Searching for Wind Band Music? Visit the Wind Band Music Shop
We've found 26 matches for your search

Results

  • £38.00

    Hymn at Sunrise (Score only) - Ray Steadman-Allen

    The idea for this work was prompted by a poem - Hymn Before Sunrise - which describes the majesty of a mountain in darkness, the sounds of a nearby waterfall and so on. Nothing came of the exposure to these pictures except for general thoughts about the dawn of day and a series of movements expressing a personal response to the wonder of creation in an imaginary moment in time. The movement titles, which were added later, are intended to underline a prevailing sense of worship, wonder and exaltation. The music is pure, not pictoral, though listeners may conjure their own images. An actual hymn - Tallis' Cannon - is incorporated. There are five movements: 1. Thanksgiving: A short prelude in two parts. First a brief passage of 'dawn music' before things become more vigorous: fanfare-like music ushers in the trombone section's presentation of the Tallis tune. A broad band version concludes the movement. 2. De Profundis: A slow movement shot through with anxious questionings featuring flugel and trombone. The mood lightens a little in the centre where the soprano cornet is featured and the movement ends serenely. 3. Celebration is characterised by rhythmic drive, this is buoyant with plenty of incident pointed up by the percussion. 4. Invocation: Melodic in nature and sober in mood, the first section is a series of short solos mingled with chorale-like statements. Central to the movement is a chorale-prelude style presentation of the Tallis tune. The third section reintroduces the earlier solo music by the full ensemble. Dissolving, the music enters the last movement without a break. 5. Paean: Marked allegro con spirito there is, quite rightly, a fair amount of fun in the rejoicing. Snatches of Tallis are heard, then comes a gentle passage with a cornet solo leading to fanfare music and recapitulation. Two recitatives are succeeded by a coda which brings the work to a sonorous and exultant conclusion.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £48.00

    Hymn at Sunrise (Parts only) - Ray Steadman-Allen

    The idea for this work was prompted by a poem - Hymn Before Sunrise - which describes the majesty of a mountain in darkness, the sounds of a nearby waterfall and so on. Nothing came of the exposure to these pictures except for general thoughts about the dawn of day and a series of movements expressing a personal response to the wonder of creation in an imaginary moment in time. The movement titles, which were added later, are intended to underline a prevailing sense of worship, wonder and exaltation. The music is pure, not pictoral, though listeners may conjure their own images. An actual hymn - Tallis' Cannon - is incorporated. There are five movements: 1. Thanksgiving: A short prelude in two parts. First a brief passage of 'dawn music' before things become more vigorous: fanfare-like music ushers in the trombone section's presentation of the Tallis tune. A broad band version concludes the movement. 2. De Profundis: A slow movement shot through with anxious questionings featuring flugel and trombone. The mood lightens a little in the centre where the soprano cornet is featured and the movement ends serenely. 3. Celebration is characterised by rhythmic drive, this is buoyant with plenty of incident pointed up by the percussion. 4. Invocation: Melodic in nature and sober in mood, the first section is a series of short solos mingled with chorale-like statements. Central to the movement is a chorale-prelude style presentation of the Tallis tune. The third section reintroduces the earlier solo music by the full ensemble. Dissolving, the music enters the last movement without a break. 5. Paean: Marked allegro con spirito there is, quite rightly, a fair amount of fun in the rejoicing. Snatches of Tallis are heard, then comes a gentle passage with a cornet solo leading to fanfare music and recapitulation. Two recitatives are succeeded by a coda which brings the work to a sonorous and exultant conclusion.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £90.00

    Cambridgeshire Impressions - Rieks van der Velde

    In a four-part composition Rieks van der Velde takes us to the richly varied area surrounding the university city of Cambridge. The Dutch composer was especially inspired by the atmosphere of Cambridgeshire, the county which lies north of London. 1. The Journey. Although on arrival the area looks peaceful and friendly, the ruggedness of its inhabitants and landscape have an unmistakable influence on the music. In the course of the tour, which starts with an Allegro movement, we are shown the vitality, energy and freshness of the Cambridgeshire countryside. Short themes, swift and sudden motifs and rhythmical patterns supported by the drive of percussion instruments give expression to this image. The first part is concluded by two Calmo movements in which the music expresses how the cathedral in the city of Ely comes into sight and is gradually approached. 2. Visit to Ely Cathedral. The famous Norman cathedral church of Ely, which was built in 1109, has attracted tourists from all over the world apart from being a place of worship and heritage site. A cornet solo introduces the contemplative mood of the composition at this point. The mystical atmosphere of the cathedral runs through this lyrical part like a continuous thread. 3. The Pub. The thirst caused by this intensive journey makes a visit to the local pub a definite must. These "public houses", which may be open until the early hours of the morning, offer all kinds of entertainment. Drinks are served liberally and the atmosphere is lively. 4. The Journey Back. Time has flown: In other words, the moment of departure has come sooner than one would have wished. In a flashback which recaptures elements of the first part of the composition we say goodbye to Cambridgeshire in a fitting manner. Two scintillating final measures bring us abruptly back to the present.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

     PDF View Music

  • £38.00

    SYMPHONY No.2, Finale from (Brass Band) - Mahler, Gustav - Harper, Philip

    One of the most life-affirming pieces of music ever composed, Mahler's 2nd Symphony, subtitled "The Resurrection", was first performed in Berlin in 1895. Mahlers interest in the mysteries of the afterlife is well-known and is a recurring theme throughout all his nine symphonies. Philip Harper has arranged the final passages of the 2nd Symphony, which begins with a profound hymn set to the words of Friedrich Klopstock??" Rise again, yea, thou shalt rise again. The music contains one of Mahler's magical transitionary passages, building in intensity, before the hymn is restated in all its majesty at the moment of glorious resurrection. This arrangement was performed as the finale to Cory Band's winning Brass in Concert programme in 2012. The publisher of this works suggests that it should be playable by 1st. section bands upwards.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £38.00

    Finale from Symphony No. 2 (The Resurrection) - Mahler, G - Harper, P

    One of the most life-affirming pieces of music ever composed, Mahler’s 2nd Symphony, subtitled ‘The Resurrection’, was first performed in Berlin in 1895. Mahler’s interest in the mysteries of the afterlife is well-known and is a recurring theme throughout all his nine symphonies. Philip Harper has arranged the final passages of the 2nd Symphony, which begins with a profound hymn set to the words of Friedrich Klopstock— ‘Rise again, yea, thou shalt rise again’.  The music contains one of Mahler’s magical transitionary passages, building in intensity, before the hymn is restated in all its majesty at the moment of glorious resurrection. This arrangement was performed as the finale to Cory Band’s winning Brass in Concert programme in 2012.Listen to Cory BandCourtesy of World of Brass

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

     PDF View Music

  • £19.50

    Song Without Words - Max Stannard

    This sublimely simple piece is the perfect choice of solo for bands looking to add a special moment to their concerts. With parts not too demanding, this solo would suit up and coming cornet players that would like the chance to fulfil their moment in the spotlight. The gentle ballad flow of the work would work well at any concert occasion and is open to youth bands as well as more seasoned senior bands.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

     PDF View Music

  • £19.50

    Using Your Mobile - Various - Stephen Tighe

    Its happened to most bands, in the middle of a quiet moment in the music, an audience member's mobile phone rings (or worse, a band members!!!). Now, all can be forgiven in the fantastic "tongue-in-cheek" piece of music. Based around the music of Johann Strauss, this lively arrangement pokes fun at the Grand Waltz (Nokia's preferred ring tone!), as well as some of the other often heard ring tones (William Tell etc). Fantastic entertainment value, working well in just about any concert.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

     PDF View Music

  • £25.00

    Cantus (on E.D.) - Peter Meechan

    From Leanne Stamp:"As musicians,I think we really identify ourselves and our existence on being musicians. And we collect these teachings and bondsalong our path. But whendoes it happen? When does that moment happen that someone becomes an integral part of the fabric that makes you who you are? Or when can you pinpointthe momentthat you realize that a person was essential in your path? I don’t think we know. And all too many times it isn’t until someone is gone that we truly reflect and try to figure it out.When Ed De'Ath joined our band (Las Vegas Brass Band) he hadn’t played in over 20 years. He heard the brass band and decided he wanted to go back to playing, and within a few weeks became a member of LVBB.He had grown up playing in Canada, where his father was a brass musician too, and Ed was quite an accomplished young euphonium player competing in competitions and playing in Salvation Army bands.But life happened and it lead him away from playing.Even though I was in LVBB a few years before Edjoined, he quickly became an essential part of what makes that group a family. I spent the better part of a decade playing in the same section as him and then about 5 years sitting next to him on either side.Ed always took a sincere interest in myplaying. Praising the good and giving constructive criticism for improvement. For about two years almost every otherSaturdaywasspent playing duets at his house.I left to study at the RNCM in Manchester, UK, before returning to Las Vegas.My first rehearsal back from the RNCM Ed looked at me said, “here you go kiddo, you’ve earned this solo seat”.There was no ego. Only the wish for me to reach my potential. It was always so apparent with Ed the love he shared for the younger musicians and his desire for them to succeed.Ed lit up the room with his enthusiasm and love for music – he just truly loved being there. That special quality that makes a band a family...he knew and treasured that.And although Ed wasn’t my teacher per say, he was an integral part of my fabric.The way Ed left was sudden. He had been fighting bladder cancer in and off for quite a while but things were looking up. Tests were clear. And then a very aggressive pancreatic cancer stole him very quickly, almost without warning.And I will never forget how I felt getting that call. We decided to have rehearsal that night. And for one reason. Because Ed would’ve wanted us to.I will always be grateful to Ed. Grateful that I got tolearn things from him, receive advice, enjoy his company, and feel his love – part of him is with me whenever I play."

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £74.95

    Harrison's Dream - Peter Graham

    At 8.00pm on the 22nd of October 1707, the Association, flagship of the Royal Navy, struck rocks off the Scilly Isles with the loss of the entire crew. Throughout the rest of the evening the remaining three ships in the fleet suffered the same fate. Only 26 of the original 1,647 crew members survived. This disaster was a direct result of an inability to calculate longitude, the most pressing scientific problem of the time. It pushed the longitude question to the forefront of the national consciousness and precipitated the Longitude Act. Parliament funded a prize of ?20,000 to anyone whose method or device would solve the dilemma. For carpenter and self-taught clockmaker John Harrison, this was the beginning of a 40 year obsession. To calculate longitude it is necessary to know the time aboard ship and at the home port or place of known longitude, at precisely the same moment. Harrison's dream was to build a clock so accurate that this calculation could be made, an audacious feat of engineering. This work reflects on aspects of this epic tale, brilliantly brought to life in Dava Sobel's book Longitude. Much of the music is mechanistic in tone and is constructed along precise mathematical and metrical lines. The heart of the work however is human - the attraction of the ?20,000 prize is often cited as Harrison's motivation. However, the realisation that countless lives depended on a solution was one which haunted Harrison. The emotional core of the music reflects on this, and in particular the evening of 22ndOctober 1707. Peter GrahamCheshireJuly 2000

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

     PDF View Music

  • £27.00

    Auld Lang Syne (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Wilkinson, Keith M.

    It is a tradition in most English-speaking countries to sing this song at the stroke of midnight on New Year's Eve to usher in the New Year. The words are at least partially written by Robert Burns and the words "Auld Lang Syne" literally mean "old long ago" or "the good old days", providing a moment of reflection before moving forwards into the New Year.The tubular bells, although pitched, sound midnight when they enter at bar 10.This arrangement was prepared for Brass Band of the Western Reserve, musical director Keith M Wilkinson, to perform at First Night, Akron, Ohio, December 31st, 2007. The following choreography is suggested:Commence the performance with all the cornets scattered around the auditorium.At the end of bar 18 invite the audience to sing along with the band.At bar 27 the cornets move to stand in front of the other members of the band to lead to the stirring conclusion. Should auld acquaintance be forgot and never brought to mind?Should auld acquaintance be forgot and days of auld lang syne?For auld lang syne, my dear, for auld lang syne,We'll take a cup of kindness yet, for auld lang syne.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

     PDF View Music