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  • £142.99

    Time Machine - Thomas Doss

    Time Machine is a journey through time that begins in the Stone Age. Evolution and the coming of man take place. The journey takes us into the present, in which disorientation and chaos abound. We travel further into the future. An unfamiliar, quiet and surreal landscape lies before us and we wander through it, bewildered as we become aware of the destruction of the environment. Suddenly, and for no reason, memories from our childhood are awoken. Cultures have become completely mixed into one and the evolution of man has run its course. We realise that there is no "afterwards" as before us lies the Stone Age once again... The wheel of time spins blindly on and all isrepeated.

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days

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  • £142.99

    Time Machine (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

    Time Machine is a journey through time that begins in the Stone Age. Evolution and the coming of man take place. The journey takes us into the present, in which disorientation and chaos abound. We travel further into the future. An unfamiliar, quiet and surreal landscape lies before us and we wander through it, bewildered as we become aware of the destruction of the environment. Suddenly, and for no reason, memories from our childhood are awoken. Cultures have become completely mixed into one and the evolution of man has run its course. We realise that there is no "afterwards" as before us lies the Stone Age once again... The wheel of time spins blindly on and all is repeated. 13:28

    Estimated delivery 10-14 working days

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  • £34.95

    A Slow Ride in a Static Machine - Phil Lawrence

    A Slow Ride in a Static Machine was inspired some time ago when my (late) Father came to visit me "down in London" as he put it. It was based not on one of his circular mishaps, but on several! He was always directed carefully, but refused to carry a map in the car! At one time when I lived in North London I would meet him outside the capital, and he would then follow be back to my place, but after I moved to East London I made him bite the navigational bullet and transverse the 'M25 Orbital'. His main problem seemed to be getting off this mesmerising circular cark park. He would often phone (in a weary tone) from the Dartford Tunnel (which is 5 junctions past the one he needed to get off at), asking me to, "bring him in" so to speak. I would always refuse. And then, he would do the opposite (especially when travelling at night), he would phone me up from near Cambridge (he'd gone the wrong way up the M11 away from London by 45 miles), and would ask where he was!The title is obviously a play on John Adams' composition, A Short Ride In A Fast Machine. This quirky tone poem starts as a wind-up by using those unwanted intervals of augmented 4th's and minor 9th's & 7th's in the main tune, before hearing the road works, the juggernauts multi horns, fender-benders, ambulance and police sirens! This then all works to a back beat on kit. The wind-up start gets to an almost Go-Go 1960's Disco middle section (the nostalgic hay-days of the open road), where our wind-up tune falls into place and we all relax as we can now drive at 42.1 mph! We DC, and then get into a right car mess in the Coda! Phil Lawrence.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £34.95

    SLOW RIDE IN A STATIC MACHINE, A (Brass Band) - Lawrence, Phil

    A Slow Ride in a Static Machine was inspired some time ago when my (late) Father came to visit me "down in London" as he put it. It was based not on one of his circular mishaps, but on several! He was always directed carefully, but refused to carry a map in the car! At one time when I lived in North London I would meet him outside the capital, and he would then follow be back to my place, but after I moved to East London I made him bite the navigational bullet and transverse the 'M25 Orbital'. His main problem seemed to be getting off this mesmerising circular cark park. He would often phone (in a weary tone) from the Dartford Tunnel (which is 5 junctions past the one he needed to get off at), asking me to, "bring him in" so to speak. I would always refuse. And then, he would do the opposite (especially when travelling at night), he would phone me up from near Cambridge (he'd gone the wrong way up the M11 away from London by 45 miles), and would ask where he was!The title is obviously a play on John Adams' composition, A Short Ride In A Fast Machine. This quirky tone poem starts as a wind-up by using those unwanted intervals of augmented 4th's and minor 9th's & 7th's in the main tune, before hearing the road works, the juggernauts multi horns, fender-benders, ambulance and police sirens! This then all works to a back beat on kit. The wind-up start gets to an almost Go-Go 1960's Disco middle section (the nostalgic hay-days of the open road), where our wind-up tune falls into place and we all relax as we can now drive at 42.1 mph! We DC, and then get into a right car mess in the Coda!Phil Lawrence.Duration:4:00

    Estimated delivery 10-14 working days
  • £35.00

    A Short Ride in a Brass Machine

    A Short Ride in a Brass Machine was written in 2006 to mark the 140th anniversary of the Brighouse and Rastrick Band and first performed in the Central Methodist Church in Brighouse by Brighouse and Rastrick conducted by James Gourlay. The title refers to the orchestral composition A Short Ride in A Fast Machine by the American composer John Adams which provided some of the inspiration for the work. The music is a simple celebratory prelude consisting of two main ideas, an expansive melody full of open fifths (giving the music a slightly "American" feel) and a short fanfare figure. After these are both heard for the first time a brief development of the fanfare material leads to a broader, warm harmonisation of the opening melody and the pulse relaxes a little before tension builds to a reiteration of the fanfare and a final triumphant version of the opening theme.You can see a sample PDF file of the score here.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days

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  • £69.95

    IN LEAGUE WITH EXTRAORDINARY GENTLEMEN (Concerto for Euphonium) - Peter Graham

    In League with Extraordinary Gentlemen combines two of composer Peter Graham's life interests - composition and 19th century popular fiction. Each of the concertos three movements takes its musical inspiration from extraordinary characters who have transcended the original genre and have subsequently found mass audiences through film, television and comic book adaptations. The first movement follows a traditional sonata form outline with one slight modification. The order of themes in the recapitulation is reversed, mirroring a plot climax in the H.G. Wells novella The Time Machine (where the protagonist, known only as The Time Traveller, puts his machine into reverse bringing the story back full circle). The Adventure of the Final Problem is the title of a short story published in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle. This is an account of the great detectives final struggle with his long-time adversary Professor Moriarty at the Reichenbach Falls in Switzerland. The music takes the form of a slowed down lndler (a Swiss/Austrian folk dance) and various acoustic and electronic echo effects call to mind the alpine landscape. The final bars pose a question paralleling that of Conan Doyle in the story have we really seen the last of Sherlock Holmes?The final movement, The Great Race, (available separately) follows Phileas Fogg on the last stage of his epic journey Around the World in Eighty Days (from the novel by Jules Verne). The moto perpetuo nature of the music gives full rein to the soloists technical virtuosity. As the work draws to a conclusion, the frantic scramble by Fogg to meet his deadline at the Reform Club in Pall Mall, London, is echoed by the soloists increasingly demanding ascending figuration, set against the background of Big Ben clock chimes.In League with Extraordinary Gentlemen was first performed in the brass band version by David Thornton and the Black Dyke Band, conductor Nicholas Childs, at the RNCM Concert Hall Manchester on January 30, 2009. Available MultiMedia Files

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days

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  • £69.95

    In League with Extraordinary Gentlemen (Euphonium Solo with Brass Band) - Graham, Peter

    Concerto for EuphoniumIn League with Extraordinary Gentlemen combines two of composer Peter Graham's life interests - composition and 19th century popular fiction. Each of the concerto’s three movements takes its musical inspiration from extraordinary characters who have transcended the original genre and have subsequently found mass audiences through film, television and comic book adaptations.The first movement follows a traditional sonata form outline with one slight modification. The order of themes in the recapitulation is reversed, mirroring a plot climax in the H.G. Wells novella The Time Machine (where the protagonist, known only as The Time Traveller, puts his machine into reverse bringing the story back full circle).The Adventure of the Final Problem is the title of a short story published in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle. This is an account of the great detective’s final struggle with his long-time adversary Professor Moriarty at the Reichenbach Falls in Switzerland. The music takes the form of a slowed down l?ndler (a Swiss/Austrian folk dance) and various acoustic and electronic echo effects call to mind the alpine landscape. The final bars pose a question paralleling that of Conan Doyle in the story – have we really seen the last of Sherlock Holmes?The final movement, The Great Race, (available separately) follows Phileas Fogg on the last stage of his epic journey “Around the World in Eighty Days” (from the novel by Jules Verne). The moto perpetuo nature of the music gives full rein to the soloist’s technical virtuosity. As the work draws to a conclusion, the frantic scramble by Fogg to meet his deadline at the Reform Club in Pall Mall, London, is echoed by the soloist’s increasingly demanding ascending figuration, set against the background of Big Ben clock chimes.In League with Extraordinary Gentlemen was first performed in the brass band version by David Thornton and the Black Dyke Band, conductor Nicholas Childs, at the RNCM Concert Hall Manchester on January 30, 2009.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 working days

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  • £69.95

    In League with Extraordinary Gentlemen (Euphonium Solo with Brass Band) - Graham, PeterCode:

    Concerto for EuphoniumIn League with Extraordinary Gentlemen combines two of composer Peter Graham's life interests - composition and 19th century popular fiction. Each of the concerto’s three movements takes its musical inspiration from extraordinary characters who have transcended the original genre and have subsequently found mass audiences through film, television and comic book adaptations.The first movement follows a traditional sonata form outline with one slight modification. The order of themes in the recapitulation is reversed, mirroring a plot climax in the H.G. Wells novella The Time Machine (where the protagonist, known only as The Time Traveller, puts his machine into reverse bringing the story back full circle).The Adventure of the Final Problem is the title of a short story published in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle. This is an account of the great detective’s final struggle with his long-time adversary Professor Moriarty at the Reichenbach Falls in Switzerland. The music takes the form of a slowed down l?ndler (a Swiss/Austrian folk dance) and various acoustic and electronic echo effects call to mind the alpine landscape. The final bars pose a question paralleling that of Conan Doyle in the story – have we really seen the last of Sherlock Holmes?The final movement, The Great Race, (available separately) follows Phileas Fogg on the last stage of his epic journey “Around the World in Eighty Days” (from the novel by Jules Verne). The moto perpetuo nature of the music gives full rein to the soloist’s technical virtuosity. As the work draws to a conclusion, the frantic scramble by Fogg to meet his deadline at the Reform Club in Pall Mall, London, is echoed by the soloist’s increasingly demanding ascending figuration, set against the background of Big Ben clock chimes.In League with Extraordinary Gentlemen was first performed in the brass band version by David Thornton and the Black Dyke Band, conductor Nicholas Childs, at the RNCM Concert Hall Manchester on January 30, 2009.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 working days
  • £50.00

    Things to Come - Phillip Littlemore

    The 1936 science fiction film Things to Come was written by H G Wells and starred Raymond Massey and Ralph Richardson. It was based on the author’s 1933 novel The Shape of Things To Come , an elaborate prophecy of world war, disease, dictatorship and, finally, a utopia. It was Wells himself that approached Bliss to write the music for the film, although Bliss had no experience of writing for this medium. Wells believed that the music was integral and not to be added later, and so several sections of the score were completed before shooting and some of it was used intact. Whether the producer, Alexander Korda, had agreed to this is unclear but, inevitably, some of the music was edited under the watchful eye of Muir Mathieson, who was involved in the project as music director and also working on his first major film. Some six months before the release of the film Bliss created an extensive Suite for the BBC, and conducted two-thirds of the special recording sessions himself. Some of the original manuscripts and material from those sessions subsequently disappeared and are now lost. The later concert suite, from 1940 and dedicated to H G Wells, includes six movements of which four have been arranged in this brass band transcription. Sir Arthur Bliss (1891–1975) Bliss was one of the most important figures in British musical life from the early 1920s through to his later years when he was Master of the Queen’s Music. He wrote over 140 works for every combination of voice and instrument including large scale orchestral works, operas, ballets, film scores, chamber works, songs and music for brass band. He was composing right up to his death at the age of 83. H G Wells (1866–1946) Wells was a writer of science-fiction which also explored social topics of class conflict to evolution. He became a literary sensation almost overnight when his first novel, The Time Machine , was published in 1895. This was followed in quick succession by The Island of Doctor Moreau , The Invisible Man and The War of the Worlds . As an internationally recognised author he travelled extensively gaining notoriety for his radical social and political views. Today he is often referred to as the ‘Father of Science Fiction’. ? Item Code: TPBB-070 Duration: 10’55” Grade: 2nd Section and above ?

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £60.00

    Royal Fireworks, Music from the (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Handel, George Frideric - Blakeson, Don

    Handel's Music For The Royal Fireworks was composed in 1749 to celebrate the signing of the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle and the end of the War of the Austrian Succession. The site chosen was the fashionable upper part of St. James Park, which was becoming known at that time as Green Park. The Green Park 'Machine', which housed the pyrotechnics was an elaborate affair adorned with "statues and other figures, festoons of flowers, and other lustres". It was announced that there would be some 10,000 rockets and other devices to be let off, all culminating in a grand, burning sun with 'Vivat Rex' at its centre. There were also rumours that the event was to be accompanied by an impressively large band of military music and mention was made of "40 trumpets, 20 french horns, 16 hautboys (oboes), 16 bassoons, 8 pairs of kettle drums, 12 side drums, a proper number of flutes and fifes; with 100 cannon to go off singly at intervals". It is unlikely that Handel had ever conceived such forces and it was merely the promoter's hyberbole, not least because it was unlikely that there were sufficient numbers of extra military musicians available that could read music, as most played from memory. It is also likely that Handel, and his publisher, were conscious that future performances would be hindered by such forces. The autographed score lists the instrumentation as 9 trumpets, 9 french horns, 24 hautboys, 12 bassoons, 3 pairs of kettle drums and up to 4 side drums. The work is in five movements, although Handel's original score did not indicate in which order they should be played. However, in this score they are arranged to be played as follows: Overture; Bouree; La Paix; Minuets; La Rejouissance. Duration: 19:00

    Estimated delivery 10-14 working days

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