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  • £69.95

    Revelation - Score and Parts - Philip Wilby

    Symphony for Double Brass on a theme of Purcell 1995 marked the tercentenary of Purcell's death, and my new score Revelation has been written as a tribute to his music and the ornate and confident spirit of his age. There are five major sections: 1 Prologue 2 Variations on a ground bass I 3 Fugue 4 Variations on a ground bass II 5 Epilogue and Resurrection The score uses many features of the Baroque Concerto Grosso, and arranges players in two equal groups from which soloists emerge to play in a variety ofvirtuoso ensembles. It quotes freely from Purcell's own piece Three Parts on a Ground in which he has composed a brilliant sequence of variations over a repeating six-note bass figure. This original motif can be heard most clearly beneath the duet for Cornet 5 and Soprano at the beginning of the 2nd section. There is, of course, a religious dimension to Revelation as the title suggests, and the score is prefaced by lines by the 17th century poet John Donne. His Holy Sonnet paraphrases the Book of Revelation in which the dead are raised at the sounds of the last trumpet. Donne's trumpets are themselves placed stereophonically ". . . At the round Earth's imagined corners" and it is this feature that today's players represent as they move around the performing area. Their final apocalyptic fanfares can be heard at the close of the score, as Purcell's music re-enters in a lasting tribute to England's first composer of genius. Philip Wilby September 1995 At the round Earth imagined corners, blow your trumpets, angels, and arise, arise from death, you numberless infinities Of souls, and to your scattered bodies go. All whom the flood did, and fire shall o 'erthrow All whom war, dearth, age, agues, tyrannies, Despair, law, chance hath slain, and you whose eyes Shall Behold God, and never taste death woe. John Donne after Revelation Ch. 11 v.15

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    Ae Fond Kiss (Tenor Horn Solo with Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Burns, Robert - Graham, Peter

    Ae Fond Kiss, by the Scottish poet Robert Burns, is widely recognised as being one of the most poignant songs of lost love ever written. A brief affair with a Mrs Agnes Craig McLehose (known to Burns as Nancy) ended with her decision to join her estranged husband in Jamaica. Her parting gift to Burns was a lock of her hair which he had set in a ring. His gift to her included the poem, the first verse of which reflects Burns' feelings of resignation and despair:Ae fond kiss, and then we sever;Ae fareweel, alas, for ever!Deep in heart-wrung tears I'll pledge thee,Warring sighs and groans I'll wage thee!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £24.95

    Brother James' Air (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Bain, James - Downie, Kenneth

    The 'brother James' who wrote this beautiful tune was James Leith Macbeth Bain. He was born in Scotland in 1840 and died in Liverpool in 1925. Besides being a musician, he was a poet, mystic and had a great interest in healing. He published a book called 'The brotherhood of healing' in 1906 and spent the latter years of his life working with the underprivileged in Liverpool. He wrote this simple but charming tune to accompany the familiar paraphrase of Psalm 23 which comes from the Scottish Psalter of 1650; 'The Lord's my shepherd, I'll not want'.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £90.00

    Elegy I (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

    Elegy I 'Jealousy' has been named after John Donne's poem of the same name. This English poet (1572-1631) wrote an entire series of elegies, each with its own theme. Jealousy can trigger various emotions, ranging from disappointment, grief, or regret, to madness and anger. All these emotions have been incorporated into this composition. Jacob de Haan was inspired by three different works of art: a poem (the aforementioned poem by John Donne), a painting by the Norwegian painter Edvard Munch (Jealousy in the Garden) and an old French chanson about jealousy (Je ne l'ose dire) by the sixteenth-century French composer Pierre Certon. The music refers repeatedly to this chanson - sometimes through key notes from the melody that serve as the starting point for new, isolated themes and sometimes through quotations of the original version

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £39.00

    Lentini's Ballad (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

    Giacomo da Lentini was a 13th century Italian poet who was a notary at the court of the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II and is said to have invented the sonnet. Lentini's Ballad is based on the famous poem 'Amor e un desio che ven da core' (Love is a desire that comes from the heart). It sounds great as an instrumental work, but there is also an option for a vocal version using the Italian lyrics of the poem, making the arrangement even more special! 03:25

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £73.00

    A Spanish Christmas Carol - Patrick Millstone

    Rondeau of the Shepherds," so ran the official title of the famous Dutch Christmas carol 'Midden in de winternacht'. In 1948 wrote Dutch poet and writer Harry Prenen this text. The melody is known by the 17th/18th- century organ composers of suites Daquin, Balbastre and Dandrieu. "Rondeau of the Shepherds" was subtitled "Catalan Christmas Carol". The song itself is because its origins in a Spanish (Catalan probably) Christmas song from the late Middle Ages, "El Desembre congelat. The motives of this song (shepherds, flutes, drums) demonstrate knowledge of the Bible and give a picture of the late medieval Christmas experience. . Perfect as an uptempo intermezzo in a church service.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £144.00

    Dichter und Bauer - SUPPE, Franz von (Arr.: Jerome Naulais / Bertrand Moren)

    Poete et Paysan / Poet and Peasant

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £59.95

    PRINCESS AND THE POET, The (Brass Band Set)

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £59.95
  • £34.95

    Three Burns Portraits - Rodney Newton

    Robert Burns (1759-1796) was one of the most colourful literary figures of the 18th Century. The son of a tenant farmer, he was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, and earned a living variously as a farmer, flax dresser and exercise man, gradually establishing himself as a poet, lyricist and collector of folksongs. A charismatic character, by the time of his death he had become Scotland's best known and best-loved poet. This work depicts three characters from his personal life who also figure in his poetry. Although Burns intended much of his verse to be sung, and even wrote tunes himself for many of his lyrics, all the melodies in this work are original.I John AndersonJohn Anderson (1759-1832) was an Ayrshire carpenter and close friend to Robert Burns, who immortalised Anderson in his affectionate poem John Anderson Ma Jo, which imagines both men in old age (although Burns was only 37 when he died). Anderson is reputed to have made Robert Burns' coffin and survived the wrecking of the paddle steamer Cornet at Craignish Point near Oban during a storm in 1820, an event incorporated into this movement. This is a picture of a tough, resilient Scot who meets the storms of Life head-on.II Mary CampbellRobert Burns had numerous love affairs, sometimes with more than one woman at a time. Mary Campbell, a sailor's daughter from the highland district of Dunoon, had entered service with a family in Ayrshire when she met Burns. Although involved with another woman at the time, Burns was smitten with Campbell and there is evidence to suggest that he planned to emigrate to Jamaica with Mary. However, nothing came of this wild scheme and Mary, fearing disgrace and scandal left the area but not before Burns had enshrined her in at least two poems, Highland Mary and To Mary Campbell. Significantly, the first line of the latter runs, "Will ye go to the Indies, my Mary, and leave auld Scotia's Shore?" (His ardent pleading can be heard in the middle section of the movement). Mary's music paints a portrait of a graceful young lady who had the presence of mind not to be entirely won over by the charms of Robert Burns.III Douglas GrahamBurns was a heavy drinker, and this is most likely a contribution to his early death. He was matched in this capacity by his friend, Douglas 'Tam' Graham, a farmer who sought solace in the bottle from an unhappy marriage. Burns used his drinking partner as a model for the comic poem, Tam O'Shanter, which tells of a drunken Ayrshire farmer who encounters a Witches' Sabbath and escapes with his life, but at the cost of his horse tail. The story was said to be made up by Graham himself to placate his fearsome, but very superstitious, wife after he arrived home one night, worse the wear for drink and with his old mare's tail cropped by some village prankster. This present piece depicts Tam enjoying a riotous night at a local hostilely in the company of his friends, John Anderson and 'Rabbie' Burns.Rodney Newton - 2013

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days