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  • £42.95

    SONGS OF THE GREAT WAR A Medley of Popular Songs 1914-1918 (Brass Band) - Wiffin, Rob

    Music of the Great War is a five year project to use music of the period to educate and engage schools, colleges, town bands, and the wider public across the UK and the world to learn in a positive way about the events, the experience of the troops involved from all sides, and how music played its part.This year, to commemorate the centenary of the Great War a specially arranged medley Songs of the Great War has been created. The medley has been arranged for bands to rehearse and eventually perform on the 11 November 2015. It brings together some of the most popular tunes played, sung and performed by the men and women of the time - in the trenches and on the various home fronts.With the support of many countries and organisations, on the 11 November the medley will be first played in New Zealand and Australia. It will ripple east across the world being performed in countries like India and Pakistan before hitting Europe and onwards to include performances in Canada and the Caribbean. This could become one of the most played pieces of music in a 24-hour period.In Britain, there will be performances across the country, including some at key events and sites involving a wide range of military and non-military personnel.The medley includes: It's a Long Way to Tipperary; Your King and Country Want You; Good Bye-ee; Oh! It's a Lovely War; Hello! Hello! Who's Your Lady Friend; Take Me Back to Dear Old Blighty; Mademoiselle from Armentieres; There's a Long, Long Trail A-winding; If You Were the Only Girl in the World; Pack Up Your Troubles (In Your Old Kit Bag); Old Soldiers Never Die/Last Post.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 working days

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  • £25.50

    Bless 'Em All - Various - Gavin Somerset

    Keeping spirits high during World War II was essential, and music played a huge part. Darrol Barry's excellent arrangement 'Keep Smiling Through' has been pleasing audiences for years and can probably be found in most brass bands libraries across the country. This new release of popular war time songs including 'Wish Me Luck, As You Wave Me Goodbye', 'We're Going To Hang Out The Washing', 'Kiss Me Goodnight Sgt. Major', 'Good Morning', 'Bless 'Em All' and the highlight of the piece, the slow, hair raising middle movement 'Apple Blossom Time', is being released to coincide with the 70th Anniversary of the Battle Of Britain. All of these songs were sung as the London population camped out in the underground stations. This arrangement will get the feet tapping as audiences sing along to the lively pieces and then sends shivers down their spines with the gorgeous 'Apple Blossom Time' featuring in the middle of the medley. This is a piece not to be missed and should belong in all bands libraries.Whilst rehearsals are suspended due to Covid-19, we are making some parts available to download FREE for home use and practice, alongside a downloadable backing track to play along to. To download the Solo Cornet part, please CLICK HERE . To download the Solo Horn part, please CLICK HERE . To download the Solo Euphonium part, please CLICK HERE . To download the playback audio to play along to, please RIGHT CLICK HERE & Save As .

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days

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  • £19.50

    In Flanders Fields - Gavin Somerset

    Many are familiar with the ever popular poem, 'In Flanders Fields' written by Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae during the first World War. The poem tells of the fields strewn with crosses where fallen soldiers had been laid to rest. The opening stanza states 'In Flanders fields the poppies blow, Between the crosses, row on row,'. These words form the foundation on which this music was composed. The music pulls on the varying emotions one might feel if you journeyed through the fields and will leave your audience in little doubt of the sadness, bravery and honour, which those who fell in the Great War endured. Remembrance Day is a key event for almost every Brass Band. With the date approaching and little sign of full bands being able to gather to mark the occasion, we have made available a downloadable backing track (with click track) which bands can use to put together a 'virtual' performance of this moving piece. If bands cannot be there in person, they'll most certainly be there in spirit during these difficult times. To download the backing track to play along to, please RIGHT CLICK HERE & Save As . Also Available for Wind Band

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days

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  • £30.00

    Russian Rag - George L Cobb, Sandy Coffin

    Interpolating the world famous"Prelude" by RachmaninoffCommissioned by John Wallace, this arrangement of Russian Rag has been crafted by Sandy Coffin through close listening of the available recordings of the Harlem Hellfighters Band. Sandy had been heavily involved with the Historic Brass Society symposium 2017 held in New York and assisted John with his research on this fascinating band and the style of music it generated.Eye-witness accounts refer to the 369th band ‘dancing’ rather than ‘marching’. Above all, in modern performance, finding a ‘dancing beat’ is crucial to a successful performance of this Ragtime march in order to do justice to the great pioneering work of James Reese Europe. Note the cheeky virtuosity and rubato!Look and Listen (courtesy of Tullis Russell Mills Band):Background to the Harlem HellfightersThe US Army 369th Regiment, made up largely of African-Americans from New York, became known as the Harlem Hellfighters because of the heroic reputation which accrued to them during the actions they engaged in during the First World War in Europe.James Reese Europe was one of the most active African-American composer/musical directors in the pre-war American music scene. The legendary Harlem Hellfighters Band, which he assembled in 1917 from African-American and Puerto Rican musicians, came at an important transitional point in musical history. A new form of music called jazz was emerging from Ragtime and the performing style of Europe’s band was immersed in the flow of this new direction.Europe’s Harlem Hellfighters influenced and inspired everyone who heard them, including the welcoming crowd when they disembarked in France, bowled over by their swinging rendition of La Marseillaise. Reese Europe became a war hero, commanding a machine-gun unit as well as the band.On return from War in 1919 the band led a ticker-tape parade along Fifth Avenue in New York and soon made about 30 shellac recordings. These recordings display some of the fingerprints of their performing style: ragging, improvising, muting, wailing, smearing (their word for glissando) – and from the evidence of their recordings they took the printed page as a blueprint for individuality.In May 1919 during the Hellfighters’ triumphant coast-to-coast tour after their return, James Reese Europe was tragically murdered, bringing to premature close, at the age of 39, the work of a great musical innovator.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days
  • £30.00

    That Moaning Trombone - Carl D Bethel, Sandy Coffin

    Comic March One-StepCommissioned by John Wallace, this arrangement of That Moaning Trombone has been crafted by Sandy Coffin through close listening of the available recordings of the Harlem Hellfighters Band. Sandy had been heavily involved with the Historic Brass Society symposium 2017 held in New York and assisted John with his research on this fascinating band and the style of music it generated.Eye-witness accounts refer to the 369th band ‘dancing’ rather than ‘marching’. Above all, in modern performance, finding a ‘dancing beat’ is crucial to a successful performance of this Ragtime march in order to do justice to the great pioneering work of James Reese Europe.Note the the reckless abandon with which glissando, at that time a novel effect, is used!Look and Listen (courtesy of the Tullis Russell Mills Band):Background to the Harlem HellfightersThe US Army 369th Regiment, made up largely of African-Americans from New York, became known as the Harlem Hellfighters because of the heroic reputation which accrued to them during the actions they engaged in during the First World War in Europe.James Reese Europe was one of the most active African-American composer/musical directors in the pre-war American music scene. The legendary Harlem Hellfighters Band, which he assembled in 1917 from African-American and Puerto Rican musicians, came at an important transitional point in musical history. A new form of music called jazz was emerging from Ragtime and the performing style of Europe’s band was immersed in the flow of this new direction.Europe’s Harlem Hellfighters influenced and inspired everyone who heard them, including the welcoming crowd when they disembarked in France, bowled over by their swinging rendition of La Marseillaise. Reese Europe became a war hero, commanding a machine-gun unit as well as the band.On return from War in 1919 the band led a ticker-tape parade along Fifth Avenue in New York and soon made about 30 shellac recordings. These recordings display some of the fingerprints of their performing style: ragging, improvising, muting, wailing, smearing (their word for glissando) – and from the evidence of their recordings they took the printed page as a blueprint for individuality.In May 1919 during the Hellfighters’ triumphant coast-to-coast tour after their return, James Reese Europe was tragically murdered, bringing to premature close, at the age of 39, the work of a great musical innovator.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days
  • £30.00

    The St Louis Blues - Sandy Coffin, W C Handy

    Two-Step MarchCommissioned by John Wallace, this arrangement of The St Louis Blues has been crafted by Sandy Coffin through close listening of the available recordings of the Harlem Hellfighters Band. Sandy had been heavily involved with the Historic Brass Society symposium 2017 held in New York and assisted John with his research on this fascinating band and the style of music it generated.Eye-witness accounts refer to the 369th band ‘dancing’ rather than ‘marching’. Above all, in modern performance, finding a ‘dancing beat’ is crucial to a successful performance of this Ragtime march in order to do justice to the great pioneering work of James Reese Europe.Note the flutter-tonguing and use of muting, the counter-melody in soprano cornet, and the wilder and yet wilder nature of each repetition of the Chorus.Look and Listen:Background to the Harlem HellfightersThe US Army 369th Regiment, made up largely of African-Americans from New York, became known as the Harlem Hellfighters because of the heroic reputation which accrued to them during the actions they engaged in during the First World War in Europe.James Reese Europe was one of the most active African-American composer/musical directors in the pre-war American music scene. The legendary Harlem Hellfighters Band, which he assembled in 1917 from African-American and Puerto Rican musicians, came at an important transitional point in musical history. A new form of music called jazz was emerging from Ragtime and the performing style of Europe’s band was immersed in the flow of this new direction.Europe’s Harlem Hellfighters influenced and inspired everyone who heard them, including the welcoming crowd when they disembarked in France, bowled over by their swinging rendition of La Marseillaise. Reese Europe became a war hero, commanding a machine-gun unit as well as the band.On return from War in 1919 the band led a ticker-tape parade along Fifth Avenue in New York and soon made about 30 shellac recordings. These recordings display some of the fingerprints of their performing style: ragging, improvising, muting, wailing, smearing (their word for glissando) – and from the evidence of their recordings they took the printed page as a blueprint for individuality.In May 1919 during the Hellfighters’ triumphant coast-to-coast tour after their return, James Reese Europe was tragically murdered, bringing to premature close, at the age of 39, the work of a great musical innovator.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days
  • £69.95

    Lost Village of Imber, The - Christopher Bond

    The village of Imber on Salisbury Plain had been inhabited for over one thousand years when it was evacuated in 1943 to make way for military training in the Second World War. At the time, with preparations for the Allied invasion of Europe underway, most villagers put up no resistance, despite being upset, with the belief that they'd return once the war had concluded. To this day, Imber and its surrounding land remain a military training ground. The villagers never returned, and just the shell of what was once a community remains. Structured in three movements, it is on this very real story that the work is based, setting out the series of events of 1943 in chronological order. The first movement, On Imber Downe, portrays a sense of jollity and cohesiveness - a community of individuals living and working together before news of the evacuation had broken. Sounds of the village are heard throughout, not least in a series of percussive effects - the anvil of the blacksmith; the cowbell of the cattle and the bells of the church. The second movement, The Church of St. Giles, begins mysteriously and this sonorous, atmospheric opening depicts Imber in its desolate state and the apprehension of residents as they learn they have to leave their homes. Amidst this is the Church, a symbol of hope for villagers who one day wish to return, portrayed with a sweeping melodic passage before the music returns to the apprehension of villagers facing eviction around their sadness at losing their rural way of life. In complete contrast, the third movement, Imemerie Aeternum, portrays the arrival of the military, complete with the sounds of the ammunition, firing and tanks - sounds which were all too familiar to those living in the surround areas. To close, the Church of St. Giles theme returns in a triumphant style, representing the idea that the church has always been, even to this day, a beacon of hope for the villagers and local community - both the centrepiece and pinnacle of a very real story. The work was commissioned by Bratton Silver Band in celebration of the band's 160th Anniversary, with funding from the Arts Council National Lottery Project Grants Fund and the Brass Bands England Norman Jones Trust Fund.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £34.95

    Peacemakers - Dan Price

    Peacemakers was composed for Robert Childs and the Grimethorpe Colliery Band. It received its world premiere on November 17th 2014 at The Sage and concluded their winning ‘Brass in Concert' program, ‘Lest We Forget'.As well as commemorating the centenary of World War I, 2014 also marked the 75th Anniversary of the outbreak of Word War II. Dan Price's Peacemakers pays tribute to those who fought, and uses two contrasting musical ideas as its basis. The motifs and material for the first theme take inspiration from Morse code patterns, and as the work nears a triumphant close the allied forces of World War II are remembered through the words of British Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill broadcast on 20th August 1940. This speech can be narrated. Alternatively, a free audio download is available from the downloads section of this site.Peacemakers has been recorded by Grimethorpe Colliery Band on their CD 'Grimethorpe Entertain' available to buy here.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £38.00

    Silent Night

    One of the most well-known and loved Christmas carols, Silent Night is a carol everyone knows. In this brass band arrangement, audiences will love the warm chords and gorgeous styling of this brass band music.Composed in 1818 by Franz Xaver Gruber, Silent NIght has been recorded and sung by many singers and music groups, including the popular Bing Crosby version in 1935 and the 1990 version by Sinead O'Connor.Stille Nacht (Silent Night) was first performed in 1818 at a church in the Austrian town of Oberndorf on Christmas Eve. The words to Silent Night had been written as a poem in 1816 by Father Joseph Mohr. On the Christmas Eve of 1818, Mohr showed his poem to Gruber, who asked him to compose a melody for it for that night's mass. The church in which they were in was evetually destroyed by continual flooding and the new chapel was named after the carol (Silent Night Chapel).Sadly, the original manuscript has been lost over the years, so Mohr's contribution was largely forgotten about. Indeed, many thought that Beethoven, Haydn or Mozart had a hand in it. However, a manuscript tuned up in 1995 that showed Mohr's handwriting, which was dated circa 1820. It stated the true author of the words to be Mohr. Silent Night remains one of the most popular carols every written and has been translated into over 300 languages and featured as the subject of many films. It has been arranged many times and was even sung on the battlefield during World War 1 during the CHristmas truce.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £24.95

    Silent Night - Franz Gruber - Darius Battiwalla

    In 1816, a Roman Catholic priest called Josef Mohr composed a short six-stanza poem for his Christmas service which he entitled Stille Nacht. On Christmas Eve in 1818 the church organ at St Nicholas Church, Oberndorf had broken down and he happened to show his organist and choirmaster Franz Gruber the poem he had written, wondering if it could be set to music which would not require the organ.Gruber spent that afternoon composing, what would become the most loved Christmas carol of all time. It was first performed that very Christmas Eve, with the church choir and Gruber accompanying them on guitar.Although Gruber's original melody has altered little since 1818, it was originally performed as a sprightly 6/8 dance. Over the years the melody has been slowed down and we now recognise it most commonly as a gentle, meditative lullaby.The song's lyrics have been translated into around 140 different languages and it has been used extensively, in countless guises all over the world.Perhaps its most poignant use however was during the First World War Christmas Truce in 1914, where it was sung simultaneously by French, English and German troops stationed on the front line, being the only carol they all new.This new arrangement for brass band yet again breathes new life into this timeless classic. Lush harmonies and its reflective texture will make this a welcome addition to any festive program.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days