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  • £74.95

    An Age of Kings (Mezzo-Soprano Solo with Brass Band and optional choir - Score and Parts) - Gregson, Edward

    The origins of this work date back to 1988, when I was commissioned by the Royal Shakespeare Company to write the music for The Plantagenets trilogy, directed by Adrian Noble in Stratford-upon-Avon. These plays take us from the death of Henry V to the death of Richard III. Later, in 1991, I wrote the music for Henry IV parts 1 and 2, again in Stratford. All of these plays are concerned with the struggle for the throne, and they portray one of the most turbulent periods in the history of the British monarchy.Much of the music used in these productions was adapted into two large symphonic suites for wind band – The Sword and the Crown (1991) and The Kings Go Forth (1996). An Age of Kings is a new version for brass band incorporating music from both the symphonic suites for wind band. It was specially composed for a recording made by the Black Dyke Band, conducted by Nicholas Childs, in 2004.An Age of Kings is music on a large-scale canvas, scored for augmented brass band, with the addition of harp, piano, mezzo-soprano solo, male chorus, as well as two off-stage trumpets. The music is also organized on a large-scale structure, in three movements, which play without a break – “Church and State”, “At the Welsh Court”, and “Battle Music and Hymn of Thanksgiving”.The first movement, “Church and State”, opens with a brief fanfare for two antiphonal trumpets (off-stage), but this only acts as a preface to a Requiem aeternam (the death of Henry V) before changing mood to the English army on the march to France; this subsides into a French victory march, but with the English army music returning in counterpoint. A brief reminder of the Requiem music leads to the triumphal music for Richard Plantagenet, Duke of York, father of Edward IV and Richard III (the opening fanfare transformed). However, the mood changes dramatically once again, with the horrors of war being portrayed in the darkly-drawn Dies Irae and Dance of Death, leading to the final section of the first movement, a funeral march for Henry VI.The second movement, “At the Welsh Court”, takes music from the Welsh Court in Henry IV part 1 with a simple Welsh folk tune sung by mezzo-soprano to the inevitable accompaniment of a harp. This love song is interrupted by distant fanfares, forewarning of battles to come. However, the folk song returns with variation in the musical fabric. The movement ends as it began with off-stage horn and gentle percussion.The final movement, “Battle Music and Hymn of Thanksgiving“, starts with two sets of antiphonally placed timpani, drums and tam-tam, portraying the ‘war machine’ and savagery of battle. Trumpet fanfares and horn calls herald an heroic battle theme which, by the end of the movement, transforms itself into a triumphant hymn for Henry IV’s defeat of the rebellious forces.- Edward GregsonDuration - 22'00"Optional TTBB available separately.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £74.95

    Eden - John Pickard

    This work was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the final of the 2005 Besson National Brass Band Championship, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London.The score is prefaced by the final lines from Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost (completed in 1663), in which Adam and Eve, expelled from Paradise, make their uncertain way into the outside world:“…The world was all before them, where to chooseTheir place of rest, and providence their guide:They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow,Through Eden took their solitary way.”My work is in three linked sections. In the first, the characters of Adam, Eve and the serpent guarding the Tree of Knowledge are respectively represented by solo euphonium, cornet and trombone. The music opens in an idyllic and tranquil mood and leads into a duet between euphonium and cornet. Throughout this passage the prevailing mood darkens, though the soloists seem to remain oblivious to the increasingly fraught atmosphere. A whip-crack announces the malevolent appearance of the solo trombone who proceeds to engage the solo cornet in a sinister dialogue.The second section interprets the Eden story as a modern metaphor for the havoc mankind has inflicted upon the world, exploiting and abusing its resources in the pursuit of wealth. Though certainly intended here as a comment on the present-day, it is by no means a new idea: Milton himself had an almost prescient awareness of it in Book I of his poem, where men, led on by Mammon:“…Ransacked the centre and with impious handsRifled the bowels of their mother earthFor treasures better hid. Soon had his crewOpened into the hill a spacious woundAnd digged out ribs of gold.”So this section is fast and violent, at times almost manic in its destructive energy. At length a furious climax subsides and a tolling bell ushers in the third and final section.This final part is slow, beginning with an intense lament featuring solos for tenor-horn, fl?gel-horn and repiano cornet and joined later by solo baritone, soprano cornet, Eb-bass and Bb-bass.At one stage in the planning of the work it seemed likely that the music would end here – in despair. Then, mid-way through writing it, I visited the extraordinary Eden Project in Cornwall. Here, in a disused quarry – a huge man-made wound in the earth – immense biomes, containing an abundance of plant species from every region of the globe, together with an inspirational education programme, perhaps offer a small ray of hope for the future. This is the image behind the work’s conclusion and the optimism it aims to express is real enough, though it is hard-won and challenged to the last.John Pickard 2005

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £74.95

    Eden - Score & Parts - John Pickard

    This work was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the final of the 2005 Besson National Brass Band Championship, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London.The score is prefaced by the final lines from Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost (completed in 1663), in which Adam and Eve, expelled from Paradise, make their uncertain way into the outside world:“…The world was all before them, where to chooseTheir place of rest, and providence their guide:They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow,Through Eden took their solitary way.”My work is in three linked sections. In the first, the characters of Adam, Eve and the serpent guarding the Tree of Knowledge are respectively represented by solo euphonium, cornet and trombone. The music opens in an idyllic and tranquil mood and leads into a duet between euphonium and cornet. Throughout this passage the prevailing mood darkens, though the soloists seem to remain oblivious to the increasingly fraught atmosphere. A whip-crack announces the malevolent appearance of the solo trombone who proceeds to engage the solo cornet in a sinister dialogue.The second section interprets the Eden story as a modern metaphor for the havoc mankind has inflicted upon the world, exploiting and abusing its resources in the pursuit of wealth. Though certainly intended here as a comment on the present-day, it is by no means a new idea: Milton himself had an almost prescient awareness of it in Book I of his poem, where men, led on by Mammon:“…Ransacked the centre and with impious handsRifled the bowels of their mother earthFor treasures better hid. Soon had his crewOpened into the hill a spacious woundAnd digged out ribs of gold.”So this section is fast and violent, at times almost manic in its destructive energy. At length a furious climax subsides and a tolling bell ushers in the third and final section.This final part is slow, beginning with an intense lament featuring solos for tenor-horn, fl?gel-horn and repiano cornet and joined later by solo baritone, soprano cornet, Eb-bass and Bb-bass.At one stage in the planning of the work it seemed likely that the music would end here – in despair. Then, mid-way through writing it, I visited the extraordinary Eden Project in Cornwall. Here, in a disused quarry – a huge man-made wound in the earth – immense biomes, containing an abundance of plant species from every region of the globe, together with an inspirational education programme, perhaps offer a small ray of hope for the future. This is the image behind the work’s conclusion and the optimism it aims to express is real enough, though it is hard-won and challenged to the last.John Pickard 2005

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £64.95

    Suite from Stabat Mater - Karl Jenkins - Andrew Wainwright / Robert Childs

    The World premiere performance of Karl Jenkins' Stabat Mater took place on March 15th 2008 in Liverpool's Anglican Cathedral, performed by the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra and Choir conducted by the composer.Stabat Mater is a 13th Century Roman Catholic poem attributed to Jacopone da Todi. Its title is an abbreviation of the first line, Stabat mater dolorosa (‘The sorrowful mother was standing') This text, one of the most powerful and immediate of medieval poems, meditates on the suffering of Mary, Jesus Christ's mother, during his crucifixion.It has been set to music by many composers, among them Haydn, Dvor?k, Vivaldi, Rossini, Pergolesi, Gounod, Penderecki, Poulenc Szymanowski, Alessandro Scarlatti, Domenico Scarlatti and Verdi.Here we have three movements from Karl's setting of Stabat Mater to form a wonderful suite for brass band;ISancta Mater IICantus LacrimosusIIIParadisi GloriaMovements I and III feature antiphonal writing for cornets (group A and group B) whilst movement II opens with a quartet playing together at the side of the stage, before taking positions at the front of the stage.Performance layout based on traditional band formation: Flugel and horns should sit in the solo cornets seats, basses should sit in the horn seats, euphonium and baritones remain why they usually are. Trombones should stand a central position behind the basses and in front of percussion whilst cornets (divided as indicated on the score) take standing positions, one group behind the horns and the second group behind the baritones and euphoniums.This suite can be augmented with the inclusion of the euphonium solo Lament from Stabat Mater and the cornet solo / duet Ave Verum from Stabat Mater. If using one of these it should be played following Cantus Lacrimosus. If using both Lament should be played after Sancta Mater and Ave Verum after the Cantus Lacrimosus. All of this music can be heard performed by Cory Band conducted by Robert Childs on the Doyen CD ‘Cory in Concert - Volume II'

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £69.95

    Revelation - Score and Parts - Philip Wilby

    Symphony for Double Brass on a theme of Purcell 1995 marked the tercentenary of Purcell’s death, and my new score Revelation has been written as a tribute to his music and the ornate and confident spirit of his age. There are five major sections: 1 Prologue 2 Variations on a ground bass I 3 Fugue 4 Variations on a ground bass II 5 Epilogue and Resurrection The score uses many features of the Baroque Concerto Grosso, and arranges players in two equal groups from which soloists emerge to play in a variety ofvirtuoso ensembles. It quotes freely from Purcell’s own piece Three Parts on a Ground in which he has composed a brilliant sequence of variations over a repeating six-note bass figure. This original motif can be heard most clearly beneath the duet for Cornet 5 and Soprano at the beginning of the 2nd section. There is, of course, a religious dimension to Revelation as the title suggests, and the score is prefaced by lines by the 17th century poet John Donne. His Holy Sonnet paraphrases the Book of Revelation in which the dead are raised at the sounds of the last trumpet. Donne’s trumpets are themselves placed stereophonically “. . . At the round Earth’s imagined corners” and it is this feature that today’s players represent as they move around the performing area. Their final apocalyptic fanfares can be heard at the close of the score, as Purcell’s music re-enters in a lasting tribute to England’s first composer of genius. Philip Wilby September 1995 At the round Earth imagined corners, blow your trumpets, angels, and arise, arise from death, you numberless infinities Of souls, and to your scattered bodies go. All whom the flood did, and fire shall o ‘erthrow All whom war, dearth, age, agues, tyrannies, Despair, law, chance hath slain, and you whose eyes Shall Behold God, and never taste death woe. John Donne after Revelation Ch. 11 v.15

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    Revelation - Score Only - Philip Wilby

    Symphony for Double Brass on a theme of Purcell 1995 marked the tercentenary of Purcell’s death, and my new score Revelation has been written as a tribute to his music and the ornate and confident spirit of his age. There are five major sections: 1 Prologue 2 Variations on a ground bass I 3 Fugue 4 Variations on a ground bass II 5 Epilogue and Resurrection The score uses many features of the Baroque Concerto Grosso, and arranges players in two equal groups from which soloists emerge to play in a variety ofvirtuoso ensembles. It quotes freely from Purcell’s own piece Three Parts on a Ground in which he has composed a brilliant sequence of variations over a repeating six-note bass figure. This original motif can be heard most clearly beneath the duet for Cornet 5 and Soprano at the beginning of the 2nd section. There is, of course, a religious dimension to Revelation as the title suggests, and the score is prefaced by lines by the 17th century poet John Donne. His Holy Sonnet paraphrases the Book of Revelation in which the dead are raised at the sounds of the last trumpet. Donne’s trumpets are themselves placed stereophonically “. . . At the round Earth’s imagined corners” and it is this feature that today’s players represent as they move around the performing area. Their final apocalyptic fanfares can be heard at the close of the score, as Purcell’s music re-enters in a lasting tribute to England’s first composer of genius. Philip Wilby September 1995 At the round Earth imagined corners, blow your trumpets, angels, and arise, arise from death, you numberless infinities Of souls, and to your scattered bodies go. All whom the flood did, and fire shall o ‘erthrow All whom war, dearth, age, agues, tyrannies, Despair, law, chance hath slain, and you whose eyes Shall Behold God, and never taste death woe. John Donne after Revelation Ch. 11 v.15

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £115.80

    Festive Fireworks - Fredrick Schjelderup

    "Festive Fireworks" is written in three movements: I. Festivitas, II. Fantasia & III. Fireworks.The piece is based on two different tunes, both presented in the first movement, "Festivitas".II. Fantasia is written as a calm fantasy on the two themes. It includes melodic lines, percussion effects and finish off with cadenza's for Solo Cornet, Solo Horn, Euphonium and Eb Bass.III. Fireworks is a quick movement with lots of energy combined with technique and melodic lines. Elements of the first and second movement is presented and mixed together for a great finale.To the conductor:"I. Festivitas" can also be used as a concert opener or finale and has two different endings for concert use or contests (by using all the three movements).

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £39.99 £39.99
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    Dardanella | Bernard & Black arr. Dario Salvi

    'Oh Sweet Dardanella, I love your harem eyes. I'm a lucky fellow, to capture such a prize'Dardanella was written in 1919 and became one of the most popular songs of the 1920's selling 13 million copies, going on to become a huge jazz standard covered by the likes of Louis Armstrong and Bing Crosby amongst others.This arrangement for Brass Band by Dario Salvi takes us back to the most famous version of 1920 sung by Vernon Dalhart and Gladys Rice, where the opening calls to mind the sounds of a fairground.Dario's arrangement moves between styles with an almost clockwork sound at one point changing to laid back swing beat at another, all supporting this cheerful melody. An excellent programme filler.

  • £34.95

    Dear Old Blighty - Dan Price - -

    Commissioned in 2014 by the Flowers Band and premiered at the Cheltenham Music Festival in the same year, Dear Old Blighty is a creative arrangement of songs popular in 1914 and of those released during the World War I period. These songs were used to help boost morale both at home and in the trenches being performed by the popular singers of the day. Although not patriotic songs in the strictest sense they are commonly described as ‘the songs that won the war’.The selection includes; There’s a Long Long Trail, It’s a Long Way to Tipperary, Oh! It’s a Lovely War, I Wonder Who’s Kissing Her Now?, Pack up Your Troubles in Your Old Kit Bag, Daisy Bell, and Keep the Home Fires Burning, all cleverly tailored together in the composers recognisably distinctive style.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £24.95

    Idyll on an Irish Folk Hymn - Ralph E. Pearce - -

    Idyll on an Irish Folk Hymn was originally written for a concert of Irish music given by the Phoenix-based Salt River Brass. It was made at the request of a close friend of the composer, whose favourite melody this is. I was impressed by the treatment given to this beautiful tune, and when appearing as guest soloist with Salt River Brass, I asked Ralph to rearrange his setting as a cornet solo.Although the origin of the tune is not known, it is most often associated with hymn Lord of all hopefulness, with words by Jan Struther (1901-1953). It is quite often sung at wedding services, immediately after the signing of the register. It speaks of the desire that God goes with the couple into the future, helping them to fulfil their vows.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days