Searching for Wind Band Music? Visit the Wind Band Music Shop
We've found 16 matches for your search

Results

  • £46.20

    Somewhere Only We Know

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £46.20
  • £19.95

    Fire in the Blood - Score Only - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Fire in the Blood was commissioned by Dr Stephen Cobb for the 120th anniversary of the International Staff Band of the Salvation Army. The piece was composed for the celebration concert where the ISB were joined by several other staff bands from around the world to perform independently to a sell-out capacity crowd at Britain’s most famous concert hall The Royal Albert Hall. Fire in the Blood received its world premier at the ‘ISB 120’ concert at the Royal Albert Hall on June 4th 2011.With this piece I wanted to acknowledge music that had an impact on me through my Salvation Army upbringing. When thinking of a title for this piece I had no hesitation than to reflect and re-word the Salvation Army’s motto under their famous crest ‘Blood and Fire’.When composing Fire in the Blood I wanted to use three songs of worship that have been prevalent in the Salvation Army’s services over a number of years. Opening with Richard Phillips’ setting of Psalm 95, ‘Sing for Joy’, the music is vibrant and full of energy, I wanted to capture the spirit of the well known words of Scripture. The music then moves into a more reflective section that includes Howard Davies’ emotive song melody ‘Lord, you know that we love you’ and Laurie Klein’s worship song ‘I love you Lord’.A re-statement of the opening Psalm setting follows and this, in turn, leads into a dramatic and powerful finale that combines two pivotal statements drawn from the slower, reflective section: I love you lord, and I lift my voice to worship you, O my soul rejoice and Lord, you know that we love you with a final flourish from Psalm 95: Come let us sing joy to the Lord!Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £24.95

    The Dark Side Of The Moon - Score Only - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    This piece was commissioned by Dr. Nicholas Childs and Black Dyke Band on behalf of Rotary International and received its world premi?re performance at St. David's Hall, Cardiff on Saturday 27th January 2007. It is dedicated to the composer's father, Harry Cooper.The music was selected by the National Contesting Council as the 3rd section test piece for the 2008 Regional Brass Band Championships of Great Britain. A Note from the Composer...Have you ever thought of a holiday destination, tourist attraction, event, place, site or period in history and thought 'I wonder what it would be like?' - somwhere you have never been and can only let your imagination run wild on. What would the place be like, and all the things surrounding it such as the mood, feelings you get experiencing it, the temperature? Who would be there and what you would see? This piece is my musical imagination of the dark side of the moon. I know from news reports, the internet and other footage that the moon is a very desolate place, very barren and rugged. So from the start the piece gives the listener a musical picture of the rugged landscape with little light and warmth.However, the one place that has had me thinking about is the side of the moon that we don't see in our night skies, the side of the moon with no sun and no light pollution from civilisation. I can only imagine the eeriness one would feel being stood in complete darkness on the moon's surface looking around.As you slowly explore the surroundings and your eyes drift up to the night sky, there is an awesome sight unfolding in front of you - countless stars and galaxies, planets and different solar systems and all right in front of you glistening from the light of the sun beaming from the other side of the moon. The Dark Side of the Moon portrays a musical picture of the whole experience as seen in my imagination taking the listener from the rugged landscape to the awesome beauty that sits endlessly in front of you.Paul Lovatt-Cooper, September 2007

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £9.95

    Golden Pass (Brass Band - Score only)

    The Golden Pass is a rail line in the Swiss Alps that connects Montreux, located by Lake Geneva, to Lucerne, in central Switzerland. This composition echoes the thoughts and feelings of a passenger who watches the changing landscapes he observes on this journey: green meadows full of grazing cows and traditional chalets, beautiful mountain lakes, waterfalls and mountain tops, including the scenic Bru?ning Pass. Is this real or just a dream? We may never know! 02:45

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

     PDF View Music

  • £8.50

    Veni Immanuel (Brass Band - Score only)

    The Advent hymn we all know today as O Come, O Come, Immanuel was arranged in its modern form by Thomas Helmore and published in Hymnal Noted in 1856. Both the words and melody, however, predate this version by centuries. The words are based on a 9th century antiphon and the tune, Veni Immanuel, is taken from a 15th century processional of French Franciscan nuns, part of the setting for the funeral hymn Libera Me. This arrangement aims to expand on the power and mystery of the original tune and will be most effective if the solo cornet at the start and end of the piece can be placed away from the band, maybe at the back of the auditorium. 06:00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

     PDF View Music

  • £25.00 £25.00
    Buy from Peter Meechan Music

    Cantus (on E.D.) - Peter Meechan

    From Leanne Stamp:"As musicians,I think we really identify ourselves and our existence on being musicians. And we collect these teachings and bondsalong our path. But whendoes it happen? When does that moment happen that someone becomes an integral part of the fabric that makes you who you are? Or when can you pinpointthe momentthat you realize that a person was essential in your path? I don’t think we know. And all too many times it isn’t until someone is gone that we truly reflect and try to figure it out.When Ed De'Ath joined our band (Las Vegas Brass Band) he hadn’t played in over 20 years. He heard the brass band and decided he wanted to go back to playing, and within a few weeks became a member of LVBB.He had grown up playing in Canada, where his father was a brass musician too, and Ed was quite an accomplished young euphonium player competing in competitions and playing in Salvation Army bands.But life happened and it lead him away from playing.Even though I was in LVBB a few years before Edjoined, he quickly became an essential part of what makes that group a family. I spent the better part of a decade playing in the same section as him and then about 5 years sitting next to him on either side.Ed always took a sincere interest in myplaying. Praising the good and giving constructive criticism for improvement. For about two years almost every otherSaturdaywasspent playing duets at his house.I left to study at the RNCM in Manchester, UK, before returning to Las Vegas.My first rehearsal back from the RNCM Ed looked at me said, “here you go kiddo, you’ve earned this solo seat”.There was no ego. Only the wish for me to reach my potential. It was always so apparent with Ed the love he shared for the younger musicians and his desire for them to succeed.Ed lit up the room with his enthusiasm and love for music – he just truly loved being there. That special quality that makes a band a family...he knew and treasured that.And although Ed wasn’t my teacher per say, he was an integral part of my fabric.The way Ed left was sudden. He had been fighting bladder cancer in and off for quite a while but things were looking up. Tests were clear. And then a very aggressive pancreatic cancer stole him very quickly, almost without warning.And I will never forget how I felt getting that call. We decided to have rehearsal that night. And for one reason. Because Ed would’ve wanted us to.I will always be grateful to Ed. Grateful that I got tolearn things from him, receive advice, enjoy his company, and feel his love – part of him is with me whenever I play."

  • £19.50

    Ombra Mai Fu - Handel - Jonathan Bates

    Whilst many will not know the music by name, upon hearing a few bars, the music is recognisable as one of Handel's most famous works. This however was not always the case. 'Ombra Mai Fu' is the opening Aria from the opera 'Serse' which was a failure upon its release, lasting only five performances following its premiere. Thankfully the work was rediscovered some years later and became one of the most famous classical music pieces we know today. Originally composed to be performed by a castrato singer, Jonathan Bates has now arranged this timeless classic into a beautiful cornet solo that would feature well in both the concert hall and bandstand.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days