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  • £48.00

    Colour of Brass - Bertrand Moren

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days

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  • £43.00
  • £69.95

    Four Etudes (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Gregson, Edward

    This work was written during August and September 2016. In it, I wanted primarily to explore the elements of timbre, rhythm, texture and colour. The first three ?tudes (or studies) are based on a set of piano pieces I composed in 1982, whilst the last, the longest of the set, was composed specially. My reference point was the Four ?tudes for orchestra of 1928 by Stravinsky, a work I have always admired, and of which the first three also happen to be based on a set of earlier pieces, in his case for string quartet, with the last being a re-arrangement of a work for pianola. I have also borrowed the titles he gave to the individual studies as they seemed to fit the mood of my pieces.However, the exception is the final study, where instead of the exuberant mood of his colourful portrayal of Madrid, mine was influenced by the terrible human tragedy that was unfolding in Aleppo at the time I was writing it, and thus reflects the violence and barbarism of those events; yet towards the end it does offer a glimmer of hope for humanity with a return to the Canticle (Song) of the first study, and concludes quietly with the chords and bells that began the work. The titles of the ?tudes are Canticle, Dance, Excentrique, and Aleppo. Like Stravinsky’s, the set is relatively short, lasting around 8 minutes.The Four ?tudes were commissioned by Black Dyke Band and were written specially for the recording marking the conclusion of my year as Composer-in-Residence. The concert premiere will be given by Black Dyke Band, conducted by the composer, at the RNCM Festival of Brass in January 2017.- Edward Gregson

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £29.95

    Four Etudes (Brass Band - Score only) - Gregson, Edward

    This work was written during August and September 2016. In it, I wanted primarily to explore the elements of timbre, rhythm, texture and colour. The first three ?tudes (or studies) are based on a set of piano pieces I composed in 1982, whilst the last, the longest of the set, was composed specially. My reference point was the Four ?tudes for orchestra of 1928 by Stravinsky, a work I have always admired, and of which the first three also happen to be based on a set of earlier pieces, in his case for string quartet, with the last being a re-arrangement of a work for pianola. I have also borrowed the titles he gave to the individual studies as they seemed to fit the mood of my pieces.However, the exception is the final study, where instead of the exuberant mood of his colourful portrayal of Madrid, mine was influenced by the terrible human tragedy that was unfolding in Aleppo at the time I was writing it, and thus reflects the violence and barbarism of those events; yet towards the end it does offer a glimmer of hope for humanity with a return to the Canticle (Song) of the first study, and concludes quietly with the chords and bells that began the work. The titles of the ?tudes are Canticle, Dance, Excentrique, and Aleppo. Like Stravinsky’s, the set is relatively short, lasting around 8 minutes.The Four ?tudes were commissioned by Black Dyke Band and were written specially for the recording marking the conclusion of my year as Composer-in-Residence. The concert premiere will be given by Black Dyke Band, conducted by the composer, at the RNCM Festival of Brass in January 2017.- Edward Gregson

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £55.00 £55.00
    Buy from PHM Publishing

    The Unfortunate Traveller, Suite for brass band by Imogen Holst

    Imogen Holst was inspired to write this suite after the success of her father's Moorside Suite at theNational Brass band Championships in 1928. She submitted it as part of her 1930 portfolio at the RoyalCollege of Music. The title was taken from Thomas Nashe's 1594 romance. Imogen Holst conducted thework with the Carlisle St. Stephen's Band in 1933, after which it remained unperformed until revived in thisnew performing edition by Zone One Brass in Ulverston in 2011. The new performing edition of this livelyand tuneful work gives the music more variety of colour. The suite is a valuable addition to the repertoirefrom a golden period of brass band composition and is ideal for youth and community bands to performin concert or contest.Grade 4Duration: 11 minsPublished in association with G & I Holst Ltd.?55 plus postage and packing, extra score ?10PHM001

  • £30.00

    SORCERER'S APPRENTICE, The (Brass Band) - Dukas, Paul - Littlemore, Phillip

    French composer Paul Dukas wrote his symphonic poem, The Sorcerer's Apprentice, between 1896 and 1897. Subtitled 'Scherzo after a ballad by Goethe', the piece was inspired by Goethe's 1797 poem of the same name. By far the most performed and recorded of Dukas' works, perhaps it's most notable appearance was in the Walt Disney animated film Fantasia from 1940, which led to the piece becoming widely known to audiences outside the classical concert hall.. The original orchestral work is some 10 minutes in length, however this brass band transcription has been abridged to create a more manageable 6-minute work, yet retains the urgency, magic and colour of the original.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £24.95

    The Pilgrim's Prayer (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Rouse, Sydney - Ball, Eric

    Introduction - This could hardly be more simple. Inexperienced players may have some little difficulty in intonation, especially as they are starting 'cold', but a useful lesson can be learned in this connection when rehearsing these two bars. Section A - The music is hymn tune-like in character, but it should not become stilted. Close intonation is still a point to study, especially in view of the chromatic nature of some of the harmony. Section B - Aim to secure just balance in the accompanying parts, especially in the second phrase, where the 1st comets may be inclined to treat their moving part as an independent melody rather than part of the 'colour' background. Section C -This is a reprise of the first theme, with a different arrangement. The same comments apply, however. Section D - Here the music becomes more song-like in style, and provides an interesting contrast. The scoring, too, is more varied, and there are a number of points that call for attention. Note that the 1st and 2nd comets and 2nd trombone work as a team throughout; see that the pulsating, syncopated background adds to the movement of the music without giving a jerky effect; the new entries in the fourth and twelfth bars are to be made quite smoothly; and do not allow the texture of the music, especially in the last eight bars of the section, to overshadow the simplicity of the main tune. Section E - Here the first subject appears again. In the arrangement the colour contrasts are quite clear-cut. In order to secure true balance in the fifth and sixth bars, it may be necessary to adjust the amount of tone given by the bass trombone, as this part is not doubled as are the other parts. Section F -This section forms a simple but expressive coda.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £12.50

    The Pilgrim's Prayer (Brass Band - Score only) - Rouse, Sydney - Ball, Eric

    Introduction - This could hardly be more simple. Inexperienced players may have some little difficulty in intonation, especially as they are starting 'cold', but a useful lesson can be learned in this connection when rehearsing these two bars. Section A - The music is hymn tune-like in character, but it should not become stilted. Close intonation is still a point to study, especially in view of the chromatic nature of some of the harmony. Section B - Aim to secure just balance in the accompanying parts, especially in the second phrase, where the 1st comets may be inclined to treat their moving part as an independent melody rather than part of the 'colour' background. Section C -This is a reprise of the first theme, with a different arrangement. The same comments apply, however. Section D - Here the music becomes more song-like in style, and provides an interesting contrast. The scoring, too, is more varied, and there are a number of points that call for attention. Note that the 1st and 2nd comets and 2nd trombone work as a team throughout; see that the pulsating, syncopated background adds to the movement of the music without giving a jerky effect; the new entries in the fourth and twelfth bars are to be made quite smoothly; and do not allow the texture of the music, especially in the last eight bars of the section, to overshadow the simplicity of the main tune. Section E - Here the first subject appears again. In the arrangement the colour contrasts are quite clear-cut. In order to secure true balance in the fifth and sixth bars, it may be necessary to adjust the amount of tone given by the bass trombone, as this part is not doubled as are the other parts. Section F -This section forms a simple but expressive coda.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £29.95

    By Trevone Bay - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    By Trevone Bay was composed for Flugel Soloist Zoe Hancock and the Black Dyke Band to celebrate both their Double Champion Victory at the British Open and National Championships 2014 and Zoe's unique achievement in winning the Best Soloist Award in both contests - an accomplishment never done before. The world premier was performed by Zoe and the band at Birmingham's Symphony Hall on February 8th 2015.By Trevone Bay is a lovely lyrical slow melody that utilises the full range and colour of the flugel horn. Starting with an atmospheric opening the soloist performs the main theme, which repeats with more colour in the accompanying parts and solo line. After introducing a second theme from the ensemble, the solo cornets perform the main melody with the soloist enjoying a lyrical counter melody. The piece develops with a tranquil middle section from the soloist that builds for the second theme to return, performed by the ensemble while the soloist soars over the top. Ending as it starts, the piece dies away to leave the soloist performing the opening melodic phrase to a tranquil close.As for the title: Trevone Bay is a beautiful tiny bay in Cornwall, close to Zoe's home town of Roche. Its tranquil waters lead out to the Celtic Sea and provide a picturesque landscape. The views there can be enjoyed all year round but they are particularly beautiful at sunset.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £29.95

    Song for the Skies - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Song for the Skies was commissioned by Tuba virtuoso Les Neish and was given its world premier on the December 9th 2010 with the James Madison University Brass Band in Harrisonburg, Virginia, USA.Les asked me to compose a slow melody that highlights the wonderful sonorous sound of the Tuba. I am a big fan of Les and of the instrument and knowing the capabilities of Les as a soloist I wanted to experiment with the range and colour of the instrument in this solo.After a warm introduction from the ensemble the soloist enters almost timeless over the muted cornets. The melody when it is first heard has a somewhat haunting Celtic feel to it. It is intentionally marked as con rubato so that the soloist can really put their own musical stamp on the music. As the haunting melody repeats again this time in a change of key the accompaniment takes more of a role within the piece of music performing counter melodies within this second section.The middle of the piece introduces a new secondary melodic device that serves as an introduction to the original melody played in all its glory by the ensemble. This dies away to leave the second half of the melody in the euphoniums and baritones as the soloist plays a soaring counter melody in the highest register of the instrument.The piece starts to return home with a recapitulation of the introduction followed by the second part of the original melody by the soloist. After a momentary reflective solo from the soloist the introduction is used for a final time before the tuba guides us home to conclude.For the soloist, there are a number of occasions where the opportunity to play in the upper register of the instrument arises. However, I have also given the opportunity for the soloist to play various passages down the octave so it suits the performers playing style and range.Song for the Skies is very simple yet beautiful and I feel it suits the playing of the Eb Tuba perfectly. I hope you enjoy performing it.Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days