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  • £47.00

    Theme from "Star Trek(R)" (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

    Who doesn't know the famous introduction "To boldly go where no man has gone before" at the beginning of each Star Trek sequel? Many generations grew up with Star Trek - one of the most iconic Sci-Fi series ever written. The original theme is as iconic as the opening line. A great warm up for the next Star Trek series in 2017, arranged by Thomas Doss. 03:15

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £65.00

    Three Klezmer Miniatures (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

    Three Klezmer Miniatures is Philip Sparke's third work based on traditional Jewish klezmer melodies, after Shalom! and A Klezmer Karnival. Klezmer music originated in the 'shtetl' (villages) and the ghettos of Eastern Europe, where itinerant Jewish troubadours, known as 'klezmorim', had performed at celebrations, particularly weddings, since the early Middle Ages. In Three Klezmer Miniatures Philip Sparke used the traditional tunes Sham Harei Golan Nigun Shel Yossi, Tumbalalaika, and Hava Nagila. 07:30

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £16.50

    Three Klezmer Miniatures (Brass Band - Score only)

    Three Klezmer Miniatures is Philip Sparke's third work based on traditional Jewish klezmer melodies, after Shalom! and A Klezmer Karnival. Klezmer music originated in the 'shtetl' (villages) and the ghettos of Eastern Europe, where itinerant Jewish troubadours, known as 'klezmorim', had performed at celebrations, particularly weddings, since the early Middle Ages. In Three Klezmer Miniatures Philip Sparke used the traditional tunes Sham Harei Golan Nigun Shel Yossi, Tumbalalaika, and Hava Nagila. 07:30

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £17.50

    Open All Hours - Wellington Guernsey & Joseph Ascher - John Lee

    The theme tune from one of Britain’s iconic comedy shows is in fact, an old tune entitled ‘Alice, Where Art Thou’ composed by Joseph Ascher, a Dutch composer and pianist. The opening title sequence of the show heard brass arranger, Max Harris performing his own version of the tune, who also composed the incidental music for the show. This light-hearted release coincides with the release of the new Open All Hours series starring David Jason who now runs the corner shop years later. A great easy going summer concert item and one that audience members will truly enjoy.(also playable by training bands)

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £55.00

    Purcell Variations - Kenneth Downie

    Purcell Variations, composed in 1995, the year of the tercentenary of the death of the great English composer, was a watershed work in that it was Downie's first extended composition to be published independently of The Salvation Army and intended for wider use. For his theme, Downie has chosen what has come down to us as the hymn tune Westminster Abbey, which is in fact an adaptation made in 1842 by Ernest Hawkins, who was a Canon of Westminster Abbey where Purcell himself had been organist. Purcell’s original is actually the closing section of an anthem, O God, Thou art my God, where it provides the final paean of praise, sung to repeated ‘Hallelujahs’. Purcell’s tune, particularly the opening triadic gesture, is used as a source of thematic and harmonic material – a quarry for ideas if you like: “I was obsessed with the intervals of thirds in Purcell’s tune, rather like Brahms in his Third Symphony”, the composer says.There are five variations, preceded by an extended introduction and theme. In the first variation, Purcell’s lilting dance pulse has been transformed into a bright, playful sequence, in which each phrase of the melody is given its own transformation. In the second, Purcell’s opening gambit is extended into a graceful, flowing waltz, featuring solo and first horn at the top of the register. The composer offers a range of metronome speeds in this movement, in which he is emulating the wistful elegance of Erik Satie’s famous Gymnopedie. We enter the world of big band jazz in variation three, where Purcell’s tune strides along with added syncopation and bluesy major/minor thirds to the fore. After the breathless energy and blazing brass of the big band, Downie moves into his ‘home territory’ for a beautifully worked lyrical variation. There is an enhanced urgency about the final variation, which opens with an extended reprise of the work’s introduction. Purcell’s second and third phrases provide the preparation for the exuberant return, in customary triumph of Purcell’s ‘Hallelujah’.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £74.95

    Eden - John Pickard

    This work was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the final of the 2005 Besson National Brass Band Championship, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London.The score is prefaced by the final lines from Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost (completed in 1663), in which Adam and Eve, expelled from Paradise, make their uncertain way into the outside world:“…The world was all before them, where to chooseTheir place of rest, and providence their guide:They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow,Through Eden took their solitary way.”My work is in three linked sections. In the first, the characters of Adam, Eve and the serpent guarding the Tree of Knowledge are respectively represented by solo euphonium, cornet and trombone. The music opens in an idyllic and tranquil mood and leads into a duet between euphonium and cornet. Throughout this passage the prevailing mood darkens, though the soloists seem to remain oblivious to the increasingly fraught atmosphere. A whip-crack announces the malevolent appearance of the solo trombone who proceeds to engage the solo cornet in a sinister dialogue.The second section interprets the Eden story as a modern metaphor for the havoc mankind has inflicted upon the world, exploiting and abusing its resources in the pursuit of wealth. Though certainly intended here as a comment on the present-day, it is by no means a new idea: Milton himself had an almost prescient awareness of it in Book I of his poem, where men, led on by Mammon:“…Ransacked the centre and with impious handsRifled the bowels of their mother earthFor treasures better hid. Soon had his crewOpened into the hill a spacious woundAnd digged out ribs of gold.”So this section is fast and violent, at times almost manic in its destructive energy. At length a furious climax subsides and a tolling bell ushers in the third and final section.This final part is slow, beginning with an intense lament featuring solos for tenor-horn, fl?gel-horn and repiano cornet and joined later by solo baritone, soprano cornet, Eb-bass and Bb-bass.At one stage in the planning of the work it seemed likely that the music would end here – in despair. Then, mid-way through writing it, I visited the extraordinary Eden Project in Cornwall. Here, in a disused quarry – a huge man-made wound in the earth – immense biomes, containing an abundance of plant species from every region of the globe, together with an inspirational education programme, perhaps offer a small ray of hope for the future. This is the image behind the work’s conclusion and the optimism it aims to express is real enough, though it is hard-won and challenged to the last.John Pickard 2005

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £74.95

    Eden - Score & Parts - John Pickard

    This work was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the final of the 2005 Besson National Brass Band Championship, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London.The score is prefaced by the final lines from Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost (completed in 1663), in which Adam and Eve, expelled from Paradise, make their uncertain way into the outside world:“…The world was all before them, where to chooseTheir place of rest, and providence their guide:They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow,Through Eden took their solitary way.”My work is in three linked sections. In the first, the characters of Adam, Eve and the serpent guarding the Tree of Knowledge are respectively represented by solo euphonium, cornet and trombone. The music opens in an idyllic and tranquil mood and leads into a duet between euphonium and cornet. Throughout this passage the prevailing mood darkens, though the soloists seem to remain oblivious to the increasingly fraught atmosphere. A whip-crack announces the malevolent appearance of the solo trombone who proceeds to engage the solo cornet in a sinister dialogue.The second section interprets the Eden story as a modern metaphor for the havoc mankind has inflicted upon the world, exploiting and abusing its resources in the pursuit of wealth. Though certainly intended here as a comment on the present-day, it is by no means a new idea: Milton himself had an almost prescient awareness of it in Book I of his poem, where men, led on by Mammon:“…Ransacked the centre and with impious handsRifled the bowels of their mother earthFor treasures better hid. Soon had his crewOpened into the hill a spacious woundAnd digged out ribs of gold.”So this section is fast and violent, at times almost manic in its destructive energy. At length a furious climax subsides and a tolling bell ushers in the third and final section.This final part is slow, beginning with an intense lament featuring solos for tenor-horn, fl?gel-horn and repiano cornet and joined later by solo baritone, soprano cornet, Eb-bass and Bb-bass.At one stage in the planning of the work it seemed likely that the music would end here – in despair. Then, mid-way through writing it, I visited the extraordinary Eden Project in Cornwall. Here, in a disused quarry – a huge man-made wound in the earth – immense biomes, containing an abundance of plant species from every region of the globe, together with an inspirational education programme, perhaps offer a small ray of hope for the future. This is the image behind the work’s conclusion and the optimism it aims to express is real enough, though it is hard-won and challenged to the last.John Pickard 2005

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    Elixir of Youth - Christopher Bond

    Elixir of Youth (2013) was written for the 2013 Brass for Heroes charity event where it was premiered on 19th October 2013 at St Paul’s Hall in Huddersfield under the baton of Philip Harper. The title of the work reflects the nature of the band that was put together for that premiere performance; an all-star youth band comprising a selection of the country’s young brass banding talent, with the term Elixir referring here to the everlasting talent seen in young brass players throughout the United Kingdom’s brass bands and bands’ and teachers abilities to keep producing such high quality musicians for the banding movement.The work, structured in three sections, is a showcase for band with a heroic opening where fanfare-like gestures in the cornets and trombones juxtapose rapid euphonium and baritone runs, alongside sweeping horns and percussion effects. As the piece progresses, a grove is introduced – just in the tubas at first, accompanied by a hi-hat - before spreading through the band, definitely stuff to tap your toes to! The middle, slower section of the work sees both flugel and cornet solos, with additional inputs from the euphonium and solo horn before a climax and return to the tempo and music of the opening section. A rousing close concludes the work where all of the work’s themes are interweaved to create a sense of power, unity and grandeur; an Elixir of Youth.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    When Thunder Calls - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    When Thunder Calls was commissioned by Dr Nicholas Childs and the Black Dyke Band for their performance at the Gala Concert of the Swiss Open Championships in September 2011. When composing this piece, I decided to focus on both the music and the stage presentation. The way the piece has been composed and designed makes it a very effective way of starting a concert or a second half of a concert.At the start of the piece, the percussion enter the stage and take their positions in their usual place behind the band. They begin playing the piece without a conductor. They keep repeating the opening section while the Basses, Horns, Baritones and Euphoniums march onto the stage.This group of musicians take their seats with the Horns, Baritones and Euphoniums sitting where they usually sit in the band but the Basses sit where the solo cornets usually sit, forming an inner semi-circle of lower brass. When seated and when the music gets to the end of bar 4 the piece continues onto section A. All performers keep repeating this next 4-bar phrase until the trombones march onto stage and stand at the front of the stage with the Bass Trombone standing in between the other two trombones.All performers then play from figure B to C with the trombones taking the lead at the front. When the performers get to rehearsal figure C they repeat this section (the same as section A) while the trombones move from the front of the stage and take their positions where the Basses would normally sit (between the horns and the percussion) and remain standing. Meanwhile, the flugel enters the stage and stands at the front of the stage (standing where the trombones did). When in position the flugel soloist picks up into rehearsal figure D.When the flugel soloist finishes playing, just before rehearsal figure F they then move to their normal seat in the band. At figure F the cornets march onto the stage from either side, they turn and stand side by side each other facing outward towards the audience forming two ‘fanfare’ lines either side of the lower brass. The conductor follows the cornets on stage and on cue they lift their instruments at the same time and perform when the piece gets to figure G.There is no more moving around from this point on other than the solo cornet to move forward with the solo euphonium and perform their duet at letter H. Also the horns are required to stand and play at letter I and then sit just before J.When performed with all the choreography, this piece makes for an exciting addition to any concert repertoire both for the performer and the audience.Suitable for 3rd Section Bands and Above

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    The Fire and the Phoenix - Christopher Bond

    Trombone Solo with Brass BandThe Fire & the Phoenix (2015) was commissioned by Brett Baker in early 2015 as the opening track to his solo CD 'Myths & Legends'. Whilst structurally a single-movement work, it is presented so that it can link directly into the next work on the CD, adding to a continuous theme comprising a number of pieces from a number of composers.Opening with huge strident chords in the full band, the representation of the phoenix is instantly reflected; bold, powerful and a bird of great intensity. This makes way for a more mystical section marked ‘distant’ which reflect the beauty of the Phoenix and it’s mythical nature where the trombone soars up into its higher register with a sweeping melody.Soon after, the music takes a sharp turn, becoming dramatic and instantly moving away from the mystical mood created previously. Here, we imagine the Phoenix catching fire, burning intensely with huge flames as it gradually turns into ash. We reach a tonic pedal point in the music, over which chord progressions subtly weave in and out of the texture. Here, we imagine the Phoenix rising from the ashes, with the dynamics gradually increasing to reflect this, slowly taking shape as it is born again.A return to earlier material follows, this time manipulated to reflect the Phoenix in its new form – the same bird; the same animal; but at the same time different. A beautiful chorale-like passage is heard before the music transports us back into a magical land, where delicate rhythmic ideas are juxtaposed against bolder lower chords; both ideas together transporting the listener forward into the next piece.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days