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  • £53.99
  • £124.10

    One Moment in Time - Hammond

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days
  • £46.20

    ONE MOMENT IN TIME (Brass Band) - Bettis & Hammond - Fernie, Alan

    Medium/Easy

    Estimated delivery 10-14 working days

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  • £49.20

    Pop Classics (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

    Slightly reduced Brass Band instrumentation (no rep cornet, no 2nd horn, no 2nd trombone part). Includes: YMCA; A Groovy Kind of Love; Crocodile Rock; One Moment in Time.Grade: Very Easy/Easy (No.15)

    Estimated delivery 10-14 working days
  • £54.95

    WORLD WITHIN, A (Brass Band Parts) - Scott, Andy

    Brass Band parts only. 'A World Within' is a one-movement work that starts with a simple theme stated by the Soprano Cornet before an ostinato figure in 6/8 time emerges (Vibraphone, Horns and muted 2nd and 3rd Cornets) over which firstly Solo Cornet, and then both Solo Cornets (1 & 2), play a sustained melody. A shift between major and minor harmonies characterises the 'B' section, before making way for a virtuosic Flugel solo. When the Flugel leaves centre stage the front line Cornets take over, leading to a full bodied reprise of the 'B' section. The low brass bridge the gap between what is in effect the end of the first main section of the piece and the second section. The constant time shift between 3/4 and 6/8 that has been prevalent through-out 'A World Within', re-emerges towards the end of the 'slow, heavy blues' section, leading into an intricate almost fugue-like passage (Horn and Baritone leading the way). Out of this comes a short transitional bridge section that leads us back to the (transposed) original 6/8 time theme and feel, this time scored with a bold directness that leads to a powerful 2/4 time passage. The climax of 'A World Within' is heralded by one dark and dissonant chord that is repeated three times. A flashback moment occurs where the 'hymn' is stated (muted Cornets) in a bitonal harmonic world. A final statement emerges from the denseness of sound, a re-working of the initial theme (Solo Cornet), with the last work being left to Solo Eb Bass. Dur: 13:00

    Estimated delivery 10-14 working days

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  • £20.00

    WORLD WITHIN, A (Brass Band Score) - Scott, Andy

    Brass Band score only. 'A World Within' is a one-movement work that starts with a simple theme stated by the Soprano Cornet before an ostinato figure in 6/8 time emerges (Vibraphone, Horns and muted 2nd and 3rd Cornets) over which firstly Solo Cornet, and then both Solo Cornets (1 & 2), play a sustained melody. A shift between major and minor harmonies characterises the 'B' section, before making way for a virtuosic Flugel solo. When the Flugel leaves centre stage the front line Cornets take over, leading to a full bodied reprise of the 'B' section. The low brass bridge the gap between what is in effect the end of the first main section of the piece and the second section. The constant time shift between 3/4 and 6/8 that has been prevalent through-out 'A World Within', re-emerges towards the end of the 'slow, heavy blues' section, leading into an intricate almost fugue-like passage (Horn and Baritone leading the way). Out of this comes a short transitional bridge section that leads us back to the (transposed) original 6/8 time theme and feel, this time scored with a bold directness that leads to a powerful 2/4 time passage. The climax of 'A World Within' is heralded by one dark and dissonant chord that is repeated three times. A flashback moment occurs where the 'hymn' is stated (muted Cornets) in a bitonal harmonic world. A final statement emerges from the denseness of sound, a re-working of the initial theme (Solo Cornet), with the last work being left to Solo Eb Bass. Dur: 13:00

    Estimated delivery 10-14 working days

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  • £69.95

    Neverland - Christopher Bond

    "All children, except one, grow up" wrote J.M. Barrie about Peter Pan in 1911; the first line and an expression of beautiful melancholy and fantasy, coming to represent one of the best-loved children's stories of the twentieth century. 'Peter & Wendy', as the book was first released, has subsequently been transformed into adaptations for film and stage, with subsequent books based on this iconic tale. In writing this new work for brass band, the composer has taken three of the main themes from J. M. Barrie's book, and used these themes to create new musical material, forming a work in three contrasting sections. I. Journey to Neverland The opening of the work, mysterious in its style, reflects the opening chapters of the story - a leafy London street, still in the dead of night - with the music transforming quickly as it builds in texture and momentum - a Journey to Neverland through the night sky; Second Star to the Right and straight on 'til morning. "Then Peter knew that there was not a moment to lose. 'Come,' he cried imperiously, and soared out at once into the night, followed by John and Michael and Wendy. Mr & Mrs Darling and Nana rushed into the nursery too late. The birds were flown." II. The Windows that Closed The central section of the work takes its inspiration from the sense of longing throughout the book, mainly by Peter Pan, the Darling Children & The Lost Boys. Distant memories of life before Neverland, memories of the Lost Boys' mothers, and regret at what the children have missed. Peter says "Long ago, I thought like you that my mother would always keep the window open for me; so I stayed away for moons and moons and moons, and then flew back; but the window was barred, for mother had forgotten all about me, and there was another little boy sleeping in my bed." III. Aboard the Pirate Ship The final section of the work takes its inspiration from the Pirate Ship, and Peter Pan's ultimate battle with its infamous Captain Hook. "In person, he was cadaverous and blackavized, and his hair was dressed in long curls, which at a distance looked like black candles, and gave a singularly threatening expression to his handsome countenance. His eyes were the blue of the forget-me-not, and of a profound melancholy, save when he was plunging his hook into you, at which time two red spots appeared in them and lit them up horribly."

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £29.95

    Harrison's Dream (Score Only) - Graham, Peter

    At 8.00pm on the 22nd of October 1707, the Association, flagship of the Royal Navy, struck rocks off the Scilly Isles with the loss of the entire crew. Throughout the rest of the evening the remaining three ships in the fleet suffered the same fate. Only 26 of the original 1,647 crew members survived. This disaster was a direct result of an inability to calculate longitude, the most pressing scientific problem of the time. It pushed the longitude question to the forefront of the national consciousness and precipitated the Longitude Act. Parliament funded a prize of ?20,000 to anyone whose method or device would solve the dilemma. For carpenter and self-taught clockmaker John Harrison, this was the beginning of a 40 year obsession. To calculate longitude it is necessary to know the time aboard ship and at the home port or place of known longitude, at precisely the same moment. Harrison's dream was to build a clock so accurate that this calculation could be made, an audacious feat of engineering. This work reflects on aspects of this epic tale, brilliantly brought to life in Dava Sobel's book Longitude. Much of the music is mechanistic in tone and is constructed along precise mathematical and metrical lines. The heart of the work however is human - the attraction of the ?20,000 prize is often cited as Harrison's motivation. However, the realisation that countless lives depended on a solution was one which haunted Harrison. The emotional core of the music reflects on this, and in particular the evening of 22ndOctober 1707. Peter GrahamCheshireJuly 2000

    Estimated delivery 10-14 working days
  • £94.99

    Cambridgeshire Impressions - Rieks van der Velde

    In a four-part composition Rieks van der Velde takes us to the richly varied area surrounding the university city of Cambridge. The Dutch composer was especially inspired by the atmosphere of Cambridgeshire, the county which lies north ofLondon. 1. The Journey. Although on arrival the area looks peaceful and friendly, the ruggedness of its inhabitants and landscape have an unmistakable influence on the music. In the course of the tour, which starts with an Allegromovement, we are shown the vitality, energy and freshness of the Cambridgeshire countryside. Short themes, swift and sudden motifs and rhythmical patterns supported by the drive of percussion instruments give expression to this image. Thefirst part is concluded by two Calmo movements in which the music expresses how the cathedral in the city of Ely comes into sight and is gradually approached. 2. Visit to Ely Cathedral. The famous Norman cathedral church of Ely, whichwas built in 1109, has attracted tourists from all over the world apart from being a place of worship and heritage site. A cornet solo introduces the contemplative mood of the composition at this point. The mystical atmosphere of thecathedral runs through this lyrical part like a continuous thread. 3. The Pub. The thirst caused by this intensive journey makes a visit to the local pub a definite must. These "public houses", which may be open until the earlyhours of the morning, offer all kinds of entertainment. Drinks are served liberally and the atmosphere is lively. 4. The Journey Back. Time has flown: In other words, the moment of departure has come sooner than one would havewished. In a flashback which recaptures elements of the first part of the composition we say goodbye to Cambridgeshire in a fitting manner. Two scintillating final measures bring us abruptly back to the present.

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days

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