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  • £84.95

    Cornet Concerto (Gregson) (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Gregson, Edward

    The Cornet Concerto was commissioned by Black Dyke Band for their principal cornet, Richard Marshall, and was premiered at the European Brass Band Festival’s Gala Concert in Lille, France, on 30 April 2016 by the same performers, conducted by Nicholas Childs.It is challenging work, both musically and technically, and one that exploits the wide range of the instrument’s capabilities. Lasting for some 17 minutes, it is in the usual three movements: Sonata, Intermezzo (subtitled ‘Of More Distant Memories’) and Rondo.The first movement presents four main ideas:Cadenzas (which recur throughout the movement, and indeed appear at the end of the work); a fast and rhythmically energetic motive; Bugle calls (echoing the ancestor of the cornet), and a lyrical and expressive melody, full of yearning. These four ideas are juxtaposed within the broad shape of a Sonata form structure, although here the word ‘Sonata’ is used in its original meaning of ‘sounding together’.The second movement is music in search of a theme, which eventually comes at the end of the movement. In the middle section there are brief quotations, albeit mostly hidden, from three cornet solos written by the Swedish/American composer Erik Leidzen for the Salvation Army in the 1940s and 50s; these are solos I loved as a teenager, and my use of them is by way of tribute, not imitation – a sort of memory bank, just as the main theme of the movement, when it eventually comes, is reminiscent of the tune from my earlier work for brass band, ‘Of Distant Memories’.The final Rondo, the shortest of the three movements, is a lively and ‘fleet-of foot’ Scherzo, its main theme full of cascading arpeggios, but with a contrasting lyrical second theme intertwined in the structure. There is much interplay between soloist and band in the development of the music, but eventually a brief reprise of the opening cadenzas leads to an exciting and climactic coda.Click here for the piano reduction

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £39.95

    Cornet Concerto (Gregson) (Brass Band - Score only) - Gregson, Edward

    The Cornet Concerto was commissioned by Black Dyke Band for their principal cornet, Richard Marshall, and was premiered at the European Brass Band Festival’s Gala Concert in Lille, France, on 30 April 2016 by the same performers, conducted by Nicholas Childs.It is challenging work, both musically and technically, and one that exploits the wide range of the instrument’s capabilities. Lasting for some 17 minutes, it is in the usual three movements: Sonata, Intermezzo (subtitled ‘Of More Distant Memories’) and Rondo.The first movement presents four main ideas:Cadenzas (which recur throughout the movement, and indeed appear at the end of the work); a fast and rhythmically energetic motive; Bugle calls (echoing the ancestor of the cornet), and a lyrical and expressive melody, full of yearning. These four ideas are juxtaposed within the broad shape of a Sonata form structure, although here the word ‘Sonata’ is used in its original meaning of ‘sounding together’.The second movement is music in search of a theme, which eventually comes at the end of the movement. In the middle section there are brief quotations, albeit mostly hidden, from three cornet solos written by the Swedish/American composer Erik Leidzen for the Salvation Army in the 1940s and 50s; these are solos I loved as a teenager, and my use of them is by way of tribute, not imitation – a sort of memory bank, just as the main theme of the movement, when it eventually comes, is reminiscent of the tune from my earlier work for brass band, ‘Of Distant Memories’.The final Rondo, the shortest of the three movements, is a lively and ‘fleet-of foot’ Scherzo, its main theme full of cascading arpeggios, but with a contrasting lyrical second theme intertwined in the structure. There is much interplay between soloist and band in the development of the music, but eventually a brief reprise of the opening cadenzas leads to an exciting and climactic coda.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.99

    Shackleton's Cross (Cornet Solo with Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Goodall, Howard - Hall, Daniel

    Shackleton's Cross was inspired by a painting created in 1957 by the English artist Edward Seago (1910 1974). The title refers to a cross which was erected to the memory of Sir Ernest Shackleton, who led a number of explorations to the Antarctic. Shackleton died in 1922 whilst on a Polar expedition, and the cross can be found on a promontory at the entrance to the bay at Grytviken Whaling Station in South Georgia. The painting is owned by HRH The Duke of Edinburgh, and was part of an exhibition at Buckingham Palace from October 2011 to April 2012. Originally scored for oboe, trumpet and small orchestra, Daniel Hall's sensitive arrangement for trumpet or cornet and brass band follows the composer's alternative version for solo trumpet and organ, created for Crispian Steele-Perkins (trumpet) and David Goode (organ). Duration: 5.00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £29.95

    TO WIN THE WORLD (Cornet and Trombone Double Trio with Brass Band Set) - Stephen Bulla

    This double trio (three cornets and three trombones) was written for the National Capital Band of The Salvation Army in memory of Colonel William Maltby and is based on his own chorus, 'Keep on marching with a fighting faith'. Each solo part is of equal importance so six competent soloists will be required in order to make the piece sparkle!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £32.00

    Blaenwern (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Rowlands, William - Wilkinson, Keith M.

    This arrangement is dedicated to the memory of a much-loved friend and wonderful cornet player, Stephen Howard. Stephen played with the Clacton-on-Sea Band, conducted by his father Robert, and was a frequent guest with the G.U.S. Band directed by Dr. Keith M Wilkinson. Indeed, only a few weeks before his untimely death in 1984, Stephen had played principal cornet with the G.U.S. Band on a tour of Switzerland, performing outstandingly at each concert.The arrangement was first performed at Stephen’s Memorial Service in October, 1984.“Changed from glory into glory,Till in Heaven we take our place,Till we cast our crowns before Thee,Lost in wonder, love and praise.” Charles Wesley

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £53.00

    When Time Will Be No More - James Curnow

    This work was commissioned in memory of Peter J. Swanson, a trumpet and cornet player who tragically died at the tender age of fourteen. Peter's favorite gospel song, Just a Closer Walk with Thee, has been used as the basis for this piece of contrasts which takes the listener through many styles and moods. The spiritual character of the original song resounds gloriously in When Time Will Be No More.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £64.95

    Helvetia - Gareth Wood - -

    I first went to Switzerland in the early 1970's and regularly played at the Lucerne Festival with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. It is a beautiful city, one of my favourite European cities.In writing Helvetia (the Roman name for Switzerland) I wanted to encapsulate the moods that remind me of this wonderful place. The work is in four distinct sections and is on the whole, self-explanatory.It opens with An Alpine Dawn and sunrise, the tubas and euphoniums substituting for the Swiss Alphorns. Next The Clock Shop at Mid-day, a loud ticking, chiming and the sad sound of a cuckoo, builds into the cacophony of the mid-day chimes. The third section is A Walk to Wagner's House. Just along the lake from the centre of town is Tribschen. This walk I have done many times, and it is here that Wagner wrote ‘Tristan'. I have quoted the Dresden Amen (written by J.G. Naumann) which is much used in Parsifal. The final section is The Cesta Run, the most famous bob-sleigh run in the world. As we take each corner, the feeling of speed is demonstrated as only a brass band can do!The work is dedicated to the Cory Band and also to the memory of James Watson, a great cornet player, trumpeter and conductor. It was he who got me into writing for brass band and I hope this piece is worthy.Gareth Wood (Feb. 2011)

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £24.95

    Home of Legends - Paul Lovatt-Cooper - -

    Home of Legends was commissioned by, and composed for the 'Brass Band Summer School'.The music pays homage to the many legends who have been involved with this prestigious institution throughout its history. The BBSS staff are regarded as some of the finest brass players in the world and former Musical Directors and Presidents include the great Harry Mortimer, Philip Jones, Roy Newsome and Richard Evans who directed the world premiere of this work.The music starts with an off-stage trumpet or cornet representing the memory of great players from the past. The band then enters quietly and the piece gradually builds in the style of a majestic musical procession to the final chord designed to show the fantastic sound of a brass band in full flow.In recent times this work has been adopted by the world famous Black Dyke Band from Queensbury - a genuine home of legends for over 150 years.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £64.95

    The Flowers of the Forest (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Bennett, Richard Rodney - Hindmarsh, Paul

    In a preface to the score, the composer explains that ‘the folk song The Flowers of the Forest is believed to date from 1513, the time if the battle of Flodden, in the course of which the archers of the Forest (a part of Scotland) were killed almost to a man’. Bennett had already used the same tune in his Six Scottish Folksongs (1972) for soprano, tenor and piano, and it is the arrangement he made then that forms the starting-point for the brass-band piece. A slow introduction (Poco Adagio) presents the folk song theme three times in succession - on solo cornet, on solo cornets and tenor horns, and on muted ripieno cornets in close harmony - after which the work unfolds through five sections and a coda. Although played without a break, each of these five sections has its own identity, developing elements of the tune somewhat in the manner of variations, but with each arising from and evolving into the next. The first of these sections (Con moto, tranquillo) is marked by an abrupt shift of tonality, and makes much of the slow rises and falls characteristic of the tune itself. The tempo gradually increases, to arrive at a scherzando section (Vivo) which includes the first appearance of the theme in its inverted form. A waltz-like trio is followed by a brief return of the scherzando, leading directly to a second, more extended, scherzo (con brio) based on a lilting figure no longer directly related to the theme. As this fades, a single side drum introduces an element of more overtly martial tension (Alla Marcia) and Bennett says that, from this point on, he was thinking of Debussy’s tribute to the memory of an unknown soldier (in the second movement of En Blanc et noir, for two pianos). Bennett’s march gradually gathers momentum, eventually culminating in a short-lived elegiac climax (Maestoso) before the music returns full-circle to the subdued melancholy of the opening. The work ends with a haunting pianissimo statement of the original tune.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    The Flowers of the Forest (Brass Band - Score only) - Bennett, Richard Rodney - Hindmarsh, Paul

    In a preface to the score, the composer explains that ‘the folk song The Flowers of the Forest is believed to date from 1513, the time if the battle of Flodden, in the course of which the archers of the Forest (a part of Scotland) were killed almost to a man’. Bennett had already used the same tune in his Six Scottish Folksongs (1972) for soprano, tenor and piano, and it is the arrangement he made then that forms the starting-point for the brass-band piece. A slow introduction (Poco Adagio) presents the folk song theme three times in succession - on solo cornet, on solo cornets and tenor horns, and on muted ripieno cornets in close harmony - after which the work unfolds through five sections and a coda. Although played without a break, each of these five sections has its own identity, developing elements of the tune somewhat in the manner of variations, but with each arising from and evolving into the next. The first of these sections (Con moto, tranquillo) is marked by an abrupt shift of tonality, and makes much of the slow rises and falls characteristic of the tune itself. The tempo gradually increases, to arrive at a scherzando section (Vivo) which includes the first appearance of the theme in its inverted form. A waltz-like trio is followed by a brief return of the scherzando, leading directly to a second, more extended, scherzo (con brio) based on a lilting figure no longer directly related to the theme. As this fades, a single side drum introduces an element of more overtly martial tension (Alla Marcia) and Bennett says that, from this point on, he was thinking of Debussy’s tribute to the memory of an unknown soldier (in the second movement of En Blanc et noir, for two pianos). Bennett’s march gradually gathers momentum, eventually culminating in a short-lived elegiac climax (Maestoso) before the music returns full-circle to the subdued melancholy of the opening. The work ends with a haunting pianissimo statement of the original tune.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days