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  • £90.00

    Like a Child - Andreas Schulte

    The young have the future. This is the statement made at the beginning of 'Like a Child' by Andreas Ludwig Schulte. The opening radiates strength and ambition, but one is also made to wonder which direction will be chosen, which choices will have to be made.After the introduction the first steps on the path of life are taken, still somewhat unsteadily (the 3/4th time used illustrates this uncertainty). However, the child has now set off and will meet the future with an open mind, unafraid, even though experience will teach it how easily it can be hurt.Fortunately, it is sometimes allowed to be vulnerable and it discovers there will always be someone to offer shelter, support and love. (Adagio) The last part breathes a far greater independence. Youth is able to face the future, it can even take on the whole world!

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days

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  • £24.95

    Its Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas - Meredith Willson

    Its Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas was originally a hit for Perry Como and the Fontane Sisters with Mitchell Ayres and his Orchestra in 1951.Composed by Meredith Willson, the popular belief was that Willson wrote the song whilst staying in the Grand Hotel in Yarmouth, Nova Scotia.Whilst the arrangement doesn't feature the Fontane sisters, it does seek to capture the full palette of orchestral colour as heard on the 1951 original recording, with tenor horns often playing the part of the female close harmony group.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £90.00

    Cambridgeshire Impressions - Rieks van der Velde

    In a four-part composition Rieks van der Velde takes us to the richly varied area surrounding the university city of Cambridge. The Dutch composer was especially inspired by the atmosphere of Cambridgeshire, the county which lies north of London. 1. The Journey. Although on arrival the area looks peaceful and friendly, the ruggedness of its inhabitants and landscape have an unmistakable influence on the music. In the course of the tour, which starts with an Allegro movement, we are shown the vitality, energy and freshness of the Cambridgeshire countryside. Short themes, swift and sudden motifs and rhythmical patterns supported by the drive of percussion instruments give expression to this image. The first part is concluded by two Calmo movements in which the music expresses how the cathedral in the city of Ely comes into sight and is gradually approached. 2. Visit to Ely Cathedral. The famous Norman cathedral church of Ely, which was built in 1109, has attracted tourists from all over the world apart from being a place of worship and heritage site. A cornet solo introduces the contemplative mood of the composition at this point. The mystical atmosphere of the cathedral runs through this lyrical part like a continuous thread. 3. The Pub. The thirst caused by this intensive journey makes a visit to the local pub a definite must. These "public houses", which may be open until the early hours of the morning, offer all kinds of entertainment. Drinks are served liberally and the atmosphere is lively. 4. The Journey Back. Time has flown: In other words, the moment of departure has come sooner than one would have wished. In a flashback which recaptures elements of the first part of the composition we say goodbye to Cambridgeshire in a fitting manner. Two scintillating final measures bring us abruptly back to the present.

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days

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  • £63.00

    Animal Kingdom - William Vean

    In this composition William Vean takes you on a journey through the fascinating and exciting world of animals. Apart from it being a composition filled with "special effects", Animal Kingdom contains many educational elements, such as playing in swing (triplets feeling), chromatics, flutter tonguing, gypsy tuning, varying keys, and, of course, dynamics and articulation. The melodic lines occur in all four voices, as well as in all percussion parts, providing each musician with the opportunity to play a solo or to accompany. Highly recommended for your youth band! William Vean is an educational composer. He knows how to musically shape the special elements from our daily lives. His music is therefore very expressive, containing creative solutions to possible problems. Special ways of playing make his music particularly interesting for the winds, but the percussion section is also featured in his special effects. The world of the animals always plays on ones imagination. In Animal Kingdom, William Vean has portrayed a number of animals in a special manner: Kevin Kangaroo - The jumping character of this animal can be heard in different voices. The swing style also emphasizes the characteristic movements of the kangaroo. Playing in swing style can be practised by using scales. Eddy Elephant - For some of his smaller fellow fauna friends this can be quite an ordeal, but for Eduard (Eddy for friends and intimates) it is his daily walk. Baldrick Bat - Baldrick the Bat is a mysterious character. This can be heard in the fast moving valves and keys, accompanied by special effects in the percussion section. Curtis Camel - Curtis the Camel trudges across the desert, feeling bored. The idea that the horizon will never change does not affect him anymore. He has accepted his fate. The distinctive tones from the gypsy scale provide the suitable oriental sounds. Betty Butterfly - Butterfly Betty elegantly, and without worries, flutters from flower to flower in the garden. Her motto: Carpe Diem (Seize the Day). Betty is a one-day butterfly. Marvin Monkey - A "swing" monkey stirs up the feelings. Even members of the orchestra will look like real monkeys. How about your audience? Each part has its own difficulties and challenges. Important in the first part is playing "in swing" (triplets feeling). This can be practised using scales. In the second part ensemble playing and balance are important. In Baldrick additional information on the effects that have to be played might be useful. "New" sounds are, of course, welcome. Curtis the Camel introduces the gypsy scale. Additional explanation of the use of the scale might be useful. Key changes are interesting in this part. A slight accent on the first beat of the bar will add to the charm of this part. Marvin the Monkey brings back the swing rhythm that was introduced in the first part, alternated by a "straight" part with attention to chromatics and articulation. A story teller will definitely be an asset when performing this composition.

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days

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  • £63.00

    Durkle Bandrydge Suite - Bruce Fraser

    Durkle Bandrydge is the name of the composers imaginary world, but it could very well be anyones invisible dream world with a different name. In this very versatile suite by Bruce Fraser, 8 characters are featured, each with its own peculiarities, making Durkle Bandrydge such a colourful place. Do these characters differ that much from us? That is for you to find out! In the last part, all characters come together in a special way.Durkle Bandrydge exists at the end of your street. It is invisible to humans, but Durkle Bandrygators can watch us with great interest. The music will introduce you to some of the characters who live in this unusual place. The parts: Somnanbulyss, who is a giant troll guarding the entrance to Durkle Bandryde. At least, he is supposed to, but he tends to sleep most of the time. His music is therefore very slow moving and sleepy. Long Gwysteen is a tall, mysterious, and somehow sophisticated character, who walls around with a shell on his back. His music glides along rather gracefully. Squelfitch is a rather unpleasant and smelly character who lives in a bog, which is why his music sounds rather slimy and a bit like trying to walk through quicksand. Perfydlia is a meddling old woman, who gossips about everybody and squeals with sudden delight at the small exciting bits of tittletattle about others in the village. In the music you can hear her sudden little squeals of delight. Maryann Lovely is a beautiful young lady, graceful, gorgeous, absolutely devine, and her music is obviously just the same. Thistledoo Nicely is a lively character who spends and spends and spends with her credit card, buying the latest fashion and never worries about having to pay the bills. Her music reflects her excitement when shopping and het 'happy go lucky' approach to life. Marsyn Edginton is the Lord of the manor, the richest man in town, the 'big cheese', the man with all the power and, of course, the biggest house. He is very grand and his music like he could be a king. Jimmy McScotsmyn is a red haired scotsman wearing tartan cap. He misses his home country terribly and eats lots of shortbread, oatcakes, scotch eggs, porridge and drinks an enormous amount of Scotch Wisky, which helps him to have fond memories of the kind of music he would like to dance to when he was a younger man. His favourite dance is a Jig and this is the music he remembers. Grand March of the Durkle Bandrydgators. We hope that you have enjoyed meeting these characters from Drukle Bandrydge and would invite you to listen to all the villagers now march along in a grand parade - it is a pity that you can not see them, what is a wonderful sight. If you listen carefully, you will hear the melodies which belong to the characters as they march past. Oh what a grand spectacle!

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days

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  • £44.00

    Minerva - Jan Van der Roost

    Minerva by Jan Van der Roost was composed on the commission of the German "Musikverein Braunshausen" on the occasion of the 75th anniversary of the orchestra. The composition, first performed on September 17, 1999, is not a street march but a concert march, just like Mercury and Arsenal. The use and variation of different rhythmic patterns gives the first part of this march a distinctly dynamic character. Two main themes are presented in several instrumental combinations. The theme from the trio, on the other hand, is characterized by a broad melodic approach using large intervals. This theme, wreathed by high woodwinds, is heard one more time after a contrasting new part, but now in a somewhat slower tempo. The counterpoint in this part refers to the first part of the march. The brilliant ending suits a festive anniversary march!

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days
  • £12.00

    Dragon Dances

    Dragon Dances was commissioned by Owen Farr, who is also the work's dedicatee, gave the first performance with the Cornwall Youth Band conducted by Richard Evans on 5 April 2010 and has recorded it on his solo CD "A New Dawn" accompanied by the Cory Band conducted by Philip Harper.Being a Welsh composer, writing music for a Welsh soloist, I was naturally keen to reflect this in the music, and I drew inspiration from two particularly Welsh concepts - "hiraeth" and "hwyl". "Hiraeth" is a word that has no direct translation into English, but an approximation would be 'yearning for home'. Like the other celtic nations, Wales has a widespread diaspora of people who left to seek new lives out in the empire and "hiraeth" is a way of summing up the homesickness felt by these exiles, some of whom return each year for a special ceremony at the Royal National Eisteddfod. "Hwyl" is an even more complicated word, variously meaning ecstatic joy, fervour, equable temperament and even the characteristic sing-song oration style of the great Welsh Methodist preachers.I have attempted to make the music reflect both of these, with the melancholy first part of the work inspired by the hymns and solo songs for which Wales is famous, and the second part having a much more dance-like, joyful quality.To view a PDF preview of the full score, click here; to view a preview of the solo part click here.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days

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  • £79.95

    Waiting for a Pain Hit!??!!? - Paul McGhee

    Waiting For a Pain Hit!??!!? was written during November and December 2006 as an entry in the 2006/07 Swiss Brass Band Association Composers Competition. It was later chosen as the Championship Section set test piece for the 2010 Swiss National Brass Band Championships.The piece originates from sketches for a Brass Quintet which was written whilst I was in my second year of studies at the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama. The piece, now being much more elaborate both musically and structurally than the original, aims to explore the many various textures available to a large brass ensemble. The aims of the piece, from its earliest stages, were mainly exploration of textures as well as dealing with issues of continuity and whilst the piece certainly contains challenging technical elements, they were not a driving force behind its inception and more organically grew from the primary aims of the piece. I was purposefully looking throughout the writing and editing process to create a piece of music with a seamless, ethereal quality to both the structure and the musical content.There are no 'performance directions' throughout the piece, the reasoning for this is explained below. However, I have spent much time and thought over the tempo markings throughout the piece and the tempos throughout the piece are the desired tempi and care should be taken with these. The tempo markings contained throughout the piece form a vital part of the structure and affect the continuity of the piece. Metronome marks contained within a box show the tempo of the new section in relation to the tempo that precedes it by use of metronome modulations. Any alterations tothe tempo of the section that precedes it will alter the boxed metronome marks.The title of a piece of music, please forgive my generalisation, is to give an insight into 'what a piece is about'. I suppose that this piece is no different, but with the title being slightly abstract I shall resist the temptation to reveal what it means to me. The title, I feel, needs to be open to interpretation along with the music within. That's the way, with this piece especially, I like my music to be. Freedom to find our own meaning and a way to express it from within the score is vital. It is only then that the piece can take on its own identity and grow in ways that even I might not have imagined, revealing different sides to its personality with each performance.Before the music begins I have included some text. Do these words hold the key to the music?! Can they help??!I DON'T KNOW!!!I just like the rhythms, the pulse and the imagery. Hopefully all of this can help to create a picture. But let it be your picture...Paul McGhee, June 2010.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £69.95

    TRANSFORMATION (Brass Band Set) - Kenneth Downie

    I believe in transformation, God can change the hearts of men, And refine the evil nature, till it glows with grace again'. So wrote John Gowans in the second verse of his great hymn, 'I believe that God the Father, can be seen in God the Son', written specifically to affirm Salvationists' beliefs. It is sung to the tune Bethany and in seeking to explore this great subject at the heart of the Christian gospel in musical terms, the composer has used this fine tune as the basis. Although it never appears in its entirety, it is seldom out of the picture and much of the work is derived from it. The other main source of material is the lovely, simple chorus, 'Some day I shall be like him, changed to heavenly beauty, when his face I see'. This chorus is especially prominent in the middle section but there are important references to it throughout. There are also brief references to Charles Wesley's hymn, 'Love Divine' and, in particular, the telling lines, 'Changed from glory into glory, till in Heaven we take our place'. The work suggests that, at times, the process of being transformed is a struggle, portrayed with many passages of fraught and demanding music. Considerable reserves of stamina and technique are required while, in contrast, the chorus, 'Some day I shall be like him' provides the warm, gentle centre of the work. The premiere of the work was given by The International Staff Band of The Salvation Army in Cadogan Hall on Friday 3rd June 2011, as part of the band's 120th anniversary celebrations.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £27.50

    LUX AETERNA (Brass Band) - Harper, Philip

    The title Lux Aeterna (Eternal Light) can he interpreted on a number of levels. Musically it has a rather mystical feel to it,and the single note with which the piece begins continues uninterrupted throughout, like an inextinguishable flame, ora constant source of hope. There are lyrical and song like solo lines for cornet, flugel and euphonium. This composition was performed as part of the Cory Band's winning Brass in Concert programme in 2012.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days