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  • £53.00

    Suite Symetrique - Jacob de Haan - Menno Haantjes

    This playful three-part suite is largely based on symmetry. This of course is largely due to the relations of the arrangement of the themes; however, on the other hand, to the larger structures in form. The first part, (Prelude et Scherzo) has a solemn opening. Followed by it a related scherzo with many changes in time, this too is composed in a symmetrical form. In the second movement, Choral Dorian, the theme of the prelude is reversed and used in chorale in Dorian tonality. The suite comes to a close with Rondo d'Avignon. An annual theatre festival in a French city on the Rhone inspired this suite. It is a lively movement, symmetrically bought to a finish with a repeat of the prelude from the first movement.

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days
  • £29.95

    BEFORE THE CROSS (Cornet Solo with Brass Band Set) - Edward Gregson

    Written at the request of David Daws for his solo album The Sound of David Daws, this meditation for cornet and brass band uses the composer's own song Before the cross (originally published in The Musical Salvationist, April 1965), the first lines of which are Before the cross I stand in fear and wonder, and see that all my sirs on Thee are laid. The song was written at an early stage of the composer's career, just before commencing study at The Royal Academy of Music, London. After a brief introduction the melody is heard twice, first played by the soloist, then on Euphonium and Flugel Horn with the soloist adding ornate counterpoint before taking up the melody once again, this time leading to a quiet and reflective conclusion.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £117.00

    Spiriti (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

    A Bach chorale stands at the centre of this work (Fur deinen Thron tret ich hiermit).Anton Bruckner was one of Johann Sebastian Bach's great admirers. His work is full of the spirit of that musical genius. For Thomas Doss, it was Bruckner's spirit that always seemed to be with him while working on Spiriti. Bruckner's spirit is captured in this composition by a quote from the chorale of his Fifth Symphony at the end of the piece.The introduction, written in the style of a funeral march, already displays the first fragments of the chorale. Like splinters they are strewn throughout the first Allegro, combining and recombining in turbulent, powerful tutti passages. As the music becomes more rambunctious, the Bach-like fragments begin to swirl around each other, only to be scattered once more.The middle-section is of a more pensive nature. The Religioso character gives the audience time to reflect. The music is meditative and the quarter-note (or crotchet) elements mimic a soul that is yearning and crying out.The third part of the piece finally leads, by way of minimalist elements and the fragments mentioned earlier, to a magnificent presentation of the Bach chorale. As the church bells ring out, one can almost hear the great masters presiding at the organ. 17:00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £47.00

    Suite SymA(c)trique (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

    This playful three-part suite is largely based on symmetry. This of course is largely due to the relations of the arrangement of the themes; however, on the other hand, to the larger structures in form. The first part, (Prelude et Scherzo) has a solemn opening. Followed by it a related scherzo with many changes in time, this too is composed in a symmetrical form. In the second movement, Choral Dorian, the theme of the prelude is reversed and used in chorale in Dorian tonality. The suite comes to a close with Rondo d'Avignon. An annual theatre festival in a French city on the Rhone inspired this suite. It is a lively movement, symmetrically bought to a finish with a repeat of the prelude from the first movement. 05:18

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £64.95

    The Flowers of the Forest (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Bennett, Richard Rodney - Hindmarsh, Paul

    In a preface to the score, the composer explains that ‘the folk song The Flowers of the Forest is believed to date from 1513, the time if the battle of Flodden, in the course of which the archers of the Forest (a part of Scotland) were killed almost to a man’. Bennett had already used the same tune in his Six Scottish Folksongs (1972) for soprano, tenor and piano, and it is the arrangement he made then that forms the starting-point for the brass-band piece. A slow introduction (Poco Adagio) presents the folk song theme three times in succession - on solo cornet, on solo cornets and tenor horns, and on muted ripieno cornets in close harmony - after which the work unfolds through five sections and a coda. Although played without a break, each of these five sections has its own identity, developing elements of the tune somewhat in the manner of variations, but with each arising from and evolving into the next. The first of these sections (Con moto, tranquillo) is marked by an abrupt shift of tonality, and makes much of the slow rises and falls characteristic of the tune itself. The tempo gradually increases, to arrive at a scherzando section (Vivo) which includes the first appearance of the theme in its inverted form. A waltz-like trio is followed by a brief return of the scherzando, leading directly to a second, more extended, scherzo (con brio) based on a lilting figure no longer directly related to the theme. As this fades, a single side drum introduces an element of more overtly martial tension (Alla Marcia) and Bennett says that, from this point on, he was thinking of Debussy’s tribute to the memory of an unknown soldier (in the second movement of En Blanc et noir, for two pianos). Bennett’s march gradually gathers momentum, eventually culminating in a short-lived elegiac climax (Maestoso) before the music returns full-circle to the subdued melancholy of the opening. The work ends with a haunting pianissimo statement of the original tune.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    The Flowers of the Forest (Brass Band - Score only) - Bennett, Richard Rodney - Hindmarsh, Paul

    In a preface to the score, the composer explains that ‘the folk song The Flowers of the Forest is believed to date from 1513, the time if the battle of Flodden, in the course of which the archers of the Forest (a part of Scotland) were killed almost to a man’. Bennett had already used the same tune in his Six Scottish Folksongs (1972) for soprano, tenor and piano, and it is the arrangement he made then that forms the starting-point for the brass-band piece. A slow introduction (Poco Adagio) presents the folk song theme three times in succession - on solo cornet, on solo cornets and tenor horns, and on muted ripieno cornets in close harmony - after which the work unfolds through five sections and a coda. Although played without a break, each of these five sections has its own identity, developing elements of the tune somewhat in the manner of variations, but with each arising from and evolving into the next. The first of these sections (Con moto, tranquillo) is marked by an abrupt shift of tonality, and makes much of the slow rises and falls characteristic of the tune itself. The tempo gradually increases, to arrive at a scherzando section (Vivo) which includes the first appearance of the theme in its inverted form. A waltz-like trio is followed by a brief return of the scherzando, leading directly to a second, more extended, scherzo (con brio) based on a lilting figure no longer directly related to the theme. As this fades, a single side drum introduces an element of more overtly martial tension (Alla Marcia) and Bennett says that, from this point on, he was thinking of Debussy’s tribute to the memory of an unknown soldier (in the second movement of En Blanc et noir, for two pianos). Bennett’s march gradually gathers momentum, eventually culminating in a short-lived elegiac climax (Maestoso) before the music returns full-circle to the subdued melancholy of the opening. The work ends with a haunting pianissimo statement of the original tune.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £95.00 £95.00
    Buy from Superbrass

    KirkFeld

    Grant Kirkhope Grant Kirkhope is a BAFTA nominated British composer who has created the soundtrack for video games that have sold in excess of 30 million copies. From “GoldenEye” to “Banjo-Kazooie”, “Viva Pi?ata” to “Donkey Kong”, “Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning” to “Civilization: Beyond Earth” and “Perfect Dark” to “Castle of Illusion starring Mickey Mouse”. He has also recently scored the feature film “The King’s Daughter” starring Pierce Brosnan and William Hurt and is currently working on “Yooka Laylee” and “Dropzone”. Grant’s score for “Viva Pi?ata” was nominated by BAFTA in the Original Score category in its 2007 awards. Grant is represented by the prestigious Gorfaine/Schwartz Agency by Cheryl Tiano and Kevin Korn. Grant has a degree in music from the Royal Northern College of Music, Manchester, where he majored in classical trumpet, is a green card holder and now lives in Agoura Hills, LA with his wife and two children. “Ian and I first met when we were around 15 years old. We both played in our county orchestra, the North Yorkshire Schools Symphony Orchestra (I was a trumpet player). I think we hit it off straight away, as we were definitely a couple of cheeky kids, if you know what I mean! We both ended up playing in Rowntree Mackintosh Brass Band for a while too which Ian’s Dad, Trevor conducted. We bumped into each other again when we both went for the Shell/LSO Scholarship. I got to the area finals in Manchester so I was pretty pleased with myself but then I saw Ian and I knew it was all over! Of course Ian went on to win and the rest is history. I saw him again when I was attending the Royal Northern College of Music around 1983 by which time Ian had just got the principal chair at the Halle Orchestra. Then I guess 30 something years went by as we both went about our lives and lost touch. We re-kindled our friendship due to his wife really. She emailed me to say it was Ian’s 50th birthday and she was collecting stories from all his friends over the years. After that we got back in touch and then one day on Facebook I got a message from him in typical dry Yorkshire fashion “now then Grant, I had a listen to your music and I think it’s good, how about writing a piece for me ?” I was a little bit unsure at first but of course I loved Ian’s playing and of course I said yes. Over a Skype call in 2016, he asked me what I thought I’d write. I said since I live in LA I’d like to write a “Hollywood” trombone piece. Imagine if John Williams had written a piece for solo trombone, that’s what I’d like to write - well I’d certainly like to try” – Grant Kirkhope

  • £30.00

    Mars, The Bringer of War - Phillip Littlemore

    Holst first became interested in astrology around 1912/13 and so began the gestation for a series of pieces that would utlimately become the suite The Planets . The suite itself was written between 1914 and 1916 and with the exception of Mercury , which was written last, Holst wrote the music in the sequence we now know them, and thus did not present the inner planets of Mercury, Venus and Mars in their planetary order. So, in 1914, came the insistent rhythmic tread of Mars, The Bringer of War . It is widely known that the sketches were completed prior to the outbreak of the First World War, so the music is less a reaction the the declaration of war itself, but more an impending sense of inevitability of a war to unfold. Even though Holst would not have known whether war would be declared as he wrote the music, it is almost certain that the news at the time would have had some influence on the music itself. Its insistent 5/4 rhythm, coupled with the winding melody line, the juxtaposition of keys such as D flat and C major all point to a sense of forboding. Item Code: TPBB-050 Duration: 7'20"

  • £40.00

    Things to Come - Phillip Littlemore

    The 1936 science fiction film Things to Come was written by H G Wells and starred Raymond Massey and Ralph Richardson. It was based on the author’s 1933 novel The Shape of Things To Come , an elaborate prophecy of world war, disease, dictatorship and, finally, a utopia. ? It was Wells himself that approached Bliss to write the music for the film, although Bliss had no experience of writing for this medium. Wells believed that the music was integral and not to be added later, and so several sections of the score were completed before shooting and some of it was used intact. Whether the producer, Alexander Korda, had agreed to this is unclear but, inevitably, some of the music was edited under the watchful eye of Muir Mathieson, who was involved in the project as music director and also working on his first major film. ? Some six months before the release of the film Bliss created an extensive Suite for the BBC, and conducted two-thirds of the special recording sessions himself. Some of the original manuscripts and material from those sessions subsequently disappeared and are now lost. The later concert suite, from 1940 and dedicated to H G Wells, includes six movements of which four have been arranged in this brass band transcription. ? Sir Arthur Bliss (1891–1975) Bliss was one of the most important figures in British musical life from the early 1920s through to his later years when he was Master of the Queen’s Music. He wrote over 140 works for every combination of voice and instrument including large scale orchestral works, operas, ballets, film scores, chamber works, songs and music for brass band. He was composing right up to his death at the age of 83. ? H G Wells (1866–1946) Wells was a writer of science-fiction which also explored social topics of class conflict to evolution. He became a literary sensation almost overnight when his first novel, The Time Machine , was published in 1895. This was followed in quick succession by The Island of Doctor Moreau , The Invisible Man and The War of the Worlds . As an internationally recognised author he travelled extensively gaining notoriety for his radical social and political views. Today he is often referred to as the ‘Father of Science Fiction’. ? Item Code: TPBB-070 Duration: 10’55” ?

  • £20.00 £20.00
    Buy from Wobbleco Music

    Wild Flower Variations - Traditional - Len Jenkins

    The theme for this delightful piece is believed to be Spanish and was originally heard in a Mediterranean church over 30 years ago, sung by the local choir accompanied by local musicians. The theme is not stated separately, and the piece begins directly with the First Variation. The following Variations are subtly different from the First, yet both retain the essential warmth of the Mediterranean sun in their harmonic progression. A short Coda rounds off this relaxing and escapist siesta. Time to wake up...The piece is scored to be playable by most Third or Fourth Section bands.