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  • £25.50

    Bless 'Em All - Various - Gavin Somerset

    Keeping spirits high during World War II was essential, and music played a huge part. Darrol Barry's excellent arrangement 'Keep Smiling Through' has been pleasing audiences for years and can probably be found in most brass bands libraries across the country. This new release of popular war time songs including 'Wish Me Luck, As You Wave Me Goodbye', 'We're Going To Hang Out The Washing', 'Kiss Me Goodnight Sgt. Major', 'Good Morning', 'Bless 'Em All' and the highlight of the piece, the slow, hair raising middle movement 'Apple Blossom Time', is being released to coincide with the 70th Anniversary of the Battle Of Britain. All of these songs were sung as the London population camped out in the underground stations. This arrangement will get the feet tapping as audiences sing along to the lively pieces and then sends shivers down their spines with the gorgeous 'Apple Blossom Time' featuring in the middle of the medley. This is a piece not to be missed and should belong in all bands libraries.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £25.00

    Cantus (on E.D.) - Peter Meechan

    From Leanne Stamp:"As musicians,I think we really identify ourselves and our existence on being musicians. And we collect these teachings and bondsalong our path. But whendoes it happen? When does that moment happen that someone becomes an integral part of the fabric that makes you who you are? Or when can you pinpointthe momentthat you realize that a person was essential in your path? I don’t think we know. And all too many times it isn’t until someone is gone that we truly reflect and try to figure it out.When Ed De'Ath joined our band (Las Vegas Brass Band) he hadn’t played in over 20 years. He heard the brass band and decided he wanted to go back to playing, and within a few weeks became a member of LVBB.He had grown up playing in Canada, where his father was a brass musician too, and Ed was quite an accomplished young euphonium player competing in competitions and playing in Salvation Army bands.But life happened and it lead him away from playing.Even though I was in LVBB a few years before Edjoined, he quickly became an essential part of what makes that group a family. I spent the better part of a decade playing in the same section as him and then about 5 years sitting next to him on either side.Ed always took a sincere interest in myplaying. Praising the good and giving constructive criticism for improvement. For about two years almost every otherSaturdaywasspent playing duets at his house.I left to study at the RNCM in Manchester, UK, before returning to Las Vegas.My first rehearsal back from the RNCM Ed looked at me said, “here you go kiddo, you’ve earned this solo seat”.There was no ego. Only the wish for me to reach my potential. It was always so apparent with Ed the love he shared for the younger musicians and his desire for them to succeed.Ed lit up the room with his enthusiasm and love for music – he just truly loved being there. That special quality that makes a band a family...he knew and treasured that.And although Ed wasn’t my teacher per say, he was an integral part of my fabric.The way Ed left was sudden. He had been fighting bladder cancer in and off for quite a while but things were looking up. Tests were clear. And then a very aggressive pancreatic cancer stole him very quickly, almost without warning.And I will never forget how I felt getting that call. We decided to have rehearsal that night. And for one reason. Because Ed would’ve wanted us to.I will always be grateful to Ed. Grateful that I got tolearn things from him, receive advice, enjoy his company, and feel his love – part of him is with me whenever I play."

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £45.00

    strange geometry

    strange geometrywas commissioned by Morgan Griffiths and the Hammonds Saltaire Band for their performance at the Brass in Concert Championships of 2015.As a bit of a space/sci-fi geek, as well as a musician, two events during the summer of 2015 had a particular effect on me. The first was the tragic early death in a plane crash of the famous film composer James Horner. Horner's music, particularly in films like ‘Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan’, ‘Avatar’, ‘Apollo 13’ and even his debut in Roger Corman's 1980 budget film ‘Battle Beyond the Stars’, defined for a generation the sound of sci-fi at the cinema. Along with John Williams he created the vocabulary for those who wish to express other-worldly wonder in music and his inventive talent will be much missed in an industry where originality has become something of a dirty word in recent years.The second event was the epic flyby of Pluto by the NASA New Horizons spacecraft. There are many reasons to find this mission inspiring – for example, the scientists and engineers behind it created a craft that has travelled at 37,000 mph for nine years and three billion miles to arrive within seventy-two seconds of the predicted time for the flyby. That they achieved this with such accuracy is an outstanding tribute to humanity's ingenuity and insatiable curiosity. However, the most exciting aspect of the mission was the clear, high resolution pictures of this unthinkably remote and inhospitable world beamed back to mission control. The best previous image of Pluto was an indistinct fuzzy blob – suddenly we could see mountains made of ice, glaciers of methane and carbon monoxide and nitrogen fog – features previously unimagined on a world thought to be a slightly dull ball of cold rock. The BBC's venerable astronomy programme 'The Sky at Night' waxed lyrical about these newly discovered features, referring to "the surprising discoveries of mountains and strange geometry on the surface of this cold distant world".I like to think that Horner would have been as inspired as I have been by this real-life science story, and this piece uses some of the vocabulary of the sci-fi movie soundtrack in a tribute to the memory of a great musician and to the inspirational geeks at NASA who have boldly taken us where no-one has gone before.Note: This work comes with a B4 score. Click here to view a preview PDF file.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days

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  • £29.95

    Island Whirl - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Island Whirl was commissioned by Margaret Milligan who wanted a brand new piece of music composed as a present for Ian, her husband for his 70th birthday. Ian Milligan is a keen and dedicated musician and he is the musical director of Callendar Brass, based in Callendar near Stirling in Scotland.Margaret contacted me about the possibility of composing a short lively piece which had a Scottish theme that would be ideal for Callendar Brass Band and any other ensemble to get their teeth into. This piece takes its inspiration from the traditional Scottish folk song ‘An Eriskay Love Lilt’ which is a particular favourite of both Margaret and Ian.With thunderous Celtic drums the piece opens in a whirlwind of sound with fanfare brass and an off-stage soloist that can perform using either the cornet or trumpet. After the exciting opening, the brass and drums die away to allow the off-stage soloist to air the traditional tune ‘An Eriskay Love Lilt’.The beautiful haunting melody, keeping its originality throughout undergoes a series of changes in the accompanying harmonic material before dying away to allow the Celtic drums to return. The percussion whip the band into a frenzy as the piece gets faster and faster. Just prior to the final notes the band diminuendo to allow one last closing statement from the Eriskay Love Lilt lead by the off-stage soloist before the ensemble charge to a dramatic close.When performing this piece I would recommend the off-stage soloist taking a position somewhere in the audience, so they can almost feel part of the performance. In addition, with the two tom-tom parts that represent the Celtic drums, bands should make the most of showcasing them by getting the two drummers out to the front of the band to perform. The ideal stage position would be with the players set up in stereo with one player in front of the soprano cornet and the other in front of the solo trombone.With the various choreographed movements from both the off-stage soloist and the percussionists. This piece is a great addition to any concert repertoire and is an ideal showcase for bands who want to try something a little different.I wish Ian at 70 years young, all the very best with his music making in the many years to come and I hope this piece, composed especially for him and Callender Brass brings them many years of musical enjoyment.Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days