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  • £34.95

    Revelation - Score Only - Philip Wilby

    Symphony for Double Brass on a theme of Purcell 1995 marked the tercentenary of Purcell's death, and my new score Revelation has been written as a tribute to his music and the ornate and confident spirit of his age. There are five major sections: 1 Prologue 2 Variations on a ground bass I 3 Fugue 4 Variations on a ground bass II 5 Epilogue and Resurrection The score uses many features of the Baroque Concerto Grosso, and arranges players in two equal groups from which soloists emerge to play in a variety ofvirtuoso ensembles. It quotes freely from Purcell's own piece Three Parts on a Ground in which he has composed a brilliant sequence of variations over a repeating six-note bass figure. This original motif can be heard most clearly beneath the duet for Cornet 5 and Soprano at the beginning of the 2nd section. There is, of course, a religious dimension to Revelation as the title suggests, and the score is prefaced by lines by the 17th century poet John Donne. His Holy Sonnet paraphrases the Book of Revelation in which the dead are raised at the sounds of the last trumpet. Donne's trumpets are themselves placed stereophonically ". . . At the round Earth's imagined corners" and it is this feature that today's players represent as they move around the performing area. Their final apocalyptic fanfares can be heard at the close of the score, as Purcell's music re-enters in a lasting tribute to England's first composer of genius. Philip Wilby September 1995 At the round Earth imagined corners, blow your trumpets, angels, and arise, arise from death, you numberless infinities Of souls, and to your scattered bodies go. All whom the flood did, and fire shall o 'erthrow All whom war, dearth, age, agues, tyrannies, Despair, law, chance hath slain, and you whose eyes Shall Behold God, and never taste death woe. John Donne after Revelation Ch. 11 v.15

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £53.00

    Auld Lang Syne - Menno Haantjes

    Whereas 'Auld Lang Syne' may be considered the best-known Scottish song ever, yet at the same time it is an obscure one, for there are but few people who know the complete text by heart. After the familiar 'Should auld acquaintance be forgot .....' many people take their refuge to lyrics like 'rum tee dum ta dee ..... lah, lah, lah ........... for auld lang syne'. Even in Scotland only a handful of persons know the entire text and are able to give a correct rendering of it. The current lyrics have been attributed to the Scottish poet Robert Burns. Burns, however, he did not write the whole poem : after he had heard an old man sing the centuries-old Scotch ballad, he wrote it down and added a number of stanzas (1788). Historical research teaches us that the ballad served many purposes, both political and religious. Nowadays, 'Auld Lang Syne' is sung as a Christmas Carol and it is also sung on New Year's Eve at the turning of the year. Apart from that, though, the song is also sung on many other occasions - sometimes with different lyrics, which usually have Love, Friendship and/or Parting as their themes, as these go well with the fascinating melody. In this arrangement a low-sounding solo instrument is central. The harmonization in the accompaniment fits in perfectly with the sentiments this song will evoke. Should auld acquaintance be forgot And never brought to mind? Should auld acquintance be forgot. And days of auld lang syne? For auld lang syne, my dear, For auld lang syne, We'll take a cup of kindness yet, For auld lang syne.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £29.95

    Water Lilies - Jonathan Bates

    DURATION: 5'00". DIFFICULTY: 1st Section+. 'Water Lilies' is a setting of a short poem by the American War poet Sara Teasdale from 1937. Teasdale's evocative writing is steadily becoming a renowned influence for composers - particularly in the choral scene, and this was where my first introduction to her work was founded in a work by Eriks Esenvalds entitled 'Stars'. . The percussion writing in this depicts a gentle ripple on a lake as water lilies float by at dusk, whilst the band writing explores a deep and personal interpretation of Teasdale's words which whilst on the face seem quite dark and brooding, yet really seem to express a feeling of longing and determination. . Water Lilies . If you have forgotten water lilies floating . On a dark lake among mountains in the afternoon shade, . If you have forgotten their wet, sleepy fragrance, . Then you can return and not be afraid. . But if you remember, then turn away forever . To the plains and the prairies where pools are far apart, . There you will not come at dusk on closing water lilies, . And the shadow of mountains will not fall on your heart. . Sara Teasdale (1937). .

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £86.00

    O Helga natt - Adolphe Adam - Jerker Johansson

    O Holy Night is a very well-known Christmas carol. The origin of the carol is French beginning with the words: "Minuit! Chretiens, c'est l'heure solennelle". It is about the birth of Jesus and was written in 1843 by a wine merchant and poet by the name of Placide Cappeau (1808??"77). He turned to the composer Adolphe Adam (1803??"56) and asked him to write a suitable melody. The result was brilliant and the carol was premiered in Cappeau's home town Roquemaure in 1847 by the opera singer Emily Laurey. Based on Cappeau's French text, the English version was written in 1855 by an American Unitarian (Calvinist) minister by the name of John Sullivan Dwight (1813??"93).Adolphe Adam was the son of the pianist and composer Louis Adam (1758??"1848), who did not want his son to follow in his foot-steps as a musician. However, Adolphe wanted otherwise, and already at the age of 17 he was accepted to study at the music conservatoire in Paris. He was a student under Francois Adrien Boieldieu and composed several comical operas that became successful. After the July-revolution 1830 Adam moved to London. He worked for a couple of years before returning to Paris, where he founded a new opera house in 1847, the Theatre national. After the revolution in 1848 it had to close and Adam was ruined, why he had to go back to composing. In 1856 he concluded the ballet Le Corsaire, which together with the ballet Giselle are his most performed works today.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £49.95

    Ruslan & Ludmilla - Mikhail Glinka - Robert Childs

    Glinka's Ruslan & Ludmilla was first performed on December 9, 1842, in St.Petersburg.Once a popular and influential composer, Mikhail Glinka (1804-1857) is primarily remembered today for two operas: A Life for the Tsar (1836) and Ruslan and Ludmilla (1842). The latter, based on the work that brought poet Alexander Pushkin his first success in 1820, seems both a perfect operatic subject and an impossibility.A complicated fairy tale of love overcoming all obstacles, it features a flying dwarf who gets his power from his beard, a fight with a giant disembodied head, a rescue foiled, a slain hero resurrected, and a happy ending with the lovers reunited!Glinka worked intermittently on the Opera for five years and left the composition of the overture to the last minute. Despite the inventiveness of the music and its many memorable melodies, the Opera Ruslan and Ludmilla was a failure. Nevertheless the Overture is a firm favourite and here we have an expertly crafted arrangement for brass band from the pen of Dr Robert Childs.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £25.00 £25.00
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    Elizabethan Serenade - Ronald Binge - Len Jenkins

    Elizabethan Serenade was composed in 1951 by Ronald (Ronnie) Binge. When Walter Eastman at publishers Ascherberg, Hopwood & Crew (who had given Ronnie much encouragement following his return to the music industry after the war) heard the piece he said it sounded like an Elizabethan serenade and with the accession of Queen Elizabeth II in February 1952 and the advent of a second 'Elizabethan age' the piece was re-titled to that with which we are now familiar. The tune was used as the theme for the popular 1950s radio series Music Tapestry, Music in Miniature on the BBC and as the play-out for the British Forces Network radio station. It won an Ivor Novello award in 1957 and had chart successes in Germany and South Africa. Lyrics by poet Christopher Hassall were added later, along with those in German, Czech, Norwegian, Swedish, Finnish, Dutch, Danish and French. There was even a reggae version. In 2012, the year of the Queen's Jubilee, one website put it: "The song of the dayis Ronald Binge's Elizabethan Serenade" and, accordingly, it was played at the official Jubilee concert and The Last Night of the Proms.

  • £98.00

    Elegy I - Jacob de Haan

    Elegy I 'Jealousy' has been named after John Donne's poem of the same name. This English poet (1572-1631) wrote an entire series of elegies, each with its own theme. Jealousy can trigger various emotions, ranging from disappointment, grief, or regret, to madness and anger. All these emotions have been incorporated into this composition. Jacob de Haan was inspired by three different works of art: a poem (the aforementioned poem by John Donne), a painting by the Norwegian painter Edvard Munch (Jealousy in the Garden) and an old French chanson about jealousy (Je ne l'ose dire) by the sixteenth-century French composer Pierre Certon. The music refers repeatedly to this chanson - sometimes through key notes from the melody that serve as the starting point for new, isolated themes and sometimes through quotations of the original version

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £63.00

    Valerius Variations - Philip Sparke

    Dutch composer, artist and poet Adriaen Valerius is mostly remembered today for his collection of 79 songs for voice and lute or cittern, published posthumously in 1626. Philip Sparke has taken one melody from this collection that tells of the War of Independence with Spain. The beautiful slow melody is followed by a series of lively variations to form an extremely entertaining piece that will bring great joy to all who perform and listen to it.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £12.50

    Brother James' Air (Brass Band - Score Only) - Bain, James - Downie, Kenneth

    The 'brother James' who wrote this beautiful tune was James Leith Macbeth Bain. He was born in Scotland in 1840 and died in Liverpool in 1925. Besides being a musician, he was a poet, mystic and had a great interest in healing. He published a book called 'The brotherhood of healing' in 1906 and spent the latter years of his life working with the underprivileged in Liverpool. He wrote this simple but charming tune to accompany the familiar paraphrase of Psalm 23 which comes from the Scottish Psalter of 1650; 'The Lord's my shepherd, I'll not want'.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £55.95

    Stai si, defenda! (Stand Up, Defend!) - Traditional

    Stai si, defenda romontsch, tiu vegl lungatg (Stand up, defend your old Romansh language): This composition was named after a quotation from a poem by famous Romansh poet Giachen Casper Muoth. The arrangement deals with various well known songs for male choir such as A Trun sut igl ischi (In Trun under the malpe tree), Si sededesta Rezia (Wake up, land of Raetia), Il pur suveran (The independent farmer) or Il paun palus (The rosted bread). An atmospheric beginning over a pedal point uses quotations from these songs and leads eventually into a dark but warmly orchestrated section on Nossa viarva (Our language) by H. Erni. The piece ends, once more quoting A Trun sut igl ischi by J. Heim, a dedication to struggle for freedom and independence.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days