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  • £30.00

    Russian Rag - George L Cobb, Sandy Coffin

    Interpolating the world famous"Prelude" by RachmaninoffCommissioned by John Wallace, this arrangement of Russian Rag has been crafted by Sandy Coffin through close listening of the available recordings of the Harlem Hellfighters Band. Sandy had been heavily involved with the Historic Brass Society symposium 2017 held in New York and assisted John with his research on this fascinating band and the style of music it generated.Eye-witness accounts refer to the 369th band ‘dancing’ rather than ‘marching’. Above all, in modern performance, finding a ‘dancing beat’ is crucial to a successful performance of this Ragtime march in order to do justice to the great pioneering work of James Reese Europe. Note the cheeky virtuosity and rubato!Look and Listen (courtesy of Tullis Russell Mills Band):Background to the Harlem HellfightersThe US Army 369th Regiment, made up largely of African-Americans from New York, became known as the Harlem Hellfighters because of the heroic reputation which accrued to them during the actions they engaged in during the First World War in Europe.James Reese Europe was one of the most active African-American composer/musical directors in the pre-war American music scene. The legendary Harlem Hellfighters Band, which he assembled in 1917 from African-American and Puerto Rican musicians, came at an important transitional point in musical history. A new form of music called jazz was emerging from Ragtime and the performing style of Europe’s band was immersed in the flow of this new direction.Europe’s Harlem Hellfighters influenced and inspired everyone who heard them, including the welcoming crowd when they disembarked in France, bowled over by their swinging rendition of La Marseillaise. Reese Europe became a war hero, commanding a machine-gun unit as well as the band.On return from War in 1919 the band led a ticker-tape parade along Fifth Avenue in New York and soon made about 30 shellac recordings. These recordings display some of the fingerprints of their performing style: ragging, improvising, muting, wailing, smearing (their word for glissando) – and from the evidence of their recordings they took the printed page as a blueprint for individuality.In May 1919 during the Hellfighters’ triumphant coast-to-coast tour after their return, James Reese Europe was tragically murdered, bringing to premature close, at the age of 39, the work of a great musical innovator.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £30.00

    MARCH SLAV (Brass Band) - Littlemore, Phillip

    March Slavwas composed in 1876 at the request of Nicolai Rubenstein (who had recently spurned Tchaikovsky's first piano concerto, and might have wanted to return to favour with the composer). Tchaikovsky loved Russian folk music??"looking to it for inspiration throughout his career??"and he makes considerable use of it here. From the opening theme to the final glorious statement of the Czarist national anthem, the march draws on the music of his motherland. It was first performed in a charity concert to support a war effort in the Balkans. He composed and fully scored the march in the short time of just 5 days. At the first performance its impact was such that it had to be encored in full, receiving a tumultuous reception - twice! Duration: 7:20

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £112.00

    March Slav (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Tchaikovsky, Peter Ilyich - Wilkinson, Keith M.

    March Slav was composed in 1876 for a charity concert to support the war in the Balkans. It was completed in the remarkably short time of 5 days and was encored twice at its first performance! The themes are based loosely on Serbian folk songs and there is also a reference to the Russian national anthem. The mood is funereal in style at the opening but this gives way to a very triumphant style by the end.This arrangement was prepared for the 2007 Summer concerts of Brass Band of the Western Reserve, musical director Dr Keith M Wilkinson (www.bbwesternreserve.org). It has been recorded by BBWR on the CD Slides Rule!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £112.00

    March Slav - Tchaikovsky

    March Slav was composed in 1876 for a charity concert to support the war in the Balkans. It was completed in the remarkably short time of 5 days and was encored twice at its first performance! The themes are based loosely on Serbian folk songs and there is also a reference to the Russian national anthem. The mood is funereal in style at the opening but this gives way to a very triumphant style by the end.This arrangement was prepared for the 2007 Summer concerts of Brass Band of the Western Reserve, musical director Dr Keith M Wilkinson (www.bbwesternreserve.org). It has been recorded by BBWR on the CD Slides Rule!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £35.00

    SYMPHONY No.1, Finale from (Brass Band) - Rachmaninoff, Sergei - Littlemore, Phillip

    Rachmaninov composed his First Symphony in 1895, at the age of just 22 years. It received its first performance on March 27, 1897, at a Russian Symphony Society concert in St. Petersburg with Alexander Glazunov conducting. The premiere was not well-received, and Rachmaninov himself blamed Glazunov for a lacklustre approach for beating time rather than finding the music. Some contemporary reports even suggested that Glazunov was inebriated when he took to the stage! Despite the disappointment of the premiere performance, Rachmaninov never destroyed the score but left it behind when he left Russia to settle in the West, eventually it was given up for lost. After the composer's death, a two-piano transcription of the symphony surfaced in Moscow, followed by a set of orchestral parts at the conservatory in Saint Petersburg. In March 1945, the symphony was performed in Moscow for the first time since its 1897 premiere. It was a grand success, and this led to a new and more enthusiastic evaluation of the symphony. In March 1948 it received a similarly successful American premiere and the work proceeded to establish itself in the general repertory. The final movement (Allegro con fuoco) is colourful and grand but not without its darkly contrasting, menacing episodes that intensifies its malevolence. It is a work overflowing with ideas demonstrating a strong, highly individual, and self-assured young talent. Duration: 5:40

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £35.00

    Finale from 'Symphony No.1' - Sergei Rachmaninov - Phillip Littlemore

    Rachmaninov composed his First Symphony in 1895, at the age of just 22 years. It received its first performance on March 27, 1897, at a Russian Symphony Society concert in St. Petersburg with Alexander Glazunov conducting. The premiere was not well-received, and Rachmaninov himself blamed Glazunov for a lacklustre approach for beating time rather than finding the music. Some contemporary reports even suggested that Glazunov was inebriated when he took to the stage! Despite the disappointment of the premiere performance, Rachmaninov never destroyed the score but left it behind when he left Russia to settle in the West, eventually it was given up for lost. After the composer’s death, a two-piano transcription of the symphony surfaced in Moscow, followed by a set of orchestral parts at the conservatory in Saint Petersburg. In March 1945, the symphony was performed in Moscow for the first time since its 1897 premiere. It was a grand success, and this led to a new and more enthusiastic evaluation of the symphony. In March 1948 it received a similarly successful American premiere and the work proceeded to establish itself in the general repertory. The final movement (Allegro con fuoco) is colourful and grand but not without its darkly contrasting, menacing episodes that intensifies its?malevolence. It is a work overflowing with ideas demonstrating a strong, highly individual, and self-assured?young talent. Iten Code: TPBB-027 Duration: 5'40"

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £49.95

    Marche Slave - Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky - Robert Childs

    Tchaikovsky wrote Marche Slave in 1876 for a charity concert to support a war effort in the Balkans. He composed and fully scored the march in just five days. The themes are loosely based on three Serbian folk songs, each with a quite different character, and it also incorporates the Russian national anthem. At the first performance its impact was such that it had to be encored in full, receiving a tumultuous reception - twice!This arrangement was made for the combined forces of Black Dyke Band and Cory Band for the British Open Gala Concert given in Symphony Hall, Birmingham on Sunday 14th September 2008, the performance of which was conducted by the arranger.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days