Searching for Wind Band Music? Visit the Wind Band Music Shop
We've found 97 matches for your search

Results

  • £44.60

    Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree - Stept - Bjorn Morten Kjaernes

    "Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree (With Anyone Else but Me)" is a popular song that was made famous by Glenn Miller and by the Andrews Sisters during World War II. Its lyrics are the words of two young lovers who pledge their fidelity while one of them is away serving in the war.Originally titled "Anywhere the Bluebird Goes", the melody was written by Sam H. Stept as an updated version of the nineteenth-century English folk song "Long, Long Ago". Lew Brown and Charles Tobias wrote the lyrics and the song debuted in the 1939 Broadway musical Yokel Boy. After the United States entered the war in December 1941, Brown and Tobias modified the lyrics to their current form, with the chorus ending with "...'till I come marching home".In 1942 the song was featured in the film Private Buckaroo as a performance by the Andrews Sisters with the Harry James orchestra and featuring a tap dancing routine by The Jivin' Jacks and Jills. It was featured in the films Twelve O'Clock High (1949), With a Song in My Heart (1952), Kiss Them for Me (1957), A Carol for Another Christmas (1964), In Dreams (1999) and The Master (2012). It also featured in the mini-series The Pacific. You can use the song both on musical concerts, movie concerts or just as a happy jazz tune on your next concert.On the sections (like from bar 25), please work carefully to make a good balance with all parts, and that each chord is balanced. With 4-part harmonies sometimes you need to hold back certain notes to make the accord sound good.If you want to open up for a longer improvisation, you can repeat 65 to 81, but then change the part 2 in bar 80 from Eb to a D on the repeat. The accord will be an F6 instead of F7 (on beat 3 and 4 in bar 80) Have fun and enjoy!

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

     PDF View Music

  • £90.00

    Scottish Dances - Peter Martin - Menno Haantjes

    Scottish Dances is based on three Scottish traditionals: Cock of the North, The Bonnie Bank's O'Loch Lomond and Marie's Wedding. I. Cock of the North's name is used for multiple things or events. For example for a locomotive to a famous, it seems, delicious liqueur, and rallies to snowboard competitions. Furthermore is "Cock O' the North " a nickname of a famous Duke. (The 4th Duke of Gordon). In this composition Cock of the North (a Jig) is a traditional Scottish bagpipe tune, regularly played on tattoos by Pipe Bands. Not infrequently the drummers sing the text. Auntie Mary, had a canary, Up the leg of her trousers While she was sleeping I was peeping Up the leg of her trousers. II. " The Bonnie Bank's O'Loch Lomond " is about a sad story that took place during an revolt against the British. In 1745 Bonnie Prince Charlie had to retreat. Two of his men were captured. One was convicted and executed, while the other was released. The spirit of the executed soldier would arrive in Scotland via the 'low road' (underworld) before his companion, who had still a long way to go. You'll take the high road And I'll take the low road And I'll be in Scotland afore ye But me and my true love will never meet again On the Bonnie Bonnie Banks of Loch Lomond III. In a Scottish wedding, after the official ceremonies, there is often danced. This is called a ceilidh. For this we use traditional Scottish music such as "Marie's Wedding '. Mid dance we go back to the church, where a lovely song in honor of the couple sounds. Marie's Wedding has been recorded by Van Morrison (among many others). Step we gaely, on we go, heel for heel and toe for toe Arm and arm and on we go, all for Marie's wedding

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

     PDF View Music

  • £44.00

    Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree - Stept-Brown-Tobias - Bjorn Morten Kjaernes

    "Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree (With Anyone Else but Me)" is a popular song that was made famous by Glenn Miller and by the Andrews Sisters during World War II. Its lyrics are the words of two young lovers who pledge their fidelity while one of them is away serving in the war. Originally titled "Anywhere the Bluebird Goes", the melody was written by Sam H. Stept as an updated version of the nineteenth-century English folk song "Long, Long Ago". Lew Brown and Charles Tobias wrote the lyrics and the song debuted in the 1939 Broadway musical Yokel Boy. After the United States entered the war in December 1941, Brown and Tobias modified the lyrics to their current form, with the chorus ending with "...'till I come marching home".In 1942 the song was featured in the film Private Buckaroo as a performance by the Andrews Sisters with the Harry James orchestra and featuring a tap dancing routine by The Jivin' Jacks and Jills. It was featured in the films Twelve O'Clock High (1949), With a Song in My Heart (1952), Kiss Them for Me (1957), A Carol for Another Christmas (1964), In Dreams (1999) and The Master (2012). It also featured in the mini-series The Pacific. You can use the song both on musical concerts, movie concerts or just as a happy jazz tune on your next concert. On the sections (like from bar 25), please work carefully to make a good balance with all parts, and that each chord is balanced. With 4-part harmonies sometimes you need to hold back certain notes to make the accord sound good. If you want to open up for a longer improvisation, you can repeat 65 to 81, but then change the part 2 in bar 80 from Eb to a D on the repeat. The accord will be an F6 instead of F7 (on beat 3 and 4 in bar 80) Have fun and enjoy!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £124.95

    Metropolis 1927 - Peter Graham

    Fritz Lang's 1927 science fiction epic Metropolis is considered to be a masterpiece of cinematic vision and a high point of German Expressionist filmmaking. Set in a future dystopian world the film introduces the viewer to two contrasting communities living in the vast city of Metropolis. Those above ground live a life of privilege and pleasure serviced by the underground-dwelling drone workers whose role is to maintain and operate the banks of machines which provide the city's power.Lang's film, which can be considered a type of 20th century morality play, draws upon a range of themes and influences from Marxist ideals and social satire to overt religious symbolism.The music does not attempt to precis the plot, such as it is, but simply reflects my musical responses to Lang's noirish visual style and set designs – the brooding machine rooms, the decadent nightclubs, the gothic cathedral and so on – paradoxically a world of terrifying beauty.Metropolis 1927 was commissioned by Bramwell Tovey and The National Youth Brass Band of Great Britain with funds provided by The Arts Council of England. The first performances took place in the Winter Gardens, Weston-super-Mare on Saturday 19th April and in the Cheltenham Town Hall on Sunday 20th April 2014.This revised version was premiered by The Black Dyke Band, conductor Nicholas Childs, at the 38th European Brass Band Championships in the Konzerthaus Freiburg, Germany, on Saturday 2 May 2015.Peter Graham

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

     PDF View Music

  • £44.00

    Minerva - Jan Van der Roost

    Minerva by Jan Van der Roost was composed on the commission of the German "Musikverein Braunshausen" on the occasion of the 75th anniversary of the orchestra. The composition, first performed on September 17, 1999, is not a street march but a concert march, just like Mercury and Arsenal. The use and variation of different rhythmic patterns gives the first part of this march a distinctly dynamic character. Two main themes are presented in several instrumental combinations. The theme from the trio, on the other hand, is characterized by a broad melodic approach using large intervals. This theme, wreathed by high woodwinds, is heard one more time after a contrasting new part, but now in a somewhat slower tempo. The counterpoint in this part refers to the first part of the march. The brilliant ending suits a festive anniversary march!

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £44.95

    Road to Run - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    The piece starts with a simple rhythmic pulse which is the basis of the entire work. This cell provides a platform for the piece to grow and develop starting with the first theme played by the euphoniums, all the way through to the conclusion performed in full gusto by the whole ensemble. The various motifs introduced throughout the opening of the piece are passed between the ensemble before the introduction of the three soloists.The central section of the piece features the Solo Trombone, Cornet and Euphonium as they take turns to play a jazz fusion solo whilst having some musical interplay with each other at the front of the stage. After this solo passage, the music then features the various sections within the ensemble, which pays homage to Weather Reports' famous "Birdland". In a jazz fused cannon, each new independent musical phrase is performed by the various sections standing. Starting with the Horns then Solo Cornets, Back Row and Flugal and finally the Baritones and Trombones.Once the different sections of the ensemble are featured, the piece then moves into the final stages. This section sees a reprieve of the opening material heard at the beginning, but further developed with the various melodic motifs passed around the ensemble. The ending builds on this material towards a rousing conclusion."Road to Run" is an up tempo, high energy concert work that has that 'feel-good factor' from start to finish. The idea behind the title is based on the feel and structure of the piece which takes the listener on a musical journey. And at 150 beats per minute - you could put it in your headphones and find your own 'Road to Run'.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £45.00

    strange geometry

    strange geometrywas commissioned by Morgan Griffiths and the Hammonds Saltaire Band for their performance at the Brass in Concert Championships of 2015.As a bit of a space/sci-fi geek, as well as a musician, two events during the summer of 2015 had a particular effect on me. The first was the tragic early death in a plane crash of the famous film composer James Horner. Horner's music, particularly in films like ‘Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan’, ‘Avatar’, ‘Apollo 13’ and even his debut in Roger Corman's 1980 budget film ‘Battle Beyond the Stars’, defined for a generation the sound of sci-fi at the cinema. Along with John Williams he created the vocabulary for those who wish to express other-worldly wonder in music and his inventive talent will be much missed in an industry where originality has become something of a dirty word in recent years.The second event was the epic flyby of Pluto by the NASA New Horizons spacecraft. There are many reasons to find this mission inspiring – for example, the scientists and engineers behind it created a craft that has travelled at 37,000 mph for nine years and three billion miles to arrive within seventy-two seconds of the predicted time for the flyby. That they achieved this with such accuracy is an outstanding tribute to humanity's ingenuity and insatiable curiosity. However, the most exciting aspect of the mission was the clear, high resolution pictures of this unthinkably remote and inhospitable world beamed back to mission control. The best previous image of Pluto was an indistinct fuzzy blob – suddenly we could see mountains made of ice, glaciers of methane and carbon monoxide and nitrogen fog – features previously unimagined on a world thought to be a slightly dull ball of cold rock. The BBC's venerable astronomy programme 'The Sky at Night' waxed lyrical about these newly discovered features, referring to "the surprising discoveries of mountains and strange geometry on the surface of this cold distant world".I like to think that Horner would have been as inspired as I have been by this real-life science story, and this piece uses some of the vocabulary of the sci-fi movie soundtrack in a tribute to the memory of a great musician and to the inspirational geeks at NASA who have boldly taken us where no-one has gone before.Note: This work comes with a B4 score. Click here to view a preview PDF file.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days

     PDF View Music

  • £64.95

    Suite from Gloria - Karl Jenkins

    "The Latin text of the Gloria is an ancient hymn of praise from the Christian tradition derived from the song of the angels who announce the birth of Jesus, as recorded in the Gospel according to St Luke. The Gloria has formed part of the Ordinary of the Mass for many centuries, and in that context has been set by many composers; there are also independent settings by Handel, Vivaldi and Poulenc. But the opportunity to work with such an iconic text also afforded me an opportunity to explore how other religions perceive the Divine. This is an ongoing feature of my work, from the multi-faceted The Armed Man: A Mass for Peace, the Japanese haiku in my Requiem to the ancient Arabic text in my Stabat Mater.” Karl Jenkins, June 2010Originally scored for choir, orchestra and ethnic percussion, Karl Jenkins’ Gloria received its world premiere on November 7th 2010 at the Royal Albert Hall, and was recorded in the same year by the National Youth Choir of Great Britain and the London Symphony Orchestra conducted by Karl Jenkins.This version for brass band and percussion was arranged and edited by Andrew Wainwright and Robert Childs, and received its premiere on November 16th 2014 at The Sage Gateshead performed by the Grimethorpe Colliery Band conducted by Robert Childs.The work is in five movements: I. The Proclamation: Gloria in Excelsis DeoThe Proclamation begins with a rousing fanfare featuring antiphonal cornet choirs, before unison plainchant introduces melodic lines for solo cornet flugel horn and tutti band. The movement closes with a return to the fanfare style. II. Prayer: Laudamus tePrayer is typical of Karl Jenkins; serenely beautiful and lyrical in style. This movement features various soloists and works well in isolation. III. The Psalm: Tehellim - Psalm 150The Psalm is vibrant and high paced featuring ethnic style percussion. Virtuosic in nature the movement also makes use of the antiphonal cornet choirs.IV. The Song: I’ll Make MusicThe Song represents the ‘Golden Section’ of the suite and is presented here as a cornet solo. Like Prayer, this heavenly music is also effective as a stand alone concert item.V. The Exaltation: Domine Deus The Exaltation follows the same form as The Proclamation. With a lyrical middle section featuring solo horn, flugel and solo cornet, the start and finish make use once again of brilliant antiphonal cornet choirs.Suite from Gloria can be heard on 'Grimethorpe Entertain' CD available to buy here.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £34.50

    Old Chalet, The (Traditional Switzerland) - H. Snell

    Alpine sonorities and melodies are mixed together here from such diverse sources as the alpenhorn, via Brahms, but basically from a lovely traditional melody "High up on the mountain, there was an old chalet". In fact the melody is current well outside Switzerland and can be found equally in the Auvergne in central France. The offstage alpenhorn parts can as easily be played on a euphonium, without vibrato of course. This piece has never failed to hold the audience' attention for the full 6 or 7 minutes (depending on the performance). It is realtively easy to play and simply needs a little organisation of the groups of players.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £44.00

    December 7th - Hans Zimmer - Klaas van der Woude

    The commemoration of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour on 7th December 1941 was portrayed in the unique film Pearl Harbour, staring Tom Cruse. The music was composed by the prize winning composer Hans Zimmer. The piece December 7th is a dramatic work which accompanies the high point of the film and Klaus van der Woude's arrangement looses none of the excitement of the original.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

     PDF View Music