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  • £22.00

    Old Friends (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

    -

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £22.00

    Old Friends - Turner, V

    Includes a full band set (no score)

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £74.95

    Vienna Nights - Score & Parts - Philip Wilby

    The City of Vienna stands at one of the historic crossroads of the world, linking east and west and embracing artistic influences from all sides. In the 250th anniversary year of Mozart's birth, this fantasy on Mozart's celebrated Piano Sonata in A (K331), has been composed true to the form and content of the original, but also to the underlying substance of the conception.One of Mozart's distinguishing features, and one that links him to later music by Beethoven, Schubert, Mahler and Schoenberg, is the breadth of his musical vision. His music links intellectual rigour with ecstatic utterance and darker preoccupations. It is, perhaps, this shadow-laden side of his musical nature which gives his work a profundity often absent in the work of his contemporaries. Admirers of his Requiem Mass or the Statue music in Don Giovanni will recognise that it is this extra sense of reality which makes Mozart so relevant to the modern age, and where he may link hands with the other great Viennese thinkers such as Berg, Webern and Adorno.The composer follows the three movement plan of the Sonata closely. The original begins with a Theme and Variations which is freely quoted. His Minuet is mirrored in the Recitative and Notturno, where each section of the band lays down a metaphoric rose to his memory. Famously, the sonata ends in populistic style with a Turkish Rondo. Ever since the Hapsburg-Ottoman Wars, which came to an end in the seventeenth century, Viennese composers have included Turkish elements in their music, not least in the use of certain percussion instruments. Vienna Nights is thusly a homage.It celebrates the world's greatest composer, but also the city which fostered his work. Here, in your imagination, you might easily conjure up a caf table near the Opera House, where Mozart, Mahler and Sigmund Freud, observed by us all from a discreet distance, may meet as old friends.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £32.50

    Vienna Nights - Score Only - Philip Wilby

    The City of Vienna stands at one of the historic crossroads of the world, linking east and west and embracing artistic influences from all sides. In the 250th anniversary year of Mozart's birth, this fantasy on Mozart's celebrated Piano Sonata in A (K331), has been composed true to the form and content of the original, but also to the underlying substance of the conception.One of Mozart's distinguishing features, and one that links him to later music by Beethoven, Schubert, Mahler and Schoenberg, is the breadth of his musical vision. His music links intellectual rigour with ecstatic utterance and darker preoccupations. It is, perhaps, this shadow-laden side of his musical nature which gives his work a profundity often absent in the work of his contemporaries. Admirers of his Requiem Mass or the Statue music in Don Giovanni will recognise that it is this extra sense of reality which makes Mozart so relevant to the modern age, and where he may link hands with the other great Viennese thinkers such as Berg, Webern and Adorno.The composer follows the three movement plan of the Sonata closely. The original begins with a Theme and Variations which is freely quoted. His Minuet is mirrored in the Recitative and Notturno, where each section of the band lays down a metaphoric rose to his memory. Famously, the sonata ends in populistic style with a Turkish Rondo. Ever since the Hapsburg-Ottoman Wars, which came to an end in the seventeenth century, Viennese composers have included Turkish elements in their music, not least in the use of certain percussion instruments. Vienna Nights is thusly a homage.It celebrates the world's greatest composer, but also the city which fostered his work. Here, in your imagination, you might easily conjure up a caf table near the Opera House, where Mozart, Mahler and Sigmund Freud, observed by us all from a discreet distance, may meet as old friends.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £12.00

    Vienna Nights - Study Score - Philip Wilby

    The City of Vienna stands at one of the historic crossroads of the world, linking east and west and embracing artistic influences from all sides. In the 250th anniversary year of Mozart's birth, this fantasy on Mozart's celebrated Piano Sonata in A (K331), has been composed true to the form and content of the original, but also to the underlying substance of the conception.One of Mozart's distinguishing features, and one that links him to later music by Beethoven, Schubert, Mahler and Schoenberg, is the breadth of his musical vision. His music links intellectual rigour with ecstatic utterance and darker preoccupations. It is, perhaps, this shadow-laden side of his musical nature which gives his work a profundity often absent in the work of his contemporaries. Admirers of his Requiem Mass or the Statue music in Don Giovanni will recognise that it is this extra sense of reality which makes Mozart so relevant to the modern age, and where he may link hands with the other great Viennese thinkers such as Berg, Webern and Adorno.The composer follows the three movement plan of the Sonata closely. The original begins with a Theme and Variations which is freely quoted. His Minuet is mirrored in the Recitative and Notturno, where each section of the band lays down a metaphoric rose to his memory. Famously, the sonata ends in populistic style with a Turkish Rondo. Ever since the Hapsburg-Ottoman Wars, which came to an end in the seventeenth century, Viennese composers have included Turkish elements in their music, not least in the use of certain percussion instruments. Vienna Nights is thusly a homage.It celebrates the world's greatest composer, but also the city which fostered his work. Here, in your imagination, you might easily conjure up a caf table near the Opera House, where Mozart, Mahler and Sigmund Freud, observed by us all from a discreet distance, may meet as old friends.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    Three Burns Portraits - Rodney Newton

    Robert Burns (1759-1796) was one of the most colourful literary figures of the 18th Century. The son of a tenant farmer, he was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, and earned a living variously as a farmer, flax dresser and exercise man, gradually establishing himself as a poet, lyricist and collector of folksongs. A charismatic character, by the time of his death he had become Scotland's best known and best-loved poet. This work depicts three characters from his personal life who also figure in his poetry. Although Burns intended much of his verse to be sung, and even wrote tunes himself for many of his lyrics, all the melodies in this work are original.I John AndersonJohn Anderson (1759-1832) was an Ayrshire carpenter and close friend to Robert Burns, who immortalised Anderson in his affectionate poem John Anderson Ma Jo, which imagines both men in old age (although Burns was only 37 when he died). Anderson is reputed to have made Robert Burns' coffin and survived the wrecking of the paddle steamer Cornet at Craignish Point near Oban during a storm in 1820, an event incorporated into this movement. This is a picture of a tough, resilient Scot who meets the storms of Life head-on.II Mary CampbellRobert Burns had numerous love affairs, sometimes with more than one woman at a time. Mary Campbell, a sailor's daughter from the highland district of Dunoon, had entered service with a family in Ayrshire when she met Burns. Although involved with another woman at the time, Burns was smitten with Campbell and there is evidence to suggest that he planned to emigrate to Jamaica with Mary. However, nothing came of this wild scheme and Mary, fearing disgrace and scandal left the area but not before Burns had enshrined her in at least two poems, Highland Mary and To Mary Campbell. Significantly, the first line of the latter runs, "Will ye go to the Indies, my Mary, and leave auld Scotia's Shore?" (His ardent pleading can be heard in the middle section of the movement). Mary's music paints a portrait of a graceful young lady who had the presence of mind not to be entirely won over by the charms of Robert Burns.III Douglas GrahamBurns was a heavy drinker, and this is most likely a contribution to his early death. He was matched in this capacity by his friend, Douglas ‘Tam' Graham, a farmer who sought solace in the bottle from an unhappy marriage. Burns used his drinking partner as a model for the comic poem, Tam O'Shanter, which tells of a drunken Ayrshire farmer who encounters a Witches' Sabbath and escapes with his life, but at the cost of his horse tail. The story was said to be made up by Graham himself to placate his fearsome, but very superstitious, wife after he arrived home one night, worse the wear for drink and with his old mare's tail cropped by some village prankster. This present piece depicts Tam enjoying a riotous night at a local hostilely in the company of his friends, John Anderson and ‘Rabbie' Burns.Rodney Newton - 2013

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £98.00

    KirkFeld (Trombone Solo with Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Kirkhope, Grant - McKenzie, Jock

    Written for Ian Bousfield and the International Trombone Festival 2017. Grant Kirkhope is a BAFTA nominated British composer who has created the soundtrack for video games that have sold in excess of 30 million copies. From "GoldenEye" to "Banjo-Kazooie", "Viva Pinata" to "Donkey Kong", "Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning" to "Civilization: Beyond Earth" and "Perfect Dark" to "Castle of Illusion starring Mickey Mouse". He has also recently scored the feature film "The King's Daughter" starring Pierce Brosnan and William Hurt and is currently working on "Yooka Laylee" and "Dropzone". Grant's score for "Viva Pinata" was nominated by BAFTA in the Original Score category in its 2007 awards. Grant is represented by the prestigious Gorfaine/Schwartz Agency by Cheryl Tiano and Kevin Korn. Grant has a degree in music from the Royal Northern College of Music, Manchester, where he majored in classical trumpet, is a green card holder and now lives in Agoura Hills, LA with his wife and two children. "Ian and I first met when we were around 15 years old. We both played in our county orchestra, the North Yorkshire Schools Symphony Orchestra (I was a trumpet player). I think we hit it off straight away, as we were definitely a couple of cheeky kids, if you know what I mean! We both ended up playing in Rowntree Mackintosh Brass Band for a while too which Ian's Dad, Trevor conducted. We bumped into each other again when we both went for the Shell/LSO Scholarship. I got to the area finals in Manchester so I was pretty pleased with myself but then I saw Ian and I knew it was all over! Of course Ian went on to win and the rest is history. I saw him again when I was attending the Royal Northern College of Music around 1983 by which time Ian had just got the principal chair at the Halle Orchestra. Then I guess 30 something years went by as we both went about our lives and lost touch. We re-kindled our friendship due to his wife really. She emailed me to say it was Ian's 50th birthday and she was collecting stories from all his friends over the years. After that we got back in touch and then one day on Facebook I got a message from him in typical dry Yorkshire fashion "now then Grant, I had a listen to your music and I think it's good, how about writing a piece for me ?" I was a little bit unsure at first but of course I loved Ian's playing and of course I said yes. Over a Skype call in 2016, he asked me what I thought I'd write. I said since I live in LA I'd like to write a "Hollywood" trombone piece. Imagine if John Williams had written a piece for solo trombone, that's what I'd like to write - well I'd certainly like to try" - Grant Kirkhope

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £98.00 £98.00
    Buy from Superbrass

    KirkFeld

    Grant Kirkhope Grant Kirkhope is a BAFTA nominated British composer who has created the soundtrack for video games that have sold in excess of 30 million copies. From “GoldenEye” to “Banjo-Kazooie”, “Viva Pi?ata” to “Donkey Kong”, “Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning” to “Civilization: Beyond Earth” and “Perfect Dark” to “Castle of Illusion starring Mickey Mouse”. He has also recently scored the feature film “The King’s Daughter” starring Pierce Brosnan and William Hurt and is currently working on “Yooka Laylee” and “Dropzone”. Grant’s score for “Viva Pi?ata” was nominated by BAFTA in the Original Score category in its 2007 awards. Grant is represented by the prestigious Gorfaine/Schwartz Agency by Cheryl Tiano and Kevin Korn. Grant has a degree in music from the Royal Northern College of Music, Manchester, where he majored in classical trumpet, is a green card holder and now lives in Agoura Hills, LA with his wife and two children. “Ian and I first met when we were around 15 years old. We both played in our county orchestra, the North Yorkshire Schools Symphony Orchestra (I was a trumpet player). I think we hit it off straight away, as we were definitely a couple of cheeky kids, if you know what I mean! We both ended up playing in Rowntree Mackintosh Brass Band for a while too which Ian’s Dad, Trevor conducted. We bumped into each other again when we both went for the Shell/LSO Scholarship. I got to the area finals in Manchester so I was pretty pleased with myself but then I saw Ian and I knew it was all over! Of course Ian went on to win and the rest is history. I saw him again when I was attending the Royal Northern College of Music around 1983 by which time Ian had just got the principal chair at the Halle Orchestra. Then I guess 30 something years went by as we both went about our lives and lost touch. We re-kindled our friendship due to his wife really. She emailed me to say it was Ian’s 50th birthday and she was collecting stories from all his friends over the years. After that we got back in touch and then one day on Facebook I got a message from him in typical dry Yorkshire fashion “now then Grant, I had a listen to your music and I think it’s good, how about writing a piece for me ?” I was a little bit unsure at first but of course I loved Ian’s playing and of course I said yes. Over a Skype call in 2016, he asked me what I thought I’d write. I said since I live in LA I’d like to write a “Hollywood” trombone piece. Imagine if John Williams had written a piece for solo trombone, that’s what I’d like to write - well I’d certainly like to try” – Grant Kirkhope