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  • £14.95

    Marching to Glory - Ruben Schmidt

    This energetic piece focusses on the Christian's life goal of 'marching home to Glory' which is described in the first verse of William James Pearson's song.We are marching home to Glory, Marching up to mansions bright,Where bright golden harps are playing,Where the saints are robed in white.There's a golden harp in Glory,There's a spotless robe for you;March with us to the hallelujah city,To the land beyond the blue.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £24.95

    Scooby Doo (Where Are You?) - B Raleigh

    A classic arrangement of the theme tune to the 1960s cartoonScooby Doo (Where Are You?), arranged for brass band by Andrew Duncan.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £79.95

    Malcolm Arnold Variations - Score and Parts - Martin Ellerby

    MALCOLM ARNOLD VARIATIONS was commissioned by Philip Biggs and Richard Franklin for the 20th All England Masters International Brass Band Championship held in the Corn Exchange, Cambridge on 25 May 2008. The work is dedicated to Anthony Day, long time carer of Sir Malcolm Arnold in his final years. I first met Malcolm and Anthony in 1990 and remained in constant touch until Malcolm’s passing in 2006. Anthony, of course, remains a friend and plays his own role subliminally in this piece. The work is not based on any of Malcolm Arnold’s own themes, rather it is a portrait of him (and by association Anthony Day) through my eyes and as a result of my friendship with both parties over some 18 years. If there is any theme as such it is the personalities of the players, the protagonist and his carer placed together by my own efforts coloured and influenced by aspects of Arnold’s style and technique without recourse to direct quotation but through allusion and parody. It is of course designed as a brass band test piece but in my eyes is first and foremost a musical challenge. The pyrotechnical elements are there but always secondary to the musical thrust of the work’s structure. I have long beforehand submerged myself in Malcolm Arnold’s music and ultimately delivered this tribute. Music Directors will be advised to acquaint themselves with the composer’s personal music, particularly the film scores, symphonies, concertos and ballets: the solutions towards a successful interpretation of my piece are all in there – and YES, I want, and sanction, this piece to be interpreted, and therein lies the challenge for those of you ‘up front’! The challenge for players is that of virtuosity, ensemble and careful attention to where they are individually in relation to their colleagues – a question of balance, taste and insight. With regard to tempi, as is my usual custom, I have indicated all metronome marks with the prefix circa. I would suggest that the fast music is played at these tempos but that the more rubato moments can be allowed some freedom in expression and fluidity of line. With regard to the type of mutes to be employed – this decision I leave to the discretion of players and conductors. Structurally the work is cast as an Introduction, 20 Variations and a Finale. Some variations are self contained, others run into each other as sequences in the same tempo. In other variations, segments are repeated and developed. I could describe the overall concept as a miniature ballet or a condensed film score – there is much drama and character and the repeated elements assist this in driving the action forward. I have deliberately avoided the more extremely dark qualities of Malcolm’s own music in this, my celebration of this master-composer, as I have always viewed (and evidenced by my previous Masters scores Tristan Encounters and Chivalry) that the Cambridge contest is a ‘sunshine- affair’ and firmly believe that Malcolm Arnold would have had it no other way too!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £39.95

    Malcolm Arnold Variations - Score Only - Martin Ellerby

    MALCOLM ARNOLD VARIATIONS was commissioned by Philip Biggs and Richard Franklin for the 20th All England Masters International Brass Band Championship held in the Corn Exchange, Cambridge on 25 May 2008. The work is dedicated to Anthony Day, long time carer of Sir Malcolm Arnold in his final years. I first met Malcolm and Anthony in 1990 and remained in constant touch until Malcolm’s passing in 2006. Anthony, of course, remains a friend and plays his own role subliminally in this piece. The work is not based on any of Malcolm Arnold’s own themes, rather it is a portrait of him (and by association Anthony Day) through my eyes and as a result of my friendship with both parties over some 18 years. If there is any theme as such it is the personalities of the players, the protagonist and his carer placed together by my own efforts coloured and influenced by aspects of Arnold’s style and technique without recourse to direct quotation but through allusion and parody. It is of course designed as a brass band test piece but in my eyes is first and foremost a musical challenge. The pyrotechnical elements are there but always secondary to the musical thrust of the work’s structure. I have long beforehand submerged myself in Malcolm Arnold’s music and ultimately delivered this tribute. Music Directors will be advised to acquaint themselves with the composer’s personal music, particularly the film scores, symphonies, concertos and ballets: the solutions towards a successful interpretation of my piece are all in there – and YES, I want, and sanction, this piece to be interpreted, and therein lies the challenge for those of you ‘up front’! The challenge for players is that of virtuosity, ensemble and careful attention to where they are individually in relation to their colleagues – a question of balance, taste and insight. With regard to tempi, as is my usual custom, I have indicated all metronome marks with the prefix circa. I would suggest that the fast music is played at these tempos but that the more rubato moments can be allowed some freedom in expression and fluidity of line. With regard to the type of mutes to be employed – this decision I leave to the discretion of players and conductors. Structurally the work is cast as an Introduction, 20 Variations and a Finale. Some variations are self contained, others run into each other as sequences in the same tempo. In other variations, segments are repeated and developed. I could describe the overall concept as a miniature ballet or a condensed film score – there is much drama and character and the repeated elements assist this in driving the action forward. I have deliberately avoided the more extremely dark qualities of Malcolm’s own music in this, my celebration of this master-composer, as I have always viewed (and evidenced by my previous Masters scores Tristan Encounters and Chivalry) that the Cambridge contest is a ‘sunshine- affair’ and firmly believe that Malcolm Arnold would have had it no other way too!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.99

    Scooby Doo (Where Are You?) (Score & Parts) (Brass Band/Score & Parts) - Ben Raleigh

    A classic arrangement of the theme tune to the 1960s cartoon , arranged for brass band by Andrew Duncan.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £9.99

    Scooby Doo (Where Are You?) (Score) (Brass Band/Score)

    A classic arrangement of the theme tune to the 1960s cartoon , arranged for brass band by Andrew Duncan.Brass Band Grade 4: Advanced Youth and 3rd Section

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £24.95

    SCOOBY DOO (Where are You?) (Brass Band) - Duncan, Andrew

    A classic arrangement of the theme tune to the 1960s cartoon Scooby Doo, arranged for brass band by Andrew Duncan. Suitable for all brass bands

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £64.95

    Sleepless Cities - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    I have been very fortunate in my life to have visited many wonderful countries and places around the world as a musician, whether it is as a composer, performer, conductor or soloist. From my experiences I wanted to compose a piece of music that showcases cities that never stop and have a constant hubbub of energy.The ‘Sleepless Cities' that have influenced the basis of this work are New York, London, Sydney, Tokyo, Istanbul, Amsterdam, Zurich, Cairo and Dubai. However, when composing this piece I decided it would be impossible to assign a particular musical theme that sums up each city, as they all have such a rich and diverse cultural establishment.Therefore I opted not to compose this piece in separate movements to identify each city. Instead, I composed a piece where each city blends into one another, almost as if you were taking a speedy cab ride through each bustling metropolis without a break and without the constraints of time or distance. With each metaphoric turn round a street corner you arrive in a different city and before the listener can get used to the surroundings the cab turns again into another conurbation.Sleepless Cities is composed using melodic lines that follow in the traditional western classical style. However, as some of these places are so culturally diverse, you will also hear other cultural musical influences; for example the opening uses elements of an Indian Raga and the euphonium cadenza at bar 126 is based on the Middle Eastern Islamic call to prayer. You will also hear examples of gamelan music and the use of consecutive 4th and 5th intervals including the pentatonic scale which is a trade mark of Chinese, Japanese and Indonesian traditional music. There are also a number of occasions where both the western and eastern musical styles amalgamate highlighting the natural harmony that the differing genres share in one place.Paul Lovatt-Cooper 2009

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £25.00 £25.00
    Buy from Peter Meechan Music

    Cantus (on E.D.) - Peter Meechan

    From Leanne Stamp:"As musicians,I think we really identify ourselves and our existence on being musicians. And we collect these teachings and bondsalong our path. But whendoes it happen? When does that moment happen that someone becomes an integral part of the fabric that makes you who you are? Or when can you pinpointthe momentthat you realize that a person was essential in your path? I don’t think we know. And all too many times it isn’t until someone is gone that we truly reflect and try to figure it out.When Ed De'Ath joined our band (Las Vegas Brass Band) he hadn’t played in over 20 years. He heard the brass band and decided he wanted to go back to playing, and within a few weeks became a member of LVBB.He had grown up playing in Canada, where his father was a brass musician too, and Ed was quite an accomplished young euphonium player competing in competitions and playing in Salvation Army bands.But life happened and it lead him away from playing.Even though I was in LVBB a few years before Edjoined, he quickly became an essential part of what makes that group a family. I spent the better part of a decade playing in the same section as him and then about 5 years sitting next to him on either side.Ed always took a sincere interest in myplaying. Praising the good and giving constructive criticism for improvement. For about two years almost every otherSaturdaywasspent playing duets at his house.I left to study at the RNCM in Manchester, UK, before returning to Las Vegas.My first rehearsal back from the RNCM Ed looked at me said, “here you go kiddo, you’ve earned this solo seat”.There was no ego. Only the wish for me to reach my potential. It was always so apparent with Ed the love he shared for the younger musicians and his desire for them to succeed.Ed lit up the room with his enthusiasm and love for music – he just truly loved being there. That special quality that makes a band a family...he knew and treasured that.And although Ed wasn’t my teacher per say, he was an integral part of my fabric.The way Ed left was sudden. He had been fighting bladder cancer in and off for quite a while but things were looking up. Tests were clear. And then a very aggressive pancreatic cancer stole him very quickly, almost without warning.And I will never forget how I felt getting that call. We decided to have rehearsal that night. And for one reason. Because Ed would’ve wanted us to.I will always be grateful to Ed. Grateful that I got tolearn things from him, receive advice, enjoy his company, and feel his love – part of him is with me whenever I play."

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £49.95

    The Haunted Halls - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    This work was commissioned by Philip Biggs and Dr. Nicholas Childs for the National Children's Brass Band of Great Britain summer course 2006.The idea behind the piece lies with the magnificent surroundings in which the annual National Children's Brass Band of Great Britain course is held, The Bromsgrove School. The course is held over a week long period at the school. Both staff and students stay on the premises for the duration, making use of the schools boarding facilities. The school itself is huge with various buildings on site and steeped in history. On entering the premises you are immediately engulfed in the school's splendid grandeur and tradition as its unique appearance grabs you and whisks you off to a world of old fashioned headmasters, public schoolboys and boarding school antics. As the evening draws to a close there is a dark and eerie side to the building that sends a tingle up your spine. The piece originated from a story I imagined where at night ghouls, ghosts and spirits emerge from inside the building's walls, paintings and surroundings to cause havoc in their desperate attempt to free themselves from the purgatory that is the spirit world by haunting the living. A group of pupils wake, hearing the commotion and startle the spirits who see this as an opportunity to possess the beings in order to free them from their turmoil. A great chase ensues with the pupils using any means possible to escape from their pursuing spirits.The only weapon against the spirits is the dawning sunshine and so the adventure begins with the pupils having to escape from the chasing spirits and hope that dawn breaks and the sunshine engulfs the supernatural, imploding them back to their world. Paul Lovatt-Cooper (August 2006)

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days