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  • £21.50

    Sibelius Fantasy - Gavin Somerset

    Composed in 2003 for a composition competition, this work uses elements of three major work by the Finnish composer Jean Sibelius (1865-1957). The three being... Symphony No.5, Finlandia, Karelia Suite (March) The piece starts with an atmospheric opening before setting of in bar 10 with a tempo that will remain for most of the piece. The main original theme is brought in at A before the famous sequence from Sibelius' Symphony No.5 enters at B and then very distinctly at C. The music then rollercoasts through keeping all sections of the band busy, until we reach J when the solo Euphonium can shine, helped along by Flugel and Repiano. The Molto Vivo before K sets off with dazzling trills from the cornet section, and bringing with it the theme from Finlandia in bar 165, followed shortly by the March from the Karelia Suite. From N to the end, all three pieces are brought to a final climax together. A rousing piece and makes an interesting change to a direct transcription.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days
  • £69.95

    Trombone Concerto (Trombone Solo with Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Wiffin, Rob

    My Trombone Concerto was commissioned by Brett Baker following an earlier piece I had written for him called Shout! It was composed in Spain in the summer of 2010. Once I started writing I realised that this concerto was inevitably going to draw on my own experiences as a trombone player. The first movement was really a matter of getting the right thematic ideas and balancing the tutti and solo passages so, for formal structure, I studied the Gordon Jacob Trombone Concerto. There is a lyrical section preceding the first Allegro that owes much in spirit (but not in the actual music) to The Eternal Quest, Ray Steadman-Allen's Salvation Army solo. The slow movement seemed determined to come out in the vein of a Richard Strauss song. I wanted to write something ineluctably 'cantabile' as we trombone players rarely get a chance to play the melody. There is a brief allusion to that wonderful moment when the trombone gets to sing above the orchestra in Sibelius' seventh symphony. Arthur Wilson, that great exponent of the singing style in trombone-playing and my teacher at college died in the summer of 2010 so it seemed appropriate to dedicate this movement to him. The last movement is the lightest of the three in style and is slightly jazz-inflected, hopefully providing some fun for the soloist. While wanting to test the instrument I did not set out with the intention of making the concerto difficult but there are undoubtedly challenges of technique, range and style to be met by the soloist.- Rob Wiffin

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days

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  • £34.95

    Trombone Concerto (Trombone Solo with Brass Band - Score only) - Wiffin, Rob

    My Trombone Concerto was commissioned by Brett Baker following an earlier piece I had written for him called Shout! It was composed in Spain in the summer of 2010. Once I started writing I realised that this concerto was inevitably going to draw on my own experiences as a trombone player. The first movement was really a matter of getting the right thematic ideas and balancing the tutti and solo passages so, for formal structure, I studied the Gordon Jacob Trombone Concerto. There is a lyrical section preceding the first Allegro that owes much in spirit (but not in the actual music) to The Eternal Quest, Ray Steadman-Allen's Salvation Army solo. The slow movement seemed determined to come out in the vein of a Richard Strauss song. I wanted to write something ineluctably 'cantabile' as we trombone players rarely get a chance to play the melody. There is a brief allusion to that wonderful moment when the trombone gets to sing above the orchestra in Sibelius' seventh symphony. Arthur Wilson, that great exponent of the singing style in trombone-playing and my teacher at college died in the summer of 2010 so it seemed appropriate to dedicate this movement to him. The last movement is the lightest of the three in style and is slightly jazz-inflected, hopefully providing some fun for the soloist. While wanting to test the instrument I did not set out with the intention of making the concerto difficult but there are undoubtedly challenges of technique, range and style to be met by the soloist.- Rob Wiffin

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days

     PDF View Music