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  • £135.00

    Music of the Spheres - Philip Sparke

    Music of the Spheres was commissioned by the Yorkshire Building Society Band and first performed by them at the European Brass Band Championships in Glasgow, May 2004. The piece reflects the composers fascination with the origins of the universe and deep space in general. The title comes from a theory, formulated by Pythagoras, that the cosmos was ruled by the same laws he had discovered that govern the ratios of note frequencies of the musical scale. ('Harmonia' in Ancient Greek, which means scale or tuning rather than harmony - Greek music was monophonic). He also believed that these ratios corresponded to the distances of the six known planets from the sun and thatthe planets each produced a musical note which combined to weave a continuous heavenly melody (which, unfortunately, we humans cannot hear). In this work, these six notes form the basis of the sections Music of the Spheres and Harmonia. The pieces opens with a horn solo called t = 0, a name given by some scientists to the moment of the Big Bang when time and space were created, and this is followed by a depiction of the Big Bang itself, as the entire universe bursts out from a single point. A slower section follows called The Lonely Planet which is a meditation on the incredible and unlikely set of circumstances which led to the creation of the Earth as a planet that can support life, and the constant search for other civilizations elsewhere in the universe. Asteroids and Shooting Stars depicts both the benign and dangerous objects that are flying through space and which constantly threaten our planet, and the piece ends with The Unknown, leaving in question whether our continually expanding exploration of the universe will eventually lead to enlightenment or destruction.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £53.00

    Backdraft - Hans Zimmer - Masato Myokoin

    The hit movie Backdraft is one of the earliest soundtracks by award-winning Hollywood composer Hans Zimmer. Starring Kurt Russell amongst many other stars the film plays a dignigned homage to the highly dangerous life of fire workers. Behind the racing engines and blaring sirens the soundtrack is easily lost in the film but is highly charged and a fitting backdrop to the action on screen. This authentic arrangement by Masato Myokoin retains all the excitement and action of the original and will be a great addition to any concert or contest programme. Sure to be a blazing success!

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £128.00

    REM-scapes - Thomas Doss

    Sweet echoes of Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata in the introduction bring a gentle slumber. Breathing is calm and sleep holds the promise of rest and relaxation. With the onset of the REM sleep phase, however, in which most dreams take place and where the day's events are worked through, we hear other sounds played. With distorted sounds, reminiscent of an old gramophone, the music pulls the listener inevitably ever deeper into the dreamscape, in a very realistic dangerous situation that comes to a dramatic head. It triggers a desperate struggle between the impulse to awaken and the exhausting urge to flee. For a short moment, it seems as if the wakeful urge has won out, before dream's powerful spell is again cast, and there's no escape...

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £135.00

    Music of the Spheres (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Sparke, Philip

    Music of the Spheres was commissioned by the Yorkshire Building Society Band and first performed by them at the European Brass Band Championships in Glasgow, May 2004. The piece reflects the composers fascination with the origins of the universe and deep space in general. The title comes from a theory, formulated by Pythagoras, that the cosmos was ruled by the same laws he had discovered that govern the ratios of note frequencies of the musical scale. ('Harmonia' in Ancient Greek, which means scale or tuning rather than harmony - Greek music was monophonic). He also believed that these ratios corresponded to the distances of the six known planets from the sun and thatthe planets each produced a musical note which combined to weave a continuous heavenly melody (which, unfortunately, we humans cannot hear). In this work, these six notes form the basis of the sections Music of the Spheres and Harmonia. The pieces opens with a horn solo called t = 0, a name given by some scientists to the moment of the Big Bang when time and space were created, and this is followed by a depiction of the Big Bang itself, as the entire universe bursts out from a single point. A slower section follows called The Lonely Planet which is a meditation on the incredible and unlikely set of circumstances which led to the creation of the Earth as a planet that can support life, and the constant search for other civilisations elsewhere in the universe. Asteroids and Shooting Stars depicts both the benign and dangerous objects that are flying through space and which constantly threaten our planet, and the piece ends with The Unknown, leaving in question whether our continually expanding exploration of the universe will eventually lead to enlightenment or destruction.Duration: 18:00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £117.00

    REM-scapes (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

    Sweet echoes of Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata in the introduction bring a gentle slumber. Breathing is calm and sleep holds the promise of rest and relaxation. With the onset of the REM sleep phase, however, in which most dreams take place and where the day's events are worked through, we hear other sounds played. With distorted sounds, reminiscent of an old gramophone, the music pulls the listener inevitably ever deeper into the dreamscape, in a very realistic dangerous situation that comes to a dramatic head. It triggers a desperate struggle between the impulse to awaken and the exhausting urge to flee. For a short moment, it seems as if the wakeful urge has won out, before dream's powerful spell is again cast, and there's no escape... 17:00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £125.00

    Music of the Spheres - Philip Sparke

    Music of the Spheres was commissioned by the Yorkshire Building Society Band and first performed by them at the European Brass Band Championships in Glasgow, May 2004. The piece reflects the composers fascination with the origins of the universe and deep space in general. The title comes from a theory, formulated by Pythagoras, that the cosmos was ruled by the same laws he had discovered that govern the ratios of note frequencies of the musical scale. ('Harmonia' in Ancient Greek, which means scale or tuning rather than harmony - Greek music was monophonic). He also believed that these ratios corresponded to the distances of the six known planets from the sun and thatthe planets each produced a musical note which combined to weave a continuous heavenly melody (which, unfortunately, we humans cannot hear). In this work, these six notes form the basis of the sections Music of the Spheres and Harmonia. The pieces opens with a horn solo called t = 0, a name given by some scientists to the moment of the Big Bang when time and space were created, and this is followed by a depiction of the Big Bang itself, as the entire universe bursts out from a single point. A slower section follows called The Lonely Planet which is a meditation on the incredible and unlikely set of circumstances which led to the creation of the Earth as a planet that can support life, and the constant search for other civilizations elsewhere in the universe. Asteroids and Shooting Stars depicts both the benign and dangerous objects that are flying through space and which constantly threaten our planet, and the piece ends with The Unknown, leaving in question whether our continually expanding exploration of the universe will eventually lead to enlightenment or destruction.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £117.00

    REM-scapes (Brass Band) - Thomas Doss

    Sweet echoes of Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata in the introduction bring a gentle slumber. Breathing is calm and sleep holds the promise of rest and relaxation.With the onset of the REM sleep phase, however, in which most dreams take place and where the day's events are worked through, we hear other sounds played.With distorted sounds, reminiscent of an old gramophone, the music pulls the listener inevitably ever deeper into the dreamscape, in a very realistic dangerous situation that comes to a dramatic head. It triggers a desperate struggle between the impulse to awaken and the exhausting urge to flee. For a short moment, it seems as if the wakeful urge has won out, before dream's powerful spell is again cast, and there's no escape...

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £96.00

    Pictures From Wartime (Bra) - Stijn Aertgeerts

    'Pictures From Wartime' tries to describe all aspects of the war era. In the first part, the sadness of seeing friends, family and loved ones leave to the battlefield. The despair as soon as messages of casualties come in, the pain that accompanies it, and then finish this part proudly and with beautiful memories. The connecting second part outlines the battle itself. Heavy, dangerous, do everything to survive and camaraderie between combatants. The last movement shows the evolution of more cowardly and daring war tactics, such as the use of mustard gas, the atomic bomb and all that modernization of weapons has brought us to date. All this for one purpose, peace ?!

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £10.00

    Endurance

    DescriptionMen wanted for hazardous journey.Small wages, bitter cold,long months of complete darkness,constant danger, safe return doubtful.Honour and recognition in case of success.- Ernest Shackleton, 4 Burlington StreetEndurance takes its title from the ship used by Sir Ernest Shackleton's Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition in 1914-15. After many months of fundraising (and reputedly running the above advert in The Times) the Endurance set sail from Plymouth on 6 August 1914. Whilst at sea news of the outbreak of war led Shackleton to put his ship and crew at the disposal of the Admiralty, but their services were not required and they were encouraged to continue. On October 26 1914 they left Grytviken on South Georgia for the Antarctic continent, hoping to find the pack ice shrinking in the Antarctic spring. Two days later, however, they encountered unseasonable ice which slowed their progress considerably. On 15 January 1915, when Endurance was only 200 miles from her intended landfall at Vahsel Bay, the ship became beset by ice which had been compressed against the land to the south by gale force winds. Trapped in the ice of the Weddell Sea, the ship spent the Antarctic winter driven by the weather further from her intended destination until, on 21 November 1915 Endurance broke up forcing the crew to abandon ship and set up camp on the ice at a site they named "Patience Camp".The crew spent several weeks on the ice. As the southern spring started to reduce the extent of the ice shelf they took to their three lifeboats, sailing across the open ocean to reach the desolate and uninhabited Elephant Island. There they used two of the boats to build a makeshift shelter while Shackleton and five others took the largest boat, an open lifeboat named the 'James Caird' and sailed it for 800 terrifyingly dangerous miles across the vast and lonely Southern Atlantic to South Georgia - a journey now widely regarded as one of the greatest and most heroic small-boat journeys ever undertaken. After landing on the wrong side of the island and having to climb over a mountain range in the dark with no map, Shackleton and his companions finally stumbled back into the Grytviken whaling station on 19 May 1916.After resting very briefly to recover his strength, Shackleton then began a relentless campaign to beg or borrow a ship to rescue the rest of his crew from Elephant Island; whaling ships were not strong enough to enter polar ice, but on 30 August 1916, over two years after their departure from Plymouth, Shackleton finally returned to Elephant Island aboard a steam tug borrowed from the Chilean government. Although some were in poor health, every member of the Endurance crew was rescued and returned home alive.Endurance is dedicated to the memory of my mum, who passed away in September 2017.To view a sample PDF score (with watermarks) click here, and you can listen to audio excerpts below.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/Endurance-extracts.mp3

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days

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