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  • £25.00

    POMP AND CIRCUMSTANCE MARCH No.2 (Brass Band) - Littlemore, Phillip

    Following the spectacular success of his Pomp & Circumstance March No. 1, which received over 100 performances in its first year, it was almost inevitable that Elgar would write a second. However, what is not commonly known is that the initial sketches for what was to become thePomp & Circumstance March No. 2were written first! Due to the successes of the first march, not least because it now features at every Prom concert, it is forgotten that not only did Elgar submit the manuscript for both marches to his publisher at the same time, but both marches were premiered at the same concert and both performed a few days later at the same Promenade Concert. Duration: 5:00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £44.00

    Minerva - Jan Van der Roost

    Minerva by Jan Van der Roost was composed on the commission of the German "Musikverein Braunshausen" on the occasion of the 75th anniversary of the orchestra. The composition, first performed on September 17, 1999, is not a street march but a concert march, just like Mercury and Arsenal. The use and variation of different rhythmic patterns gives the first part of this march a distinctly dynamic character. Two main themes are presented in several instrumental combinations. The theme from the trio, on the other hand, is characterized by a broad melodic approach using large intervals. This theme, wreathed by high woodwinds, is heard one more time after a contrasting new part, but now in a somewhat slower tempo. The counterpoint in this part refers to the first part of the march. The brilliant ending suits a festive anniversary march!

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £10.00

    The Once and Future King

    DescriptionThe Once and Future King is a suite of three movements; each movement was inspired by an Arthurian legend. The first movement, 'Tintagel', concerns the famous Cornish promontory said to be the birthplace of King Arthur. In Arthur's time, Tintagel was part of the court of King Mark of Cornwall and the music imagines a visit by the King of the Britons to his Cornish neighbour and the place of his birth, reflecting the ceremony and drama of such an occasion; the music is strongly antiphonal, contrasting the more strident fanfares of the cornets and trombones with the warmth of the saxhorns and tubas.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Once-Future-King-Tintagel.mp3The second movement, 'Lyonesse', takes its inspiration from the mythical land which once joined Cornwall to the Isles of Scilly. One legend claims that after the disastrous battle of Camlan where Arthur and Mordred were both killed, the remnants of Arthur's army were pursued across Lyonesse to Scilly, whereupon Merlin cast a spell to sink Lyonesse behind them and drown the pursuers. Some say the bells of the 140 churches inundated that day can still be heard ringing. All the material in this movement derives from two short motifs heard in counterpoint at the very beginning, which are intentionally dissonant and bitonal in character.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Once-Future-King-Lyonesse.mp3The final movement, 'Badon Hill', takes its title from the legendary site of Arthur's last battle with the Saxons and is a lively toccata based on the medieval secular song L'Homme Armee ('The Armed Man'). The music uses a number of medieval devices including "hocketing" (passing melody from one voice to another). The actual site of Badon Hill is unknown but it has been associated with Badbury Rings in Dorset and a lot of evidence now points towards the town of Bath. Arthur's victory at Badon Hill was the last great victory for Celtic Britain over the Saxon invaders, but in the end only set the conquest back by a few decades. Arthur himself was dead by then, betrayed and defeated by his nephew Mordred, but it is said that Arthur only sleeps and will return in a time of dire need – hence the legend that Arthur's dying words were: Bury me in Britain, for I am the Once and Future King.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Once-Future-King-Badon-Hill.mp3

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days

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  • £34.95

    MARCH OF THE HOURS (Brass Band Set) - Emil Soderstrom

    March of the Hours was first performed at Star Lake Music Camp in 1962 with the composer supplying an informative listening guide which was printed in the published score; "The phrases are of 12 crotchets each (three bars) signifying the 12 hours. Up to the trio, the music describes the headlong search for pleasure by the thoughtless. Abruptly, the trio brings 'I need thee every hour', but an episode employing the original theme pushes it aside until it reappears, this time against a background of chimes of the full hour (Westminster chimes). While the hour strikes 12, a paraphrase of the opening strains of 'When the trumpet of the Lord shall sound and time shall be no more' is heard. Here the music stops, to be followed by the trumpet sounding (cornets and trombones) and the rest of the band responds with 'When the roll is called up yonder' with a final 'I'll be there'."

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £27.50

    Pavane for a Dead Princess - Ravel, M.

    The first of Ravel's compositions to achieve success, the effect the composer intended is light and flowing, not, as Ravel once complained, "a dead pavane for a princess". For those interested in these things, the word "dead" of the title is a mistranslation. The French word here is "d?functe" which can, as in English mean "dead", but in this particlar context means "of a former time". "Pavane for a Princess of an Ancient Time" is much more accurate. No more corpses, please !

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £34.95

    March Of The Hours (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Soderstrom, Emil

    March of the Hours was first performed at Star Lake Music Camp in 1962 with the composer supplying an informative listening guide which was printed in the published score; "The phrases are of 12 crotchets each (three bars) signifying the 12 hours. Up to the trio, the music describes the headlong search for pleasure by the thoughtless. Abruptly, the trio brings 'I need thee every hour', but an episode employing the original theme pushes it aside until it reappears, this time against a background of chimes of the full hour (Westminster chimes). While the hour strikes 12, a paraphrase of the opening strains of 'When the trumpet of the Lord shall sound and time shall be no more' is heard. Here the music stops, to be followed by the trumpet sounding (cornets and trombones) and the rest of the band responds with 'When the roll is called up yonder' with a final 'I'll be there'."

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £17.50

    March Of The Hours (Brass Band - Score only) - Soderstrom, Emil

    March of the Hours was first performed at Star Lake Music Camp in 1962 with the composer supplying an informative listening guide which was printed in the published score; "The phrases are of 12 crotchets each (three bars) signifying the 12 hours. Up to the trio, the music describes the headlong search for pleasure by the thoughtless. Abruptly, the trio brings 'I need thee every hour', but an episode employing the original theme pushes it aside until it reappears, this time against a background of chimes of the full hour (Westminster chimes). While the hour strikes 12, a paraphrase of the opening strains of 'When the trumpet of the Lord shall sound and time shall be no more' is heard. Here the music stops, to be followed by the trumpet sounding (cornets and trombones) and the rest of the band responds with 'When the roll is called up yonder' with a final 'I'll be there'."

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £73.00

    Ross Roy (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - De Haan, Jacob

    In this composition, Jacob de Haan sees the "Ross Roy" as a metaphor for the years spent at school (a monument in time), where one's personality is formed. So, the opening theme the artist calls the Ross Roy theme initially has monumental characteristics.The rhythmic motion, which strides along in the lower register and percussion at the beginning of the next section is typical of "Tempo di Marcia". This movement, accompanied by repetitions of sound, is a metaphor for the structure and discipline in school. This is the introduction to a march theme, symbolic of "passing through" the classes up to the final examinations.Then, the Ross Roy theme is dealt with again, now in a playful, humorous variation. As if the composer is saying there should also be time for a smile in school. The same theme can be heard in major key and a slower tempo in the following section, expressing pride and self-confidence. This is also the introduction to the expressive middle section that represents love, friendship and understanding.We then return to the march theme in a slightly altered construction. The oriental sounds, constituting the modulation to the final theme, are symbols of the diversity of cultures in the school. The characteristic final theme first sounds solemn, but turns into a festive apotheosis. It is no coincidence that the final cadence is reminiscent of the close to a traditional overture, for the school years can be considered the "overture" to the rest of one's life.Duration: 9:20

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £34.99

    Take Five (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Desmond, Paul - Sykes, Steve

    The classic jazz number 'Take Five' was first recorded by the Dave Brubeck Quartet and released on its 1959 album Time Out. Composed by Paul Desmond, the group's saxophonist, it became famous for its distinctive, catchy melody and use of quintuple time, from which the piece got its name. This brass band arrangement, by Steve Sykes, captures the jaunty slant of the original.Suitable for Advanced Youth/3rd Section Bands and aboveDuration: 4.00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £69.95

    TRUMPETS OF THE ANGELS (Gregson) (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Gregson, Edward

    The Trumpets of the Angels was commissioned by the Fodens (Courtois) Band for their centenary concert at The Bridgewater Hall in 2000. It is based on a work written for the BBC Philharmonic and Huddersfield Choral Society in 1998, the starting point of which was a quotation from the Book of Revelation:and I saw the seven angels which stood before God; and to them were given seven trumpetsThus the idea behind the work is dramatic and I have tried to achieve this by the spatial deployment of seven solo trumpets around the band, four on-stage, the others off-stage. Six of the solo trumpets eventually join the band, but Trumpet 7 remains off-stage and, indeed, has the most dramatic and extended cadenza representing the words of the seventh angel …and time shall be no more.The Trumpets of the Angels is a large-scale work, scored for seven solo trumpets, brass band, organ and percussion (deploying ‘dark’ instruments such as tam-tams, bass drum and two sets of timpani). The work opens with a four-note motif announced by off-stage horns and baritones and answered by fanfare figures on solo trumpets. In turn, each of the first four solo trumpets play cadenzas and then all four join together, independently playing their own music. The organ enters dramatically with its own cadenza, leading to the entry of solo trumpets 5 and 6 with music that is more urgent and rhythmic, describing the horsemen of the Apocalypse.The music reaches another climax, more intense this time, with the horns and baritones (now on-stage) again sounding the transformed motif, before subsiding into what might be described as a lament for humanity, slow music which builds from low to high, from soft to loud, with a melody that is both simple and poignant. At the climax, Trumpet 7 enters playing the opening four-note motif, dramatically extended to almost three octaves. This cadenza (to the partial accompaniment of tam-tams) introduces new material and foreshadows the ensuing scherzo which is fast and aggressive. Despite the somewhat desolate mood of this music, it slowly moves towards an optimistic conclusion, transforming the ‘humanity’ music into an affirmative and triumphant statement.- Edward Gregson

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days