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  • £10.00

    The Once and Future King

    DescriptionThe Once and Future King is a suite of three movements; each movement was inspired by an Arthurian legend. The first movement, 'Tintagel', concerns the famous Cornish promontory said to be the birthplace of King Arthur. In Arthur's time, Tintagel was part of the court of King Mark of Cornwall and the music imagines a visit by the King of the Britons to his Cornish neighbour and the place of his birth, reflecting the ceremony and drama of such an occasion; the music is strongly antiphonal, contrasting the more strident fanfares of the cornets and trombones with the warmth of the saxhorns and tubas.The second movement, 'Lyonesse', takes its inspiration from the mythical land which once joined Cornwall to the Isles of Scilly. One legend claims that after the disastrous battle of Camlan where Arthur and Mordred were both killed, the remnants of Arthur's army were pursued across Lyonesse to Scilly, whereupon Merlin cast a spell to sink Lyonesse behind them and drown the pursuers. Some say the bells of the 140 churches inundated that day can still be heard ringing. All the material in this movement derives from two short motifs heard in counterpoint at the very beginning, which are intentionally dissonant and bitonal in character.The final movement, 'Badon Hill', takes its title from the legendary site of Arthur's last battle with the Saxons and is a lively toccata based on the medieval secular song L'Homme Armee ('The Armed Man'). The music uses a number of medieval devices including "hocketing" (passing melody from one voice to another). The actual site of Badon Hill is unknown but it has been associated with Badbury Rings in Dorset and a lot of evidence now points towards the town of Bath. Arthur's victory at Badon Hill was the last great victory for Celtic Britain over the Saxon invaders, but in the end only set the conquest back by a few decades. Arthur himself was dead by then, betrayed and defeated by his nephew Mordred, but it is said that Arthur only sleeps and will return in a time of dire need - hence the legend that Arthur's dying words were: Bury me in Britain, for I am the Once and Future King.Performance NotesWhere space and practicality permits the opening movement should be played with cornets and trombones standing behind the band facing the audience; they should retake their seats for the second and third movements.PercussionConcert Bass Drum (ideally NOT Kit/Pedal Bass Drum), Suspended Cymbal, pair of Clash Cymbals, Glockenspiel, Snare Drum, Tambourine, 2 x Timpani (Eb-G, Bb-D), 2 x Tom-toms, Triangle, Tam-Tam* (only if available), Tubular Bells *(only if available).MutesBaritones, all cornets and trombones will require metal straight mutes; all trombones and cornets will require cup mutes.*The Once and Future King was set as the test-piece for the 3rd section of the Swiss National Championships in 2007. The score was then slightly revised in July 2008, the main alteration being the exclusion of the tubular bells part for the Regional Championships of Great Britain in 2009. Some parts which were optional (or cued on other instruments) at the request of the Swiss Brass Band Association were restored to their original octaves and instruments. In 2015 the tubular bells part was restored in the optional Percussion 3 part; all parts in Percussion 3 are optional, although some are cued in the percussion 1 & 2 parts (and the cues should be played if only two players are available).Listen to a preview and follow along with the score below!

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £29.50

    Once Upon A Christmas Song - Peter Kay & Gary Barlow - Gavin Somerset

    They just don't write Christmas songs like they used to! Enter, Geraldine McQueen (AKA Peter Kay) who set to put all that right with her (his!) spoof Christmas song, 'Once Upon A Christmas Song', co-written by Gary Barlow. The proceeds from the single were donated to the NSPCC and at its peak, reached number 5 in the UK charts. The song's memorable video and hook which tells of them singing Christmas songs 'Over & Over & Over again' made the melody an instant hit. Now your band can inject some humour into your festive concerts with this great little number. Is there a hidden Geraldine in your band?!

    In stock: Estimated dispatch 1-3 days

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  • £29.50

    The Essence of Brass - Gavin Somerset

    Two years after the inaugural BrassFestUK event comes the anthem for 2019, 'The Essence of Brass'. Composer Gavin Somerset has revisited many of the ideas contained within the very popular work written for the inaugural BrassFestUK, The Spirit of Brass two years ago, to deliver once again, an uplifting original work for Brass Bands that will keep both players and audiences entertained. The piece opens with the work's heroic theme which has a genuine feel-good factor throughout, making this year's anthem a sure hit with all bands once again. NB. A Youth Band version is also available which works as a standalone item or alongside the senior band edition.

    In stock: Estimated dispatch 1-3 days

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  • £29.50

    The Essence of Brass (Youth Band) - Gavin Somerset

    Two years after the inaugural BrassFestUK event comes the anthem for 2019, 'The Essence of Brass'. Composer Gavin Somerset has revisited many of the ideas contained within the very popular work written for the inaugural BrassFestUK, The Spirit of Brass two years ago, to deliver once again, an uplifting original work for Brass Bands that will keep both players and audiences entertained. The piece opens with the work's heroic theme which has a genuine feel-good factor throughout, making this year's anthem a sure hit with all bands once again. NB. This Youth Band edition also works alongside the original senior band version.

    In stock: Estimated dispatch 1-3 days

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  • £119.99

    The Lonesome Knight - Saskia Apon

    The composition the Lonesome Knight was based on a fairytale. The piece was written by Saskia Apon for the National Brass Band Championships 2001. Once upon a time there was a knight who went to fight and defeat the dragon that had beenkilling the people of his town. There is a short but intense battle between the two and the knight is triumphant. However whilst persuing the dragon the knight has travelled far away from his home and now is lost. He roames around trying to findhis way home, but exhausted and weary he falls to the ground. He awakens startled by a Giant and a group of Goblins who are celebrating the death of the dragon. The knight joins in the festivities but after a long evening is once more leftalone. The sun rises the following morning and he sees a castle on the horizon. He enthousiastcally ventures towards the castle in the hope of meeting other people. However he becomes greatly disillusioned when there is none to be found. Inhis desperation the knight climbs the tower ready to jump off. Suddenly he hears a heavenly voice. Right before him is the most beautiful princess he has ever seen. She graciously thanks him for killing the dragon, a spark ingnites between themand they build a life together and.... live happily ever after! Saskia Apon studied harp at Rotterdam School of music. With this instrument she rounded of her studies by passing with credit, however it was her love of composition thatremained her focus. Self-taught, she began composing at the age of nine. Since then she has written pieces for The Dutch Brass Quintet, The Dutch Brass Ensemble, The Rotterdam Trombone Quartet and the brass band quintet Brass Ability. Atpresent she is the in-house arranger for The Rotterdam Philarmonic Brass Ensemble. Besides the customary attention for the real splashworks she endeavours to add value to the melodic function of the brass wind instruments in her music. Hercompositions and arrangements can be found on many diverse Cds.The composition the Lonesome Knight was based on a fairytale. The piece was written by Saskia Apon for the National Brass Band Championships 2001. Once upon a time there was aknight who went to fight and defeat the dragon that had been killing the people of his town. There is a short but intense battle between the two and the knight is triumphant. However whilst persuing the dragon the knight has travelled far awayfrom his home and now is lost. He roames around trying to find his way home, but exhausted and weary he falls to the ground. He awakens startled by a Giant and a group of Goblins who are celebrating the death of the dragon. The knight joins inthe festivities but after a long evening is once more left alone. The sun rises the following morning and he sees a castle on the horizon. He enthousiastcally ventures towards the castle in the hope of meeting other people. However he becomesgreatly disillusioned when there is none to be found. In his desperation the knight climbs the tower ready to jump off. Suddenly he hears a heavenly voice. Right before him is the most beautiful princess he has ever seen. She graciously thankshim for killing the dragon, a spark ingnites between them and they build a life together and.... live happily ever after! Saskia Apon studied harp at Rotterdam School of music. With this instrument she rounded of her studies by passing withcredit, however it was her love of composition that remained her focus. Self-taught, she began composing at the age of nine. Since then she has written pieces for The Dutch Brass Quintet, The Dutch Brass Ensemble, The Rotterdam Trombone Quartetand the brass band quintet Brass Ability. At present she is the in-house arranger for The Rotterdam Philarmonic Brass Ensemble. Besides the customary attention for the real splashworks she endeavours to add value to the melodic functionof the brass wind instruments in her music. Her compositions and arrangements can be found on many diverse Cds.

    Estimated dispatch 5-14 working days

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  • £36.29

    Call of the Victor (Brass Band) Marcus Venables

    VIEW SCORE PDF The music within this piece by Canadian composer Marcus Venables portrays the image of a victorious and triumphant call - the battle's won and the victor proclaims supreme authority. As with any ruling authority and power, the growing opposition rise to conquer. After the opening fanfare and a call of victory, the music portrays the lavishness of victory with this driving sense of impending conflict. Once again, the victor must go to war and battle the threats. The music continues to express the sorrow and the loss that comes with being the victor. With sacrifice and pain, the victor now grows in passion and motivation to once again conquer the enemies. With a final swift battle, the victor calls out to claim supremacy once again. PDF download includes score and full set of parts. Sheet music available from: UK - www.brassband.co.uk USA - www.solidbrassmusic.com Difficulty Level: Second Section + Instrumentation: Soprano Cornet Eb Solo Cornet Bb Repiano Cornet Bb 2nd Cornet Bb 3rd Cornet Bb Flugel Horn Bb Solo Horn Eb 1st Horn Eb 2nd Horn Eb 1st Baritone Bb 2nd Baritone Bb 1st Trombone Bb 2nd Trombone Bb Bass Trombone Euphonium Bb Bass Eb Bass Bb Timpani Percussion 1-3

    In stock: Estimated dispatch 1-3 days

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  • £79.95

    The Lost Village of Imber (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Bond, Christopher

    The Lost Village of Imber was commissioned by Bratton Silver Band in 2019 in celebration of 160 years of the band; 1859-2019. Structured in three movements, the complete work was premiered by Cory Band at Wiltshire Music Centre in February 2020.The village of Imber on Salisbury Plain had been inhabited for over one thousand years when it was evacuated in 1943 to make way for military training in the Second World War. At the time, with preparations for the Allied invasion of Europe underway, most villagers put up no resistance, despite being upset, with the belief that they'd return once the war had concluded. To this day, Imber and its surrounding land remain a military training ground. The villagers never returned, and just the shell of what was once a community remains.Structured in three movements, it is on this very real story that the work is based, setting out the series of events of 1943 in chronological order.The first movement, On Imber Downe, portrays a sense of jollity and cohesiveness, a community of individuals living and working together before news of the evacuation had broken. Sounds of the village are heard throughout, not least in a series of percussive effects, the anvil of the blacksmith; the cowbell of the cattle and the bells of the church.The second movement, The Church of St. Giles, begins mysteriously and this sonorous, atmospheric opening depicts Imber in its desolate state and the apprehension of residents as they learn they have to leave their homes. Amidst this is the Church, a symbol of hope for villagers who one day wish to return, portrayed with a sweeping melodic passage before the music returns to the apprehension of villagers facing eviction around their sadness at losing their rural way of life.In complete contrast, the third movement, Imemerie Aeternum, portrays the arrival of the military, complete with the sounds of the ammunition, firing and tanks, sounds which were all too familiar to those living in the surround areas. To close, the Church of St. Giles theme returns in a triumphant style, representing the idea that the church has always been, even to this day, a beacon of hope for the villagers and local community, both the centrepiece and pinnacle of a very real story.Duration: 13.30

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £79.95

    Lost Village of Imber, The - Christopher Bond

    The village of Imber on Salisbury Plain had been inhabited for over one thousand years when it was evacuated in 1943 to make way for military training in the Second World War. At the time, with preparations for the Allied invasion of Europe underway, most villagers put up no resistance, despite being upset, with the belief that they'd return once the war had concluded. To this day, Imber and its surrounding land remain a military training ground. The villagers never returned, and just the shell of what was once a community remains. Structured in three movements, it is on this very real story that the work is based, setting out the series of events of 1943 in chronological order. The first movement, On Imber Downe, portrays a sense of jollity and cohesiveness - a community of individuals living and working together before news of the evacuation had broken. Sounds of the village are heard throughout, not least in a series of percussive effects - the anvil of the blacksmith; the cowbell of the cattle and the bells of the church. The second movement, The Church of St. Giles, begins mysteriously and this sonorous, atmospheric opening depicts Imber in its desolate state and the apprehension of residents as they learn they have to leave their homes. Amidst this is the Church, a symbol of hope for villagers who one day wish to return, portrayed with a sweeping melodic passage before the music returns to the apprehension of villagers facing eviction around their sadness at losing their rural way of life. In complete contrast, the third movement, Imemerie Aeternum, portrays the arrival of the military, complete with the sounds of the ammunition, firing and tanks - sounds which were all too familiar to those living in the surround areas. To close, the Church of St. Giles theme returns in a triumphant style, representing the idea that the church has always been, even to this day, a beacon of hope for the villagers and local community - both the centrepiece and pinnacle of a very real story. The work was commissioned by Bratton Silver Band in celebration of the band's 160th Anniversary, with funding from the Arts Council National Lottery Project Grants Fund and the Brass Bands England Norman Jones Trust Fund.

    Estimated dispatch 5-10 working days
  • £65.00

    RISE OF THE PHOENIX (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Barry, Darrol

    As the title suggests, the phoenix was a fabulous mythical bird, who every morning at dawn, sang a song so enchanting that even the sun God, Apollo, would stop and listen. The bird would live for a hundred years, and at the end of its life, would build a pyre, set it on fire and be consumed by the flames. After three days, the phoenix would be reborn from the ashes, to sing once more.This work was commissioned by Clifton and Lightcliffe Band and reflects the difficulties and rebirth of the band to make music once more.Suitable for second section bands and above.

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £27.50

    RISE OF THE PHOENIX (Brass Band - Score only) - Barry, Darrol

    As the title suggests, the phoenix was a fabulous mythical bird, who every morning at dawn, sang a song so enchanting that even the sun God, Apollo, would stop and listen. The bird would live for a hundred years, and at the end of its life, would build a pyre, set it on fire and be consumed by the flames. After three days, the phoenix would be reborn from the ashes, to sing once more.This work was commissioned by Clifton and Lightcliffe Band and reflects the difficulties and rebirth of the band to make music once more.Suitable for second section bands and above.

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days