Atlantic to South Georgia – a journey now widely regarded as one of the greatest and most heroic small-boat journeys ever undertaken. After landing on the wrong side of the island and having to climb over a mountain range in the dark with no map, Shackleton and his companions finally stumbled back into the Grytviken whaling station on 19 May 1916.After resting very briefly to recover his strength, Shackleton then began a relentless campaign to beg or borrow a ship to rescue the rest of his crew from Elephant Island; whaling ships were not strong enough to enter polar ice, but on 30 August 1916, over two years after their departure from Plymouth, Shackleton finally returned to Elephant Island aboard a steam tug borrowed from the Chilean government. Although some were in poor health, every member of the Endurance crew was rescued and returned home alive.Endurance is dedicated to the memory of my mum, who passed away in September 2017.Listen to a computer generated preview and follow the score below:?

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £24.95

    Lloyd (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Howard, Cuthbert - Coles, Bramwell

    The first presentation of the theme can be used for the purpose of accompanying congregational singing. At Section A the second presentation of the tune appears in the key of the dominant, the melody being given throughout to Solo Horn, with First Horn, First Trombone, Soprano and Flugel reinforcing the melody in the various phrases. Incidentally, see that the players do not break these phrases; it should be possible to take the four bars in one breath quite easily. Take due care of the light and shade which should be delicately applied. In the last bar the music gathers strength as we pass back into the original key for the last verse; pay particular attention to the part allotted to Second Baritone and Euphonium which needs to be slightly stressed. For the last appearance of the tune at Section B the full Band is used, apart from the third phrase which is given solo by Solo Comet with a light accompaniment above a bass pedal. Notice the rit. operating from the end of the eleventh bar and also the short swell effect on the fourth beat of the fourteenth bar.

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days
  • £12.50

    Lloyd (Brass Band - Score only) - Howard, Cuthbert - Coles, Bramwell

    The first presentation of the theme can be used for the purpose of accompanying congregational singing. At Section A the second presentation of the tune appears in the key of the dominant, the melody being given throughout to Solo Horn, with First Horn, First Trombone, Soprano and Flugel reinforcing the melody in the various phrases. Incidentally, see that the players do not break these phrases; it should be possible to take the four bars in one breath quite easily. Take due care of the light and shade which should be delicately applied. In the last bar the music gathers strength as we pass back into the original key for the last verse; pay particular attention to the part allotted to Second Baritone and Euphonium which needs to be slightly stressed. For the last appearance of the tune at Section B the full Band is used, apart from the third phrase which is given solo by Solo Comet with a light accompaniment above a bass pedal. Notice the rit. operating from the end of the eleventh bar and also the short swell effect on the fourth beat of the fourteenth bar.

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days
  • £69.95

    Corineus - Christopher Bond

    Corineus, in medieval British legend, was a prodigious warrior, a fighter of giants, and the eponymous founder of Cornwall. The first of the legendary rulers of Cornwall, he is described as a character of strength and power. It is on the medieval ruler that this new work, Corineus, is based, presented in three contrasting sections. The work opens with heraldic fanfares and a sense of jubilance before presenting musical material which changes and develops organically, portraying the journey taken by Corineus, Brutus, and the Trojans from modern-day mainland Europe to Britain. The central section of the work is slower, creating a feeling of longing. Brutus' son, Locrinus, had agreed to marry Corineus' daughter, Gwendolen, but instead fell in love with a German princess. In writing this part of the work, the composer portrays the longing of Gwendolen for her husband, knowing he is in love with somebody else. After Corineus died, Locrinus divorced Gwendolen, who responded by raising an army in Cornwall and making war against her ex-husband. Locrinus was killed in battle, and legend suggests that Gwendolen threw Locrinus' lover into the River Severn. This dramatic battle provides the inspiration for the final part of the work. In writing this work, the composer hopes to flare the imagination of young brass players around the country, in an engaging new take on a firm fixture in British folklore.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £35.00

    Oubliette - Lucy Pankhurst

    Lucy Pankhurst has created a highly immersive solo for Tuba/Eb Bass with brass band accompaniment, aiming and succeeding in showing the lyrical and technical diversity of the tuba, demanding virtuoso brilliance and clarity in performance.Dedicated to tuba player Edd Leech, Oubliette raises the bar for tuba repertoire.Set includes score, brass band parts and solo parts for Eb Bass (TC) and Tuba (BC). Solo with piano accompaniment available separately.Programme notes from the composer, Lucy Pankhurst:From the French word oublier, meaning ‘to forget’, an oubliette was a form of dungeon used in the 14th century. A small, windowless room where someone is locked away to be forgotten and left to go mad.I initially chose this title for the piece as the Tuba is often forgotten as a solo instrument, when its versatility in performance should be celebrated. Oubliette showsThe work begins with desolate and sparse accompaniment with lamenting solo lines. The soloist has already been cast into the oubliette at this point and is beginning to wake from a somnolent state. Reality is blurred through the darkness of the chamber – the only entrance is a hatch in the ceiling, far out of reach.Memories are confused by countless hours of solitude – hallucinations and paranoia tainting reality. Gradually, the soloist remembers images from the past and gains confidence and strength. Long forgotten by the captors, or presumed dead in the chamber, the entrance hatch suddenly opens to allow another prisoner inside. The soloist seizes the opportunity for escape and a short battle ensues. Sword and fist fighting, perilous leaps over the entrances to more dungeons and fierce battle cries are futile, as the soloist suddenly realises they are alone in the oubliette once more and the skirmish was nothing but another dream.The piece concludes with unaccompanied soloist in the low register, sinking deeper into the shadows of the windowless prison; are they accepting their fate, or merely lying in wait for another chance of escape, if one will ever come . . .

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days
  • £44.95

    The Storm Cone - Lucy Pankhurst

    The Storm Cone was commissioned from Lucy Pankhurst as a central part of an immersive artwork by Laura Daly, which considers our intrinsic relationship with the past.The project itself takes the form of a downloadable app, featuring geolocated augmented reality technology and binaural recordings. The music was performed and recorded remotely by the students, staff and friends of the University of Salford during the UK lockdowns in 2021.At its centre, is a journey through music and sound that charts the fading away of a brass band during the interwar years (1918 - 1939). Using new technologies to trace lost bandstands in their final days of mass popularity, we first encounter the band performing as a full ensemble, in 360?audio. Breath-taking detail can be heard from every instrument as you move amongst the absent musicians; proximity altering the perception of sounds as Pankhurst's score builds and then returns to a single note. From the powerful, collective sound of the band, the journey then follows the departed musicians into eight spatial sound works by Daly, where their fragile solo phrases merge and mutate in new environments. History, fiction, artifice and reality combine within this sensory encounter to confront the present with its past.This absorbing work takes its name from the title of Rudyard Kipling's 1932 poem that forewarned of WWII. It considers key aspects of the interwar period and the ensuing break-up and reshaping of communities in different parts of the country. Brass bands, with their strong industrial, religious and militaristic associations, lost many musicians to both World Wars, and the intervening years of shellshock, unemployment, economic migrancy, and industrial action. Their survival and the survival of brass music tells a story of working-class life during this epoch of deindustrialisation. Life, music and creative legacy all being sustained by breath. As the band's sound lingers in an absent-minded hum or whistle, it becomes both an imprint and portal to these past times.The Storm Cone commemorates the legacy of creativity, music and sound, the power of community and the importance of collective memory, history and storytelling. It highlights the emotive nature of the past and how it can also help foresee possible futures. Serving as warning shot, The Storm Cone contemplates the residual impact of the interwar period and the cyclical nature of history in terms of current events, including the economic downturn and the rise of populism, extremism, racism and antisemitism; problems seemingly exacerbated by the current pandemic. The resulting experience is an artwork that underlines human strength and fragility and is imbued with a sense of both loss and celebration.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £70.00

    General Series Band Journal December 2015 Numbers 2150-2153

    No. 2150 March – Full Bloom (Martyn Thomas)This march was written as a tribute to the loyal service provided by Salvation Army bands across the world and was premi?red by Enfield Citadel Band in 2012. Using the tune Jesus, Jesus, lily of the valley (T.B.C.S. 43), the march is traditional in format and style but nevertheless has plenty of original touches, both rhythmically and melodically.No. 2151 Festival March - God's Army (Niels Silfverberg)This march tries to reflect on the unchanging principles of a living Salvation Army in a changing world, but with unchanging needs. The Salvation Army, being an international part of the universal Christian Church, with a ministry motivated by the love of God and a mission to preach the gospel of Jesus Christ; one army - one mission - one message. The march uses themes from a number of songs from different eras, reflecting the continued fight in 'God's Army'.No. 2152 Still hold me closer (Michael Davis)The gospel song Sweet will of God by Leila N. Morris is here given a beautiful setting by Michael Davis.No. 2153 Everlasting Hope (Paul Sharman)'Strength for today and bright hope for tomorrow', a line from the song 'Great is thy faithfulness', is taken and developed into an original melody. The music attempts to portray the fact that God's faithfulness to each one of us gives us all 'hope for tomorrow'.

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days