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  • £74.95

    Eden - John Pickard

    This work was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the final of the 2005 Besson National Brass Band Championship, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London.The score is prefaced by the final lines from Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost (completed in 1663), in which Adam and Eve, expelled from Paradise, make their uncertain way into the outside world:“…The world was all before them, where to chooseTheir place of rest, and providence their guide:They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow,Through Eden took their solitary way.”My work is in three linked sections. In the first, the characters of Adam, Eve and the serpent guarding the Tree of Knowledge are respectively represented by solo euphonium, cornet and trombone. The music opens in an idyllic and tranquil mood and leads into a duet between euphonium and cornet. Throughout this passage the prevailing mood darkens, though the soloists seem to remain oblivious to the increasingly fraught atmosphere. A whip-crack announces the malevolent appearance of the solo trombone who proceeds to engage the solo cornet in a sinister dialogue.The second section interprets the Eden story as a modern metaphor for the havoc mankind has inflicted upon the world, exploiting and abusing its resources in the pursuit of wealth. Though certainly intended here as a comment on the present-day, it is by no means a new idea: Milton himself had an almost prescient awareness of it in Book I of his poem, where men, led on by Mammon:“…Ransacked the centre and with impious handsRifled the bowels of their mother earthFor treasures better hid. Soon had his crewOpened into the hill a spacious woundAnd digged out ribs of gold.”So this section is fast and violent, at times almost manic in its destructive energy. At length a furious climax subsides and a tolling bell ushers in the third and final section.This final part is slow, beginning with an intense lament featuring solos for tenor-horn, fl?gel-horn and repiano cornet and joined later by solo baritone, soprano cornet, Eb-bass and Bb-bass.At one stage in the planning of the work it seemed likely that the music would end here – in despair. Then, mid-way through writing it, I visited the extraordinary Eden Project in Cornwall. Here, in a disused quarry – a huge man-made wound in the earth – immense biomes, containing an abundance of plant species from every region of the globe, together with an inspirational education programme, perhaps offer a small ray of hope for the future. This is the image behind the work’s conclusion and the optimism it aims to express is real enough, though it is hard-won and challenged to the last.John Pickard 2005

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £74.95

    Eden - Score & Parts - John Pickard

    This work was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the final of the 2005 Besson National Brass Band Championship, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London.The score is prefaced by the final lines from Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost (completed in 1663), in which Adam and Eve, expelled from Paradise, make their uncertain way into the outside world:“…The world was all before them, where to chooseTheir place of rest, and providence their guide:They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow,Through Eden took their solitary way.”My work is in three linked sections. In the first, the characters of Adam, Eve and the serpent guarding the Tree of Knowledge are respectively represented by solo euphonium, cornet and trombone. The music opens in an idyllic and tranquil mood and leads into a duet between euphonium and cornet. Throughout this passage the prevailing mood darkens, though the soloists seem to remain oblivious to the increasingly fraught atmosphere. A whip-crack announces the malevolent appearance of the solo trombone who proceeds to engage the solo cornet in a sinister dialogue.The second section interprets the Eden story as a modern metaphor for the havoc mankind has inflicted upon the world, exploiting and abusing its resources in the pursuit of wealth. Though certainly intended here as a comment on the present-day, it is by no means a new idea: Milton himself had an almost prescient awareness of it in Book I of his poem, where men, led on by Mammon:“…Ransacked the centre and with impious handsRifled the bowels of their mother earthFor treasures better hid. Soon had his crewOpened into the hill a spacious woundAnd digged out ribs of gold.”So this section is fast and violent, at times almost manic in its destructive energy. At length a furious climax subsides and a tolling bell ushers in the third and final section.This final part is slow, beginning with an intense lament featuring solos for tenor-horn, fl?gel-horn and repiano cornet and joined later by solo baritone, soprano cornet, Eb-bass and Bb-bass.At one stage in the planning of the work it seemed likely that the music would end here – in despair. Then, mid-way through writing it, I visited the extraordinary Eden Project in Cornwall. Here, in a disused quarry – a huge man-made wound in the earth – immense biomes, containing an abundance of plant species from every region of the globe, together with an inspirational education programme, perhaps offer a small ray of hope for the future. This is the image behind the work’s conclusion and the optimism it aims to express is real enough, though it is hard-won and challenged to the last.John Pickard 2005

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    Three Burns Portraits - Rodney Newton

    Robert Burns (1759-1796) was one of the most colourful literary figures of the 18th Century. The son of a tenant farmer, he was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, and earned a living variously as a farmer, flax dresser and exercise man, gradually establishing himself as a poet, lyricist and collector of folksongs. A charismatic character, by the time of his death he had become Scotland's best known and best-loved poet. This work depicts three characters from his personal life who also figure in his poetry. Although Burns intended much of his verse to be sung, and even wrote tunes himself for many of his lyrics, all the melodies in this work are original.I John AndersonJohn Anderson (1759-1832) was an Ayrshire carpenter and close friend to Robert Burns, who immortalised Anderson in his affectionate poem John Anderson Ma Jo, which imagines both men in old age (although Burns was only 37 when he died). Anderson is reputed to have made Robert Burns' coffin and survived the wrecking of the paddle steamer Cornet at Craignish Point near Oban during a storm in 1820, an event incorporated into this movement. This is a picture of a tough, resilient Scot who meets the storms of Life head-on.II Mary CampbellRobert Burns had numerous love affairs, sometimes with more than one woman at a time. Mary Campbell, a sailor's daughter from the highland district of Dunoon, had entered service with a family in Ayrshire when she met Burns. Although involved with another woman at the time, Burns was smitten with Campbell and there is evidence to suggest that he planned to emigrate to Jamaica with Mary. However, nothing came of this wild scheme and Mary, fearing disgrace and scandal left the area but not before Burns had enshrined her in at least two poems, Highland Mary and To Mary Campbell. Significantly, the first line of the latter runs, "Will ye go to the Indies, my Mary, and leave auld Scotia's Shore?" (His ardent pleading can be heard in the middle section of the movement). Mary's music paints a portrait of a graceful young lady who had the presence of mind not to be entirely won over by the charms of Robert Burns.III Douglas GrahamBurns was a heavy drinker, and this is most likely a contribution to his early death. He was matched in this capacity by his friend, Douglas ‘Tam' Graham, a farmer who sought solace in the bottle from an unhappy marriage. Burns used his drinking partner as a model for the comic poem, Tam O'Shanter, which tells of a drunken Ayrshire farmer who encounters a Witches' Sabbath and escapes with his life, but at the cost of his horse tail. The story was said to be made up by Graham himself to placate his fearsome, but very superstitious, wife after he arrived home one night, worse the wear for drink and with his old mare's tail cropped by some village prankster. This present piece depicts Tam enjoying a riotous night at a local hostilely in the company of his friends, John Anderson and ‘Rabbie' Burns.Rodney Newton - 2013

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £69.95

    TRANSFORMATION (Brass Band Set) - Kenneth Downie

    I believe in transformation, God can change the hearts of men, And refine the evil nature, till it glows with grace again'. So wrote John Gowans in the second verse of his great hymn, 'I believe that God the Father, can be seen in God the Son', written specifically to affirm Salvationists' beliefs. It is sung to the tune Bethany and in seeking to explore this great subject at the heart of the Christian gospel in musical terms, the composer has used this fine tune as the basis. Although it never appears in its entirety, it is seldom out of the picture and much of the work is derived from it. The other main source of material is the lovely, simple chorus, 'Some day I shall be like him, changed to heavenly beauty, when his face I see'. This chorus is especially prominent in the middle section but there are important references to it throughout. There are also brief references to Charles Wesley's hymn, 'Love Divine' and, in particular, the telling lines, 'Changed from glory into glory, till in Heaven we take our place'. The work suggests that, at times, the process of being transformed is a struggle, portrayed with many passages of fraught and demanding music. Considerable reserves of stamina and technique are required while, in contrast, the chorus, 'Some day I shall be like him' provides the warm, gentle centre of the work. The premiere of the work was given by The International Staff Band of The Salvation Army in Cadogan Hall on Friday 3rd June 2011, as part of the band's 120th anniversary celebrations.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £35.00

    In Pitch Black - Lucy Pankhurst

    An extremely emotional and poignant work for brass band composed by Lucy Pankhurst, in memory and tribute to those affected by the Pretoria Pit disaster in Lancashire on 21st December 1910. The piece is chilling in its depiction of the tragic story, sensitively conveying the atmosphere and emotions as perceived before, during and after the event. Through its use of playing techniques, effects, sound combinations and even silences, In Pitch Black offers a powerfully reflective piece.Pritoria Pit DisasterLancashire’s worst pit disaster and Britain’s third largest loss of life from a single mining accident happened at the No. 3 Bank Pit belonging to the Hulton Colliery Company, just 4 days before Christmas 1910. The pit known as the 'Pretoria Pit' was situated on Hulton Parkland on the border of Atherton and Westhoughton. An explosion occurred at 7.50 am on Wednesday, 21 December 1910, resulting in the death of 344 men and boys, including many members of The Wingates Band.The Writing ExperienceDuring Lucy's research for this work, she acknowledges that she found the harsh reality from the shocking images and historical accounts of the event most disturbing, and is not embarrassed to disclose that it was wholly a very emotional experience in creating the composition. Consequently, she chose to create something to illustrate the true emotion of the situation. She wanted to pay tribute to the lives lost and the devastation which remained in their absence, by creating a piece of music which begins in darkness; desolate and claustrophobic, whilst still leaving the audience feeling uplifted and thoughtful in the final bars.The significance and musical appreciation for the creation of In Pitch Black was formally recognised by BASCA in 2011, when Lucy Pankhurst won the internationally acclaimed British Composer Award (the first time a brass band work had received the award, and the first time a female composer had won the category).Full programme notes are included in the product images.Look and Listen (performance courtesy of Manchester University Brass Band):

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £24.95

    Wheal Breage - Terry Reed

    The Cornish word Wheal strictly means "a place of work" but it is usually thought of as meaning a mine, because all Cornish mine names were prefixed by the word Wheal. The composer is the MD of Breage & District Silver Band and this march is dedicated to both his band, based in the village of Breage, Cornwall, and to the great Cornish mining heritage. Breage Parish had a number of successful tin and copper ore mines, some of which started in the 16th and 17th centuries and lasted until the end of the 19th century. Cornish Brass Bands and Male Voice Choirs were formed by the miners and have had a long association with the mining communities around Cornwall.Wheal Breage starts off in a jolly way to reflect the mining youth's carefree life outside of mining. At Section C, the march modulates to a minor key, reflecting the hard, industrious nature of mining; you can almost hear the Beam Engine Houses pumping the water out of the mines. At Section D, there is a dramatic time signature change from 6/8 to 4/4, followed in the Trio at Section E, by an original melody which was written to reflect and remember the men (and children) who tragically lost their lives in many mining accidents that occurred over a number of centuries. Section F is a joyful coda, reflecting the past Cornish Miners' Gala Parades which were headed by a Cornish Brass Band.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £44.00

    The Gael from Last of the Mohicans - Trevor Jones - Andrew Duncan

    Who can forget the epic 1992 movie, The Last of the Mohicans, starring Daniel Day Lewis. The soundtrack was written by Trevor Jones and Randy Edelman with both men on record as saying this soundtrack is one of their greatest pieces of work to date. This scintillating and powerful arrangement of the main theme, The Gael, is one not to be missed and is guaranteed to 'bring the house down' at every performance. A work that no band would want to be without!

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £35.00

    Legends of Cyfarthfa - Matthew Hall

    Legends of CyfarthfaCombining the music of Joseph Parry and the legendary Cyfarthfa Band, Legends of Cyfarthfa is a technically challenging but musically rewarding concert work. Robert Crawshay owned the Cyfarthfa Ironworks in South Wales creating a business empire second to none.Cyfarthfa Castle was built by Crawshay as the family home from the income made via the ironworks. He wanted his own private band to play under the name of the ironworks with the best players in the world, playing on the highest quality instruments at the time. Employing the band members under the guise of iron workers, the Cyfarthfa Band was made up of virtuoso players, performing for the pleasure of the Crawshay dynasty.This virtuosity can be heard in some of the more technically challenging sections of Legends of Cyfarthfa. Joseph Parry was born in Cyfarthfa.He composed the first piece of music specifically written for brass band called Tydfil Overture for the Cyfarthfa Band, alongside many other memorable works for other instrumentation.Legends of Cyfarthfa incorporates many of Parry’s works including his opera Blodwen, hymn tune Aberystwyth, folk melody Myfanwy and the Tydfil Overture, alongside many other melodies from Wales. Sospanfach, Men of Harlech, Lisa Lan and Calon Lan are just a number of the melodies that are used in this composition.The premiere performance was given by Tredegar Town Band under the direction of Ian Porthouse at the 2010 Brass in Concert Championships where it was awarded the Cyril Beere Memorial Trophy for Best New Composition or Arrangement.https://matthew-hall.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/05-Legends-Of-Cyfarthfa.mp3Legends of Cyfarthfa

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £25.00 £25.00
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    Arrival Of The Magi - Jeremy Cladd - Len Jenkins

    "Arrival of the Magi" is a new piece derived from a larger work composed by Jeremy (Jez) Cladd who is an old friend of ours and who was Head Chorister during his teenage years at Peterborough Cathedral. After Jesus was born, the Bible describes how three Wise Men (Magi) came to look for Him, probably from an area which now comprises Iraq, Iran, Saudi Arabia and the Yemen. Legends have since developed around them and given them the names of Caspar (King of Sheba ??" who brought Frankincense), Melchior (King of Arabia ??" who brought Gold) and Balthazar (King of Tarse and Egypt - who brought Myrrh). Their gifts foretell in allegory the life (and death) of the Christ. The music depicts their journey across the desert following the natal star to the village of Bethlehem where they find the child, and finishes with the calm as they approach the crib.