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    Fanfare for the Future - Andrew Stevenson

    Fanfare for the Future was commissioned by the organisers of the annual Madhurst Brass Festival 2012 to open the final concert. The title pays homage to the James Watson Memorial Fund, the choice charity of the event, which gives opportunities to young brass players. The piece opens with an epic fanfare featuring the cornets and trombones and the remaining instruments join gradually. The music then shifts gear into an exciting, fast tempo. This section features different time signatures, tricky technical passages and some of the initial motifs from the start return. The music then slows down for a melodic euphonium solo followed by a cornet solo which gradually builds to an emotional climax. The music gains tempo for a final sprint to the end, where the music finishes with a climax of rich chords and fanfares.

  • £39.95

    The Christmas Truce - Jonathan Bates

    DURATION: 7'30". DIFFICULTY: 2nd Section+. 'The Christmas Truce' was composed in 2018 for the Strata Brass Band and was used as part of their Christmas programme to mark 100 years since the end of the First World War. On the 24th December 1914, just a few weeks after war broke out, one of the most notable events of the 4-year conflict took place on the front line as the guns from both sides fell silent and soldiers came together on Christmas Eve. This composition for brass band and narrator tells the story of that night, painting a musical picture of the events as they unfolded. Using material from the carols 'In The Bleak Midwinter', 'O Tannenbaum' and 'Silent Night', the music weaves it's way around the events leading upto, during, and directly following the Christmas Truce, before culminating in a grand finale which incorporates the famous "the souls of the righteous are in the hands of God" quote from Eric Ball's 'Resurgam'. . .

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £25.00

    The Sword and the Star

    The Sword and the Star was written in 2006 for the Middleton Band at the request of their Musical Director, Carl Whiteoak. The inspiration for the work was the band's badge, which features a medieval archer. The town of Middeton's historical link with the symbol of the Archer came from the English victory at the Battle of Flodden in September 1513, where bowmen from Middleton and Heywood under the command of Sir Richard Assheton played a vital part in crushing the invading Scottish army. Sir Richard captured one of the Scottish commanders and presented the prisoner's sword to the St Leonard's church in Middleton in recognition of the town's contribution. As long time Lords of the Manor, the Assheton family crest was for centuries featured in the coat of arms of Middleton council, and when Middleton became part of the Metropolitan Borough of Rochdale the black star from the Assheton crest was used to represent Middleton in the new borough's coat of arms. Hence the title The Sword and the Star, for a piece which attempts to give an impression of the town as it was then and as it is now.The music is in three short sections – a fanfare, a lament and a bright scherzo – and simply aims to contrast the medieval hamlet of Middleton with the bustling urban centre it has now become. The central lament features a Scottish song called "The Flowers of the Forest", written to mourn the loss of so many of Scotland's young men on the field of Flodden; the song returns in a much more positive form at the end of the piece.To view a PDF preview of the score please click here, and to hear a preview of the opening played by Middleton Band click here.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days

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  • £65.00

    The Once and Future King

    DescriptionThe Once and Future King is a suite of three movements; each movement was inspired by an Arthurian legend. The first movement, 'Tintagel', concerns the famous Cornish promontory said to be the birthplace of King Arthur. In Arthur's time, Tintagel was part of the court of King Mark of Cornwall and the music imagines a visit by the King of the Britons to his Cornish neighbour and the place of his birth, reflecting the ceremony and drama of such an occasion; the music is strongly antiphonal, contrasting the more strident fanfares of the cornets and trombones with the warmth of the saxhorns and tubas.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Once-Future-King-Tintagel.mp3The second movement, 'Lyonesse', takes its inspiration from the mythical land which once joined Cornwall to the Isles of Scilly. One legend claims that after the disastrous battle of Camlan where Arthur and Mordred were both killed, the remnants of Arthur's army were pursued across Lyonesse to Scilly, whereupon Merlin cast a spell to sink Lyonesse behind them and drown the pursuers. Some say the bells of the 140 churches inundated that day can still be heard ringing. All the material in this movement derives from two short motifs heard in counterpoint at the very beginning, which are intentionally dissonant and bitonal in character.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Once-Future-King-Lyonesse.mp3The final movement, 'Badon Hill', takes its title from the legendary site of Arthur's last battle with the Saxons and is a lively toccata based on the medieval secular song L'Homme Armee ('The Armed Man'). The music uses a number of medieval devices including "hocketing" (passing melody from one voice to another). The actual site of Badon Hill is unknown but it has been associated with Badbury Rings in Dorset and a lot of evidence now points towards the town of Bath. Arthur's victory at Badon Hill was the last great victory for Celtic Britain over the Saxon invaders, but in the end only set the conquest back by a few decades. Arthur himself was dead by then, betrayed and defeated by his nephew Mordred, but it is said that Arthur only sleeps and will return in a time of dire need – hence the legend that Arthur's dying words were: Bury me in Britain, for I am the Once and Future King.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Once-Future-King-Badon-Hill.mp3

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days

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  • £24.95

    Swing the Mountain King - Edvard Grieg - Simon Kerwin

    'In the Hall of the Mountain King' was composed by Grieg as part of the incidental music for Henrik Ibsen's play Peer Gynt. A fantasy story written in verse, Peer Gynt tells of the adventures of the eponymous boy.The sequence in which In the Hall of the Mountain King is used is when Peer sneaks into the Troll Mountain King's castle. The piece is played when Peer attempts to escape from the King. When the trolls spot Peer, they give chase and the music begins to speed up. Peer begins to run, and the music begins to get increasingly louder and faster. Finally, at the end, the King catches Peer Gynt, picks him up and hurls him out the back door of the castle. The piece abruptly finishes on this note.This inventive arrangement from the pen of Simon Kerwin gives Grieg's original masterpiece a full big band treatment!

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £34.95

    The Rising - Andrew Ford - -

    To human beings, bush-fires are terrifying and often deadly events. But to the Australian bush, they bring the prospect of regeneration. After the conflagration, comes peace. It is often only a few days after the fire that the first shoots start to appear. Pale green leaves bud on charred branches. Slowly, the Bush renews itself. Over years, even decades, the native vegetation re-establishes itself, the undergrowth becomes thick once more. In effect, of course, the forest is now stockpiling fuel, and if not checked and occasionally cleared, the cycle must continue. The Bush needs fire to survive. These were the images I had in mind when I was composing The Rising. This is what gave me my structure.But, really, the piece might represent any sort of rising - revolutionary or religious, cosmic or simply musical - where a violent event brings peace and then, after a time, too much peace leads to violence. This short work begins with one big bang, then builds inexorably towards another. At the end, it feels as though the piece might begin again (and again (and again)) . . .The Rising was commissioned by the Black Dyke Band and is dedicated to them with respect and great admiration. ? Andrew Ford

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £24.95

    The Dirty Duck - Dan Price - -

    The Dirty Duck is named after a public house opposite the Royal Shakespeare Company in Stratford and was commissioned by cornet superstar Tom Hutchinson.Composer Dan Price explains, "Tom was looking for a solo that was virtuosic in content with strong jazz influences and something of a crowd pleaser. The Dirty Duck was the end result. The piece sits firmly within the big band style, taking influence from the dance bands of the 1940s led by such greats as Benny Goodman, Duke Ellington and Count Basie."The first performance of The Dirty Duck was given by Tom Hutchinson with the Cory Band conducted by David Childs on October 1st 2011 at Wiltshire Music Centre. The work's premiere recording features on the commercial disc, Cory In Concert Volume II, performed by Tom Hutchinson with the Cory Band conducted by Robert Childs.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £44.95

    The Golden Apples of the Sun - Rodney Newton - -

    This work was commissioned in 2012 by the percussionist, Yasuaki Fukuhara, and takes its title from the final verse of W.B.Yeats' poem, The Song of Wandering Aengus;Though I am old with wandering,Through hollow lands and hilly lands,I will find out where she has gone,And kiss her lips and take her hands;And walk among long dappled grass,And pluck till time and times are done,The silver apples of the moon,The golden apples of the sun.This piece does not seek to follow the narrative of the poem, but rather takes lines from it as an inspiration for three contrasting movements.The first movement, Through Hollow Lands and Hilly Lands, is in the form of a dogged march over a repeated bass line, featuring tom-toms, snare drum and cymbals playing rhythms associated with rock drumming. At the end of the movement, the marimba enters with material that will be heard in the next movement.The second movement, The Silver Apples of the Moon, features vibraphone, glockenspiel and crotales, as well as the dobachi (a resonant bronze bowl of Japanese origin). The music is delicate and ethereal.In contrast, the final movement, The Golden Apples of the Sun, is energetic and fiery, featuring tubular bells, timpani and other tuned percussion instruments including cowbells.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £59.95

    PLANTAGENETS, The (Brass Band Set) - Edward Gregson

    The Plantagenets was composed for the Championship Section of the Regional contests of the National Brass Band Championships of Great Britain 1973. The work is not intended to be programme music but rather it tries to portray the mood and feelings of an age, that of the House of Plantagenet, which lasted from the middle of the 12th century to the end of the 14th century. To many, it conjures up an Age of Chivalry and this is represented by fanfare motifs which occur throughout the work in varied form. The opening thematic figure, rising through the band in thirds and followed by the fanfares, is important as nearly all the subsequent material is based upon it. There follows two themes, the second of which is lyrical and introduced by horns. In the long, slow middle section, a new theme is introduced by a solo horn (recurring on cornet and euphonium in canon) and is developed at some length. A lively fugato scherzino, however, leads to a recapitulation of the opening section music and the work ends with a maestoso statement of the slow movement theme. A final reference to the fanfares ends the work.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £60.00

    Music for the Royal Fireworks - Don Blakeson

    Handel’s Music For The Royal Fireworks was composed in 1749 to celebrate the signing of the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle and the end of the War of the Austrian Succession. The site chosen was the fashionable upper part of St. James Park, which was becoming known at that time as Green Park. The Green Park ‘Machine’, which housed the pyrotechnics was an elaborate affair adorned with “statues and other figures, festoons of flowers, and other lustres”. It was announced that there would be some 10,000 rockets and other devices to be let off, all culminating in a grand, burning sun with ‘Vivat Rex’ at its centre. There were also rumours that the event was to be accompanied by an impressively large band of military music and mention was made of “40 trumpets, 20 french horns, 16 hautboys (oboes), 16 bassoons, 8 pairs of kettle drums, 12 side drums, a proper number of flutes and fifes; with 100 cannon to go off singly at intervals”. It is unlikely that Handel had ever conceived such forces and it was merely the promoter’s hyberbole, not least because it was unlikely that there were sufficient numbers of extra military musicians available that could read music, as most played from memory. It is also likely that Handel, and his publisher, were conscious that future performances would be hindered by such forces. The autographed score lists the instrumentation as 9 trumpets, 9 french horns, 24 hautboys, 12 bassoons, 3 pairs of kettle drums and up to 4 side drums. The work is in five movements, although Handel’s original score did not indicate in which order they should be played. However, in this score they are arranged to be played as follows: Overture, Bour?e, La Paix, Minuets and La R?jouissance. This arrangement has been recorded by the Leyland Band, conducted by Thomas Wyss, and appears on the CD Crown Imperial . A soundclip is available here Item Code: TPBB-039 Duration: c. 19 minutes

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days