Searching for Wind Band Music? Visit the Wind Band Music Shop
We've found 3 matches for your search

Results

  • £49.99 £49.99
    Buy from Marcato Brass

    Poppyfields | Kevin Bell

    It is 4.15am on 8th August 1918, and a British soldier waits for the whistle which will send him 'over the top' and into battle. Beginning with the Battle, entering a dream-like section as our hero advances forwards, followed by random skirmishes, before Battle ends and we enter a lyrical reflective section where the soldiers thoughts turn to home. Finally a lone cornet heralds a tribute to the Fallen, and answered by the euphonium, calls for hope for a new dawn and a better world. There is an optional narration from our soldierbefore the piece starts, and alsohis reflections of war and home after the battle is over, however the piece is written to be played with or without narration. This piece by Kevin Bell has it all: excitement, surprise, reflection and hope.

  • £65.00 £65.00
    Buy from PHM Publishing

    A Wartime Sketchbook by William Walton, arr. Paul Hindmarsh

    During World War II, William Walton, one of the most eminent of British composers, provided music for several films deemed to be of 'national importance'. Scoring Lawrence Olivier's Shakespeare epic Henry V in 1943 was the most substantial of these wartime projects. His role in patriotic films from 1941 and 42 like The Foreman Went to France, Next of Kin, Went the day Well? and The First of the Few was to provide appropriate title music and some underscoring at key moments. Walton extracted the most substantial portions of the latter as the popular Spitfire Prelude and Fugue for orchestra. The remaining music remained unpublished until 1990, when Christopher Palmer assembled the highlights from the soundtracks into A Wartime Sketchbook, ssix numbers of which were arranged into a colourful suite for Besses o' th' Barn and Black Dyke Mills bands in the 1990s. 1. Prologue: This is the stirring title music from Went the day Well?, a screen play by Graham Greene about a German airborne invasion of an English village. The main theme leads to (2) Bicycle Chase, characteristic musical high-jinks for J.B.Priestley's The Foreman went to France. (3) Refugees, from the same film, is a poignant accompaniment to the long march of refugees, while (4) Young Siegfrieds is a lively movement comes from the music that Walton composed for The Battle of Britain in 1968, but which the film's producer rejected. It portrays first the Berliners, cheerfully ignoring the black-out and then, in the trio, the Young Siegfrieds of the Luftwaffe, courtesy of a parody of Siegfried's horn call from Wagner's opera. In (5) Romance from Next of Kin, a soldier and a Dutch refugee snatch a few tender moments together. (6) Epilogue: at the end of The Foreman went to France, the French look forward with hope and optimism to eventual liberation. Romance (3') and Young Siegrfireds (4') can be performed separately. Duration: 14 mins Published by arrangement with the copyright holders, Oxford University Press. ?65, plus postage and packingPHM Catalogue No. PHM008

  • £90.00

    Scottish Dances - Peter Martin - Menno Haantjes

    Scottish Dances is based on three Scottish traditionals: Cock of the North, The Bonnie Bank's O'Loch Lomond and Marie's Wedding. I. Cock of the North's name is used for multiple things or events. For example for a locomotive to a famous, it seems, delicious liqueur, and rallies to snowboard competitions. Furthermore is "Cock O' the North " a nickname of a famous Duke. (The 4th Duke of Gordon). In this composition Cock of the North (a Jig) is a traditional Scottish bagpipe tune, regularly played on tattoos by Pipe Bands. Not infrequently the drummers sing the text. Auntie Mary, had a canary, Up the leg of her trousers While she was sleeping I was peeping Up the leg of her trousers. II. " The Bonnie Bank's O'Loch Lomond " is about a sad story that took place during an revolt against the British. In 1745 Bonnie Prince Charlie had to retreat. Two of his men were captured. One was convicted and executed, while the other was released. The spirit of the executed soldier would arrive in Scotland via the 'low road' (underworld) before his companion, who had still a long way to go. You'll take the high road And I'll take the low road And I'll be in Scotland afore ye But me and my true love will never meet again On the Bonnie Bonnie Banks of Loch Lomond III. In a Scottish wedding, after the official ceremonies, there is often danced. This is called a ceilidh. For this we use traditional Scottish music such as "Marie's Wedding '. Mid dance we go back to the church, where a lovely song in honor of the couple sounds. Marie's Wedding has been recorded by Van Morrison (among many others). Step we gaely, on we go, heel for heel and toe for toe Arm and arm and on we go, all for Marie's wedding

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

     PDF View Music