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  • £79.95

    Malcolm Arnold Variations - Score and Parts - Martin Ellerby

    MALCOLM ARNOLD VARIATIONS was commissioned by Philip Biggs and Richard Franklin for the 20th All England Masters International Brass Band Championship held in the Corn Exchange, Cambridge on 25 May 2008. The work is dedicated to Anthony Day, long time carer of Sir Malcolm Arnold in his final years. I first met Malcolm and Anthony in 1990 and remained in constant touch until Malcolm’s passing in 2006. Anthony, of course, remains a friend and plays his own role subliminally in this piece. The work is not based on any of Malcolm Arnold’s own themes, rather it is a portrait of him (and by association Anthony Day) through my eyes and as a result of my friendship with both parties over some 18 years. If there is any theme as such it is the personalities of the players, the protagonist and his carer placed together by my own efforts coloured and influenced by aspects of Arnold’s style and technique without recourse to direct quotation but through allusion and parody. It is of course designed as a brass band test piece but in my eyes is first and foremost a musical challenge. The pyrotechnical elements are there but always secondary to the musical thrust of the work’s structure. I have long beforehand submerged myself in Malcolm Arnold’s music and ultimately delivered this tribute. Music Directors will be advised to acquaint themselves with the composer’s personal music, particularly the film scores, symphonies, concertos and ballets: the solutions towards a successful interpretation of my piece are all in there – and YES, I want, and sanction, this piece to be interpreted, and therein lies the challenge for those of you ‘up front’! The challenge for players is that of virtuosity, ensemble and careful attention to where they are individually in relation to their colleagues – a question of balance, taste and insight. With regard to tempi, as is my usual custom, I have indicated all metronome marks with the prefix circa. I would suggest that the fast music is played at these tempos but that the more rubato moments can be allowed some freedom in expression and fluidity of line. With regard to the type of mutes to be employed – this decision I leave to the discretion of players and conductors. Structurally the work is cast as an Introduction, 20 Variations and a Finale. Some variations are self contained, others run into each other as sequences in the same tempo. In other variations, segments are repeated and developed. I could describe the overall concept as a miniature ballet or a condensed film score – there is much drama and character and the repeated elements assist this in driving the action forward. I have deliberately avoided the more extremely dark qualities of Malcolm’s own music in this, my celebration of this master-composer, as I have always viewed (and evidenced by my previous Masters scores Tristan Encounters and Chivalry) that the Cambridge contest is a ‘sunshine- affair’ and firmly believe that Malcolm Arnold would have had it no other way too!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £29.95

    Black and White Rag - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    I have taken this tune and arranged it as a xylophone solo with brass band accompaniment.When performing the piece it is relatively straight forward. However, the soloist needs to be aware that the split part at rehearsal figure B in the first four bars is a melody and accompanying figure.The ‘stride like’ quavers that start on notes C and G are to be played with the left stick, while the syncopated solo melody line is to be played with the right stick. At the fifth bar of figure B the soloist can play the semiquavers as they see fit and then return to their ‘stride’ style at bar 46 and so on when it appears.This is a great Rag and it works really well as a solo showcase for xylophone.Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £65.00

    The Once and Future King

    DescriptionThe Once and Future King is a suite of three movements; each movement was inspired by an Arthurian legend. The first movement, 'Tintagel', concerns the famous Cornish promontory said to be the birthplace of King Arthur. In Arthur's time, Tintagel was part of the court of King Mark of Cornwall and the music imagines a visit by the King of the Britons to his Cornish neighbour and the place of his birth, reflecting the ceremony and drama of such an occasion; the music is strongly antiphonal, contrasting the more strident fanfares of the cornets and trombones with the warmth of the saxhorns and tubas.The second movement, 'Lyonesse', takes its inspiration from the mythical land which once joined Cornwall to the Isles of Scilly. One legend claims that after the disastrous battle of Camlan where Arthur and Mordred were both killed, the remnants of Arthur's army were pursued across Lyonesse to Scilly, whereupon Merlin cast a spell to sink Lyonesse behind them and drown the pursuers. Some say the bells of the 140 churches inundated that day can still be heard ringing. All the material in this movement derives from two short motifs heard in counterpoint at the very beginning, which are intentionally dissonant and bitonal in character.The final movement, 'Badon Hill', takes its title from the legendary site of Arthur's last battle with the Saxons and is a lively toccata based on the medieval secular song L'Homme Armee ('The Armed Man'). The music uses a number of medieval devices including "hocketing" (passing melody from one voice to another). The actual site of Badon Hill is unknown but it has been associated with Badbury Rings in Dorset and a lot of evidence now points towards the town of Bath. Arthur's victory at Badon Hill was the last great victory for Celtic Britain over the Saxon invaders, but in the end only set the conquest back by a few decades. Arthur himself was dead by then, betrayed and defeated by his nephew Mordred, but it is said that Arthur only sleeps and will return in a time of dire need – hence the legend that Arthur's dying words were: Bury me in Britain, for I am the Once and Future King.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days

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  • £35.00

    Hymnus Antverpiae (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

    This hymn was commissioned by "Antwerpen 93". And this city, on the banks of the river Schelde has been nominated "Cultural Capital of Europe" for 1993. The work-group "animatie" took the initiative and commissioned a hymn, which -as the finale to a grand open-air event on 27th March- was premiered by hundreds of musicians from all over Europe. Philippe Langlet (France) was the conductor at this majestic occasion.Musically speaking the piece can no doubt be labeled easy. Indeed it is meant to represent a hymn, playable by all in different instrumental combinations. Consequently a variable instrumentation was chosen and a type of music, which by native is easily accessible and uncomplicated.The conductor is free -in the instrumentation- to score this piece according to his own taste. It is perhaps advisable to use the sharp brass in the forte parts, in order to make the range in the sound of the orchestra as colouful as possible. The percussion parts are not absolutely essential, so that the hymn can also be performed without percussion. 04:00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £29.95

    Deep Harmony (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Pullin, Stuart

    Stuart Pullin unfortunately passed away at a very early age, just 32, but leaves a wonderful legacy of compositions. It was his wish that this moving arrangement of 'Deep Harmony' be donated to The Salvation Army for publication so that it can now be played and appreciated by all.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £25.50

    Willy Wonka (Selections From) - Leslie Bricusse & Anthony Newman - Gavin Somerset

    Few people have not seen the 1971 film starring Gene Wilder as the eccentric chocolatier, offering tours of his chocolate factory to those lucky enough to find the hidden golden ticket. Whilst initialy a box office failure, the film went on to become a favourite in households across the world, years after its initial release. Now for the first time, your band can enjoy the music from the film in this selection that includes 'Golden Ticket', 'The Candy Man' and of course, the unforgettable 'Pure Imagination'. The music of Leslie Bricusse & Anthony Newley has been a hit for many years and continues to make TV and radio appearances. 'The Candy Man' was perhaps best known when covered by Sammy Davis Jr where it made it to number one in the USA. 'Pure Imagination' has been used countless times in adverts in the media and more recently, recorded by Jamie Callum for his album 'Momentum'. 'Pure Imagination' can also be performed as a stand-alone item. This is truly an all-time classic filled with a feast of musical variety that fits well into just about any concert. A must for all band libraries.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £21.50

    Colours Of The Wind - Alan Menken - Gavin Somerset

    This moving title track from the Disney Film "Pocahontas" is, as you would expect from composer Alan Menken, a joy to listen to and can bring a whole cocktail of emotions. The film was Disney's first to be based on a real character and tells of the relationship between Pocahontas and Englishman John Smith. "Colours of the Wind" went on to win an Academy Award, a Golden Globe and a Grammy Award. Selling 2.3 million copies, if that wasn't enough, it also reached No.4 in the US Pop Charts, sung by Vanessa Williams. This heart-warming piece with an emotional climax belongs in every bands library .

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £69.95

    Transformation (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Downie, Kenneth

    I believe in transformation, God can change the hearts of men, And refine the evil nature, till it glows with grace again'. So wrote John Gowans in the second verse of his great hymn, 'I believe that God the Father, can be seen in God the Son', written specifically to affirm Salvationists' beliefs. It is sung to the tune Bethany and in seeking to explore this great subject at the heart of the Christian gospel in musical terms, the composer has used this fine tune as the basis. Although it never appears in its entirety, it is seldom out of the picture and much of the work is derived from it. The other main source of material is the lovely, simple chorus, 'Some day I shall be like him, changed to heavenly beauty, when his face I see'. This chorus is especially prominent in the middle section but there are important references to it throughout. There are also brief references to Charles Wesley's hymn, 'Love Divine' and, in particular, the telling lines, 'Changed from glory into glory, till in Heaven we take our place'. The work suggests that, at times, the process of being transformed is a struggle, portrayed with many passages of fraught and demanding music. Considerable reserves of stamina and technique are required while, in contrast, the chorus, 'Some day I shall be like him' provides the warm, gentle centre of the work. The premiere of the work was given by The International Staff Band of The Salvation Army in Cadogan Hall on Friday 3rd June 2011, as part of the band's 120th anniversary celebrations.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £24.95

    The Pilgrim's Prayer (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Rouse, Sydney - Ball, Eric

    Introduction - This could hardly be more simple. Inexperienced players may have some little difficulty in intonation, especially as they are starting 'cold', but a useful lesson can be learned in this connection when rehearsing these two bars. Section A - The music is hymn tune-like in character, but it should not become stilted. Close intonation is still a point to study, especially in view of the chromatic nature of some of the harmony. Section B - Aim to secure just balance in the accompanying parts, especially in the second phrase, where the 1st comets may be inclined to treat their moving part as an independent melody rather than part of the 'colour' background. Section C -This is a reprise of the first theme, with a different arrangement. The same comments apply, however. Section D - Here the music becomes more song-like in style, and provides an interesting contrast. The scoring, too, is more varied, and there are a number of points that call for attention. Note that the 1st and 2nd comets and 2nd trombone work as a team throughout; see that the pulsating, syncopated background adds to the movement of the music without giving a jerky effect; the new entries in the fourth and twelfth bars are to be made quite smoothly; and do not allow the texture of the music, especially in the last eight bars of the section, to overshadow the simplicity of the main tune. Section E - Here the first subject appears again. In the arrangement the colour contrasts are quite clear-cut. In order to secure true balance in the fifth and sixth bars, it may be necessary to adjust the amount of tone given by the bass trombone, as this part is not doubled as are the other parts. Section F -This section forms a simple but expressive coda.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £69.95

    Revelation - Score and Parts - Philip Wilby

    Symphony for Double Brass on a theme of Purcell 1995 marked the tercentenary of Purcell’s death, and my new score Revelation has been written as a tribute to his music and the ornate and confident spirit of his age. There are five major sections: 1 Prologue 2 Variations on a ground bass I 3 Fugue 4 Variations on a ground bass II 5 Epilogue and Resurrection The score uses many features of the Baroque Concerto Grosso, and arranges players in two equal groups from which soloists emerge to play in a variety ofvirtuoso ensembles. It quotes freely from Purcell’s own piece Three Parts on a Ground in which he has composed a brilliant sequence of variations over a repeating six-note bass figure. This original motif can be heard most clearly beneath the duet for Cornet 5 and Soprano at the beginning of the 2nd section. There is, of course, a religious dimension to Revelation as the title suggests, and the score is prefaced by lines by the 17th century poet John Donne. His Holy Sonnet paraphrases the Book of Revelation in which the dead are raised at the sounds of the last trumpet. Donne’s trumpets are themselves placed stereophonically “. . . At the round Earth’s imagined corners” and it is this feature that today’s players represent as they move around the performing area. Their final apocalyptic fanfares can be heard at the close of the score, as Purcell’s music re-enters in a lasting tribute to England’s first composer of genius. Philip Wilby September 1995 At the round Earth imagined corners, blow your trumpets, angels, and arise, arise from death, you numberless infinities Of souls, and to your scattered bodies go. All whom the flood did, and fire shall o ‘erthrow All whom war, dearth, age, agues, tyrannies, Despair, law, chance hath slain, and you whose eyes Shall Behold God, and never taste death woe. John Donne after Revelation Ch. 11 v.15

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days