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  • £30.00

    Here's That Rainy Day

    Trombone Solo.In 1953, a new musical by Johnny Burke and Jimmy Van Heusen was staged, “Carnival in Flanders”. Unfortunately, it was not successful. However, one of the songs, “Here’s that Rainy Day” became a standard on the cabaret scene.I have arranged this memorable song for solo trombone and brass band. It begins in a Latin style, then moves to the famous Jazz Big Band style. Good key players make the band parts playable by most bands – as long as they like to ‘swing’! The trombone part is not easy, on the other hand, neither is it aimed at the ‘select few’ virtuoso players. Impressive stuff though, with ‘written’ sections that sound like improvisation.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days
  • £24.95

    The Great Parade (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Downie, KennethCode:

    This piece is intended to be a bright, sparkling concert march and features the spiritual 'I got a robe'. The quick tempo is to encourage a performance of sparkle and wit and, at the same time, to reflect the mood of celebration in the spiritual. The song was sung by slaves to encourage them to remember that, although they might be deprived of even basic items like robes in their present plight, one day, when they get to heaven, 'all God's children got a robe'.

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days
  • £64.95

    Platform to the Heavens - Lovatt-Cooper, Paul

    The piece takes its inspiration from the mountain ranges from one of my favourite countries, Switzerland.I have visited the Swiss Alps on many occasions and I am still taken back by its sheer awesome beauty with every visit. This commission gave me the opportunity to pay homage to this wonderful landscape and paint my own musical picture of it.The piece opens with what I imagine daybreak would be like at one of its many peaks. With the sun growing behind the mountain range, the piece builds from a single note to a huge climatic chord revealing Mother Nature’s creation.Then at rehearsal figure ‘C’ the tempo changes dramatically as we fly through the many slopes of the mountains as if on a manic skiing expedition, revealing the many dangers within the Swiss Alps.The twists, turns and climaxes begin to die away as we enter rehearsal figure ‘M’ - nightfall over the mountains. As the sun disappears, the sky darkens to reveal the beautiful starlit sky above the mountain range. This middle section starts with the various cadenzas that serve as echoes around the Alps. It then leads to a lyrical solo at rehearsal figure ‘O’ as the moonlight illuminates the icy mountain peaks. A final cadenza to conclude this section highlights the end of nightfall as the sun starts to rise again.This recapitulation from the opening, signals a new dawn as the sun rises above the snowy peaks once again. The music at this point in its slightly altered state highlights the dawn of a new day in the Alps. The fast manic ski ride follows which takes the piece to its grand finale conclusion.The idea behind the title of this piece is that the Swiss Alps are so beautiful and vast; I can only imagine that they could be a platform connecting the earth to the heavens above.Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days
  • £45.00

    Bathgate Hills Trilogy - Andrew Duncan

    Composed by Andrew Duncan and written for the West Lothian Schools Band, A Bathgate Hills Trilogy is in three movements, each one dedicated to and representing a different hill.Comments from the composer:Movement 1 – Dechmont LawThe first movement describes the peculiar events which took place in November 1979 when a forestry worker, Bob Taylor, had a close encounter with an alien spacecraft in Dechmont Woods at the bottom of Dechmont Hill. Bob Taylor’s account from the time describes a large sphere like object about twenty feet across which pulled him by the legs towards it, caustic smoke then caused him to pass out. He awoke a short time later in the same spot but the spaceship had gone leaving behind marks in the soil. His story caused a great deal of media interest and a great deal of excitement in the local community.Movement 2 – The Knock HillThe Term ‘Knock’ is Scottish Gaelic for ‘hill’ and the Knock Hill is the highest peak in the Bathgate Hills being 305 metres above Sea Level. On a clear day the Knock hill has excellent views of the Bass Rock to the East and the distant hills of Arran to the West as well as of the whole of West Lothian and across the Firth of Forth to Fife and beyond to the North.The second movement is a description of a leisurely walk to the summit of this hill and the enjoyment of a pleasant summer’s day spent walking and taking in the beautiful panoramic views. However, as is the case with the Scottish Summer, a change in the weather finds a clear blue sky being replaced with dark rain clouds. The changed weather brings a sudden brief but unwelcome cold downpour of rain, drenching anyone out walking! Finally, the clouds pass and the more pleasant summer weather returns.Movement 3 – Cairnpapple HillCairnpapple Hill is a near neighbour of the Knock Hill. It is almost as high but interest in Cairnpapple Hill lies in the outstanding archaeological monument near the summit, an Iron Age burial chamber. The chamber dates back to 25 years BC and was built by a mysterious people known as the Beaker People (so called because they left behind a number of large earthenware beakers). The mysteries of Cairnpapple Hill have always been a source of fascination for me ever since first visiting the hill as a school child.The third movement describes the lives of the Beaker People. The landscape they would have looked out on would have been mostly dense forest which would have contained many perils including dangerous wolves and bears. Life was harsh and short for the Beaker People and they would always have been close to danger and to death. The average life expectancy for the Beaker People was only 31 years of age. The summit of the hill would have been clear of forest and would have afforded the Beaker People some protection as they could see all around the near countryside enabling them to keep a watchful lookout for their enemies – both animal and human!

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days
  • £65.73

    We Seven (Brass Band) Derek Jenkins

    We Seven, the title of this work, comes from a book by the same name written by the United States's first astronauts. The composer writes: 'In 1959, the United States entered the space race by starting a programme whose main aims included sending a solo astronaut into space and recovering him safely. Project Mercury, as this programme was so called, recruited the first seven American astronauts and successfully sent six of them into space. These men were Scott Carpenter, Gordon Cooper, John Glenn, Gus Grissom, Wally Schirra, Alan Shepard, and Deke Slayton, and collectively they became known as the 'Mercury Seven.' Through their efforts and those of countless others, the United States Space Program accomplished much with these six flights, including successfully sending an astronaut into space, putting a man in orbit, and keeping him up there for more than 24 hours. In 1962, shortly after Glenn and Carpenter's orbital flights, the 'Mercury Seven' co-wrote the book We Seven and throughout it, the astronauts discuss the events leading from their selection into the programme up through Carpenter's flight in May of 1962. The primary material for the work comes from two sources: the use of musical cryptograms to encode the astronauts names and initials into pitches and the aria 'Un bel di vedremo' from Giacomo Puccini's opera, Madame Butterfly. The inclusion of the latter comes directly from one of Glenn's chapters in the book. Together with a couple of the other astronauts, he would often listen to the opera to unwind from a long day of training. I would like to think that as he was orbiting the Earth that this opera, particularly this aria, would be running through his mind.' This work commemorates the Project Mercury on the 50th anniversary of its conclusion and was written for Joseph Parisi and the University of Missouri-Kansas City Wind Ensemble. This version for brass band has been prepared by the composer for the Fountain City Brass Band. To view a video of Fountain City Brass Band performing the work please visit: www.youtube.com/watch?v=yD3sBWhGkOo Sheet music available from: UK - www.brassband.co.uk USA - www.solidbrassmusic.com Difficulty Level: 1st Section + Instrumentation: 1 Soprano Cornet (Eb) 9 Cornets (Bb) [Both 3rd Cornets double Crystal Glasses] 1 Flugelhorn 3 Tenor Horns (Eb) [2nd Horn doubles Crystal Glasses] 2 Baritones (Bb) 2 Trombones (Bb) 1 Bass Trombone 2 Euphoniums (Bb) 2 Basses (Eb) 2 Basses (Bb) 4 Percussion

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days
  • £62.80

    Dream a Little Dream of Me - Gus Kahn

    This song was written in 1931 by Fabian Andre and Wilbur Schwandt with lyrics by Gus Kahn. It's now one of the most popular songs from the Great American Songbook and it's also recorded in many versions. Ella Fitzgerald, Louis Armstrong and Nat King Cole are among the most famous ones that have recorded it. In later years singers like Michael Buble, Diana Krall land Robin Williams have all recorded "Dream a Little Dream of Me". This arrangement is inspired by the version by American band Chicago from their 1995 album release "Night & Day".

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days

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