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  • £19.50

    In The Pines - Traditional - Max Stannard

    Whilst the song may not be familiar with some, this traditional American folk song is believed to date back to the 1870’s. With various other titles including ‘Where Did You Sleep Last Night?’ and ‘Black Girl’, this work has been recorded by numerous artists over the years and was in 1993, introduced to a new generation when it was performed by the US band, Nirvana. Max Stannard’s haunting setting brings your audience in with the haunting melody before shifting gears into a great jazz-waltz section. Featuring several soloists, this is a great entertainment items and a good showcase for concerts and contests.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £39.99 £39.99
    Buy from Marcato Brass

    Dardanella | Bernard & Black arr. Dario Salvi

    'Oh Sweet Dardanella, I love your harem eyes. I'm a lucky fellow, to capture such a prize'Dardanella was written in 1919 and became one of the most popular songs of the 1920's selling 13 million copies, going on to become a huge jazz standard covered by the likes of Louis Armstrong and Bing Crosby amongst others.This arrangement for Brass Band by Dario Salvi takes us back to the most famous version of 1920 sung by Vernon Dalhart and Gladys Rice, where the opening calls to mind the sounds of a fairground.Dario's arrangement moves between styles with an almost clockwork sound at one point changing to laid back swing beat at another, all supporting this cheerful melody. An excellent programme filler.Instrumentation:Soprano, Solo, Repiano, 2nd and 3rd CornetsFlugelhornSolo, 1st and 2nd Tenor Horns1st and 2nd Baritone1st, 2nd and Bass TromboneSolo and 2nd EuphoniumEb and Bb BassesPercussion parts:Drum KitXylophoneISMN: 979-0-708127-87-1

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  • £69.95

    In League with Extraordinary Gentlemen (Euphonium Solo with Brass Band) - Graham, Peter

    Concerto for EuphoniumIn League with Extraordinary Gentlemen combines two of composer Peter Graham's life interests - composition and 19th century popular fiction. Each of the concerto’s three movements takes its musical inspiration from extraordinary characters who have transcended the original genre and have subsequently found mass audiences through film, television and comic book adaptations.The first movement follows a traditional sonata form outline with one slight modification. The order of themes in the recapitulation is reversed, mirroring a plot climax in the H.G. Wells novella The Time Machine (where the protagonist, known only as The Time Traveller, puts his machine into reverse bringing the story back full circle).The Adventure of the Final Problem is the title of a short story published in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle. This is an account of the great detective’s final struggle with his long-time adversary Professor Moriarty at the Reichenbach Falls in Switzerland. The music takes the form of a slowed down l?ndler (a Swiss/Austrian folk dance) and various acoustic and electronic echo effects call to mind the alpine landscape. The final bars pose a question paralleling that of Conan Doyle in the story – have we really seen the last of Sherlock Holmes?The final movement, The Great Race, (available separately) follows Phileas Fogg on the last stage of his epic journey “Around the World in Eighty Days” (from the novel by Jules Verne). The moto perpetuo nature of the music gives full rein to the soloist’s technical virtuosity. As the work draws to a conclusion, the frantic scramble by Fogg to meet his deadline at the Reform Club in Pall Mall, London, is echoed by the soloist’s increasingly demanding ascending figuration, set against the background of Big Ben clock chimes.In League with Extraordinary Gentlemen was first performed in the brass band version by David Thornton and the Black Dyke Band, conductor Nicholas Childs, at the RNCM Concert Hall Manchester on January 30, 2009.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £69.95

    IN LEAGUE WITH EXTRAORDINARY GENTLEMEN (Concerto for Euphonium) - Peter Graham

    In League with Extraordinary Gentlemen combines two of composer Peter Graham's life interests - composition and 19th century popular fiction. Each of the concertos three movements takes its musical inspiration from extraordinary characters who have transcended the original genre and have subsequently found mass audiences through film, television and comic book adaptations. The first movement follows a traditional sonata form outline with one slight modification. The order of themes in the recapitulation is reversed, mirroring a plot climax in the H.G. Wells novella The Time Machine (where the protagonist, known only as The Time Traveller, puts his machine into reverse bringing the story back full circle). The Adventure of the Final Problem is the title of a short story published in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle. This is an account of the great detectives final struggle with his long-time adversary Professor Moriarty at the Reichenbach Falls in Switzerland. The music takes the form of a slowed down lndler (a Swiss/Austrian folk dance) and various acoustic and electronic echo effects call to mind the alpine landscape. The final bars pose a question paralleling that of Conan Doyle in the story have we really seen the last of Sherlock Holmes?The final movement, The Great Race, (available separately) follows Phileas Fogg on the last stage of his epic journey Around the World in Eighty Days (from the novel by Jules Verne). The moto perpetuo nature of the music gives full rein to the soloists technical virtuosity. As the work draws to a conclusion, the frantic scramble by Fogg to meet his deadline at the Reform Club in Pall Mall, London, is echoed by the soloists increasingly demanding ascending figuration, set against the background of Big Ben clock chimes.In League with Extraordinary Gentlemen was first performed in the brass band version by David Thornton and the Black Dyke Band, conductor Nicholas Childs, at the RNCM Concert Hall Manchester on January 30, 2009. Available MultiMedia Files

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £49.95

    Blaze - Phil Lawrence

    Cornet/trumpet sounds have been changing for some years; they are becoming heavier, more robust, slower vibratos. The dynamic level now pushed out by your average solo cornet is 30% more than it was some 35/40 years ago. This, is mainly due to the bore size of instruments and mouthpiece sizes (as in bigger), and, demands of modern day works for band on the player/soloist, and of course a greater demand of styles on the player, and progressive teaching methods. The technical styles in Blaze are about these changes.In Blaze I have clearly blended symphonic blowing styles of the trumpet plus the virtuosic attributes of today's modern cornet player. Many solo cornets parts (more past than present) in band are often clearly defined between low A and top C above the stave. Orchestral trumpet players need a working range of another fourth at either end of this defined range; I have incorporated this range into the concerto. The low register is much explored, and the average tessitura throughout is constantly varied below and above the stave from pedal Eb to super F# opt. The ideology of this blend of course makes sense as the original dedication is to Rod Franks, LSO, and of course blending with that is Rod's history at Black Dyke Mills Band.The concerto is ten minutes long and in one movement comprising of four sections and one solo cadenza, with one section only appearing once, an episode. This singular section was a revised addition and dedicated to Richard Marshall who gave the first premier in New Zealand in June 2003. For the purists the form is thus, A, B, A (vari), C (episode). D (slow movement), E (3/8 episode 1), D (vari), E, (episode 2). A (last move), B, A (developed) = (coda finale).The compositional style? Well, I hope quintessentially, 21st C English with an element of nostalgia (modal/old English). There are some hints at jazz playing styles and rhumba, but romantic English I would say, and especially the slow movement.Blaze is also very bold; the title itself reflects this, full of bravura and constant amazement, offering little respite for the soloist and sapping much stamina. The opening statement from the soloist is without accompaniment; just as a matador stands alone in the ring for the first few seconds, and looks at the mass crowd in defiance, he thinks, "you are here to see me die", so the soloist stares the audience back in the face, and opens with the richest, largest sound (not loudest) one can muster, thus throwing the gauntlet down to the ears of all who might disbelieve what they are about to encounter, a gladiatorial cornet, a Blaze from the stage.For the soloist, it is a non-stop Blaze of sound, electrifying technique, sage-like musicianship, super-human stamina and sheer matador-like bravura with 10th Dan mastery of over-all control, a test beyond the reasonable. And for the audience? Of course, a BLAZE never to be forgotten. Phil LawrenceThis work can be heard performed by cornet soloist Richard Marshall & the Grimethorpe Colliery Band on their award winning album entitled 'BLAZE'

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £69.95

    Neverland

    "All children, except one, grow up" wrote J.M. Barrie about Peter Pan in 1911; the first line and an expression of beautiful melancholy and fantasy, coming to represent one of the best-loved children's stories of the twentieth century. 'Peter & Wendy', as the book was first released, has subsequently been transformed into adaptations for film and stage, with subsequent books based on this iconic tale. In writing this new work for brass band, the composer has taken three of the main themes from J. M. Barrie's book, and used these themes to create new musical material, forming a work in three contrasting sections.I. Journey to NeverlandThe opening of the work, mysterious in its style, reflects the opening chapters of the story - a leafy London street, still in the dead of night - with the music transforming quickly as it builds in texture and momentum - a Journey to Neverland through the night sky; Second Star to the Right and straight on 'til morning. "Then Peter knew that there was not a moment to lose. 'Come,' he cried imperiously, and soared out at once into the night, followed by John and Michael and Wendy. Mr & Mrs Darling and Nana rushed into the nursery too late. The birds were flown."II. The Windows that ClosedThe central section of the work takes its inspiration from the sense of longing throughout the book, mainly by Peter Pan, the Darling Children & The Lost Boys. Distant memories of life before Neverland, memories of the Lost Boys' mothers, and regret at what the children have missed. Peter says "Long ago, I thought like you that my mother would always keep the window open for me; so I stayed away for moons and moons and moons, and then flew back; but the window was barred, for mother had forgotten all about me, and there was another little boy sleeping in my bed."III. Aboard the Pirate ShipThe final section of the work takes its inspiration from the Pirate Ship, and Peter Pan's ultimate battle with its infamous Captain Hook. "In person, he was cadaverous and blackavized, and his hair was dressed in long curls, which at a distance looked like black candles, and gave a singularly threatening expression to his handsome countenance. His eyes were the blue of the forget-me-not, and of a profound melancholy, save when he was plunging his hook into you, at which time two red spots appeared in them and lit them up horribly."

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £24.95

    Mists on the River Wear - Dan Price

    Mists On The River Wear is a ‘song and dance' for solo tuba. It was commissioned in 2010 by the Black Dyke Band's solo Eb Bass player and international tuba star Joseph Cook.The SongThe work opens with unaccompanied tuba announcing a three note motif which is the basis for the entire work. The accompaniment enters in broken cluster chords which emulate the mist gliding on the river at early morning. The mist clears and the river motif appears on tenor horns whilst the tuba melody flows above.Geographically, the River Wear passes past Durham Cathedral and Durham Castle as it works its way through the city and to reflect this musically there is an element of a renaissance dance in the centre of this movement in an attempt to capture the historic and physically dominating presence of these buildings within the city.As the movement draws to a close there is a passage of light scoring which enables the soloist to demonstrate their ability at performing multi-phonics, a haunting sound which is eventually engulfed by the sound of the river broadening out as it travels on its journey.The DanceIn contrast to the lyrical first movement, this second movement showcases the versatility of the instrument and the agility of the soloist in a lively dance.The dance begins in compound time and echoes the style of an English jig which represents the energetic life you find in the university city of Durham. There is a deliberate quote written into the theme of the jig which comes from the 1st Movement of Ralph Vaughan-Williams' Concerto for Bass Tuba, which Joseph and the composer share a fondness towards.A brief return to the riverside opening material of the piece quickly leads us into a pseudo "Jazz" waltz, where cross rhythms between soloist and accompaniment gives the melody a sense of disjointedness and ambiguity. However, the music soon flows back into a reprise of the jig with a closing cadenza section that brings Mists On The River Wear to a close.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days