Searching for Wind Band Music? Visit the Wind Band Music Shop
We've found 130 matches for your search

Results

  • £21.50

    I Left My Heart In San Francisco - Cross & Reed - Neville Buxton

    This much loved ballad have been arranged as a Euphonium solo by Neville Buxton. Released by Tony Bennet, it became a gold-selling Top Ten hit that stayed in the charts almost three years. With intricate band parts and an unforgettable solo line, this arrangement will bring back the memories of the 60's to your concert audience.Free solo part available on request. Email - [email protected]

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

     PDF View Music

  • £19.50

    The Verdant Braes Of Skreen - Traditional - Max Stannard

    Ireland is renowned for having an almost endless list of folk tunes that have been passed down from generation to generation. Now, in a moving arrangement for the Flugel soloist, 'The Verdant Braes of Skreen' has been arranged by Max Stannard and is the perfect choice for bands and soloists looking to indulge in a little Irish culture. The title has been open to debate for some time, however it is believed that the 'Screen' refers to Ballinascreen in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland and a "Brae" is a steeped bank or a hillside. A lovely addition to any soloists repertoire.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

     PDF View Music

  • £21.50

    Wedding Music (Selections For A Wedding) - Various - Gavin Somerset

    With more and more brass bands performing at weddings, having the correct music is essential for the couple's perfect day. With most of the traditional wedding music coming from large overtures & operas etc, this unique pack of music has been specially designed to minimise fuss (all 4 pieces are printed on just one sheet per part) and have just the "famous" bits included. Specially arranged by Gavin Somerset so that the pieces included can be performed from anything ranging from a full brass band to a brass quintet group and with repeats that can be cut or performed to tailor to each event. The pieces are???BRIDAL CHORUS (from Lohengrin) By Richard Wagner"Here comes the bride"??? is the standard march played for the bride's entrance at many formal weddings. The wedding between Elsa and Lohengrin however was almost an immidiate failure!PACHELBEL'S CANON By Johann PachelbelFormally known as the Canon & Gigue in D and originally composed for a string quartet, the Canon part of the composition has become a favorite at weddings, either as an alternative to the Bridal Chorus (above) or used during the signing of the register. The convention in the Baroque era would have been to play a piece of this type in the moderate to fast tempo, however at weddings it has become fashionable to play the work at a slow tempo.WEDDING MARCH (from "A Midsummer Night's Dream") By Felix MendelsshonPopularized by Princess Victoria's wedding to Prince Frederick William of Prussia and coupled with the Bridal Chorus for the entry of the bride, this Wedding March is often for the recessional at the end. Prelude to "Te Deum" By Charpentier Another item now popular in its use during weddings for its bright fanfares. Many composers have written music to the "Te Deum" text (Te Deum being an early Christian hymn of praise, used still regularly in the R.C Church). The prelude by Charpentier is by far one of the most famous

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £34.99 £34.99
    Buy from Marcato Brass

    Euphoria | Chris Ellis

    Opening with a slow minor-key melody, the theme develops tonally before the tom-toms herald a faster, more rhythmic section, developing into a toe-tapping jig-like tune, finally slowing back into the almost meditative motif mirroring the original passage. An original style to add variety to your band concerts. The Minor key adagio opening bars of this number has an uplifting 'choral like' orchestration with an almost 'what's coming next' undertone, with Euphoniums leading the way. The pace and feel changes totally at the Allegro with the tom toms taking the tempo up with a toe tapping jig like rhythm and a move to the Major Key. A clever contrast in the next section has the rhythmic triplet pattern played against a quaver melody, before full band join in with the dance quality of this section. The end section of Euphoria returns to the adagio with an uplifting and real sense of reaching a goal.Skill Level: Intermediate

  • £34.99 £34.99
    Buy from Marcato Brass

    I See the Fatherland | Dario Salvi

    Dario Salvi has reconstructed Franz von Suppes operetta 'Die Afrikareise' (A Trip to Africa) in a ground breaking project with Winsconsin University and the Strauss Society, which will see the operetta being performed in English for the first time in 100 years. This march for Brass Band brings together themes from the operetta under the title 'I See the Fatherland'[su_quote cite="Dario Salvi 2015?]After almost two years of work on the score of the Operetta, during which I extensively worked on preparing a full orchestral score with all the singing parts in English, it is almost time to stage the work. The music from 'A Trip To Africa' is full of amazing melodies and interesting ideas. This march for Brass Band is a collection of some of the themes from the Operetta: The "Entrance of Titania" Fanfare leads to one of the most recurring themes, where the singer declares their desire to go back to their Fatherland (in this case Naples) after their visit to the very exotic Cairo; the starting point of their adventure into the heart of the Desert. Exotic sounding yet very Viennese rhythms are the main characteristic of this march. [/su_quote]

  • £25.00

    Cantus (on E.D.) - Peter Meechan

    From Leanne Stamp:"As musicians,I think we really identify ourselves and our existence on being musicians. And we collect these teachings and bondsalong our path. But whendoes it happen? When does that moment happen that someone becomes an integral part of the fabric that makes you who you are? Or when can you pinpointthe momentthat you realize that a person was essential in your path? I don’t think we know. And all too many times it isn’t until someone is gone that we truly reflect and try to figure it out.When Ed De'Ath joined our band (Las Vegas Brass Band) he hadn’t played in over 20 years. He heard the brass band and decided he wanted to go back to playing, and within a few weeks became a member of LVBB.He had grown up playing in Canada, where his father was a brass musician too, and Ed was quite an accomplished young euphonium player competing in competitions and playing in Salvation Army bands.But life happened and it lead him away from playing.Even though I was in LVBB a few years before Edjoined, he quickly became an essential part of what makes that group a family. I spent the better part of a decade playing in the same section as him and then about 5 years sitting next to him on either side.Ed always took a sincere interest in myplaying. Praising the good and giving constructive criticism for improvement. For about two years almost every otherSaturdaywasspent playing duets at his house.I left to study at the RNCM in Manchester, UK, before returning to Las Vegas.My first rehearsal back from the RNCM Ed looked at me said, “here you go kiddo, you’ve earned this solo seat”.There was no ego. Only the wish for me to reach my potential. It was always so apparent with Ed the love he shared for the younger musicians and his desire for them to succeed.Ed lit up the room with his enthusiasm and love for music – he just truly loved being there. That special quality that makes a band a family...he knew and treasured that.And although Ed wasn’t my teacher per say, he was an integral part of my fabric.The way Ed left was sudden. He had been fighting bladder cancer in and off for quite a while but things were looking up. Tests were clear. And then a very aggressive pancreatic cancer stole him very quickly, almost without warning.And I will never forget how I felt getting that call. We decided to have rehearsal that night. And for one reason. Because Ed would’ve wanted us to.I will always be grateful to Ed. Grateful that I got tolearn things from him, receive advice, enjoy his company, and feel his love – part of him is with me whenever I play."

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £64.95

    Concerto for Tenor Horn - Gareth Wood

    Gareth Wood's Concerto for Tenor Horn was commissioned by the Welsh Amateur Music Federation with additional funding from the Arts Council of Wales and the PRS Foundation. The work was written for Owen Farr and the National Youth Brass Band of Wales.It is in a traditional three movement form demonstrating the agility and lyricism of the tenor horn. The soloist begins alone with a singing melody in 5/4 time, and is soon joined by the Eb tuba and solo cornet. The rest of the band later emerge, leading the music into a strident Allegro. After a short tutti the soloist takes charge and a dialogue of melodic and rhythmic ideas follows. After a brief return to the opening theme the movement closes with a flourish. The second movement is a true Adagio. A profound beginning, almost hymn like, leads into a gentle melody which builds into a large tutti for band. A rhythmic section follows, rhapsodic in nature ending in a return to the melody used at the very beginning of the concerto. After another short tutti section the movement gently fades away. The finale is a combination of technical fireworks and an almost latin melody, both soloist and band finishing with great aplomb!Gareth Wood's Concerto for Tenor Horn received its world premiere by Owen Farr and the National Youth Brass Band of Wales under the direction of Dr. Robert Childs during their Summer Course of 2006 at Bangor University's Pritchard-Jones Concert Hall, North Wales.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £60.00

    Danceries

    In Danceries , by Kenneth Hesketh, the melodies themselves are a mixture of old and new. Where the old occurs it has been adapted in mood and composition and is often interspersed with completely new material. The contemporary harmonies and rhythms bring a breath of new into these themes and add drama to the suite. The first movement, Lull Me Beyond Thee , is gentle and lilting, almost a barcarole, this movement is very much a reverie. The original tune had the name ‘Poor Robin’s Maggot’, a rather disconcerting title; maggot, however, in seventeenth-century parlance meant whim or fancy. The second, Catching of Quails , is a colourful, buoyant scherzo on an original melody. The thematic material is shuttled around the band to contrast with full-blooded tuttis. The last few bars fade to almost nothing, before a final surprise! My Lady’s Rest is a tender pavane, also on an original melody, with Moorish leanings. Beautiful solo passages, expressive contrapuntal writing and warm tuttis provide an opportunity to show off the most lyrical of playing. The final movement, Quodling’s Delight is a clever combination of the 17th century melody, 'Goddesses', with an original contrasting melody, creating a rousing and exuberant finale to the work. A sound clip of the last movement, Quodling's Delight , can be found here Item Code: 0-571-56512-3 Duration: c.15'40"

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £74.95

    Eden - John Pickard

    This work was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the final of the 2005 Besson National Brass Band Championship, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London.The score is prefaced by the final lines from Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost (completed in 1663), in which Adam and Eve, expelled from Paradise, make their uncertain way into the outside world:“…The world was all before them, where to chooseTheir place of rest, and providence their guide:They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow,Through Eden took their solitary way.”My work is in three linked sections. In the first, the characters of Adam, Eve and the serpent guarding the Tree of Knowledge are respectively represented by solo euphonium, cornet and trombone. The music opens in an idyllic and tranquil mood and leads into a duet between euphonium and cornet. Throughout this passage the prevailing mood darkens, though the soloists seem to remain oblivious to the increasingly fraught atmosphere. A whip-crack announces the malevolent appearance of the solo trombone who proceeds to engage the solo cornet in a sinister dialogue.The second section interprets the Eden story as a modern metaphor for the havoc mankind has inflicted upon the world, exploiting and abusing its resources in the pursuit of wealth. Though certainly intended here as a comment on the present-day, it is by no means a new idea: Milton himself had an almost prescient awareness of it in Book I of his poem, where men, led on by Mammon:“…Ransacked the centre and with impious handsRifled the bowels of their mother earthFor treasures better hid. Soon had his crewOpened into the hill a spacious woundAnd digged out ribs of gold.”So this section is fast and violent, at times almost manic in its destructive energy. At length a furious climax subsides and a tolling bell ushers in the third and final section.This final part is slow, beginning with an intense lament featuring solos for tenor-horn, fl?gel-horn and repiano cornet and joined later by solo baritone, soprano cornet, Eb-bass and Bb-bass.At one stage in the planning of the work it seemed likely that the music would end here – in despair. Then, mid-way through writing it, I visited the extraordinary Eden Project in Cornwall. Here, in a disused quarry – a huge man-made wound in the earth – immense biomes, containing an abundance of plant species from every region of the globe, together with an inspirational education programme, perhaps offer a small ray of hope for the future. This is the image behind the work’s conclusion and the optimism it aims to express is real enough, though it is hard-won and challenged to the last.John Pickard 2005

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £74.95

    Eden - Score & Parts - John Pickard

    This work was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the final of the 2005 Besson National Brass Band Championship, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London.The score is prefaced by the final lines from Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost (completed in 1663), in which Adam and Eve, expelled from Paradise, make their uncertain way into the outside world:“…The world was all before them, where to chooseTheir place of rest, and providence their guide:They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow,Through Eden took their solitary way.”My work is in three linked sections. In the first, the characters of Adam, Eve and the serpent guarding the Tree of Knowledge are respectively represented by solo euphonium, cornet and trombone. The music opens in an idyllic and tranquil mood and leads into a duet between euphonium and cornet. Throughout this passage the prevailing mood darkens, though the soloists seem to remain oblivious to the increasingly fraught atmosphere. A whip-crack announces the malevolent appearance of the solo trombone who proceeds to engage the solo cornet in a sinister dialogue.The second section interprets the Eden story as a modern metaphor for the havoc mankind has inflicted upon the world, exploiting and abusing its resources in the pursuit of wealth. Though certainly intended here as a comment on the present-day, it is by no means a new idea: Milton himself had an almost prescient awareness of it in Book I of his poem, where men, led on by Mammon:“…Ransacked the centre and with impious handsRifled the bowels of their mother earthFor treasures better hid. Soon had his crewOpened into the hill a spacious woundAnd digged out ribs of gold.”So this section is fast and violent, at times almost manic in its destructive energy. At length a furious climax subsides and a tolling bell ushers in the third and final section.This final part is slow, beginning with an intense lament featuring solos for tenor-horn, fl?gel-horn and repiano cornet and joined later by solo baritone, soprano cornet, Eb-bass and Bb-bass.At one stage in the planning of the work it seemed likely that the music would end here – in despair. Then, mid-way through writing it, I visited the extraordinary Eden Project in Cornwall. Here, in a disused quarry – a huge man-made wound in the earth – immense biomes, containing an abundance of plant species from every region of the globe, together with an inspirational education programme, perhaps offer a small ray of hope for the future. This is the image behind the work’s conclusion and the optimism it aims to express is real enough, though it is hard-won and challenged to the last.John Pickard 2005

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days