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  • £22.00

    Old Friends (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

    -

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £22.00

    Old Friends - Turner, V

    Includes a full band set (no score)

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £102.00

    Rhapsody in Black - Andi Cook

    Rhapsody in Black - Andi Cook - 10'40'' - BVT126 The primary inspiration for this work comes from the composer’s first encounter with the genre of Symphonic Metal - the opening track of the 2004 Nightwish album 'Once', entitled Dark chest of Wonders. The combination of full orchestra, operatically trained female vocals and the raw power of a Scandinavian metal band was a potent mix that instantly had me hooked.That same dark and powerful sound is one that a brass band can generate, and I've tried to capture that in this composition. Heavy Rock/Metal as a genre is arguably fifty years old now, but symphonic metal is a newer concept, and I feel possibly the one that can bridge the gap between two musical styles very dear to me.Composer Gilbert Vinter had explored through music the connotations that different colours held for him, and his movement Purple from 'Spectrum' gave me an idea for the structure of ‘Rhapsody in Black’. Andi Cook explored the different connotations of one colour within his own life, black being an easy choice due to the personal dichotomy of the black leather jacket he wore to the rock club on Friday night and the black suit jacket and tie he wore to the concert hall the next day.To avoid repetition the word 'black' is omitted from the five movement titles, each of which is a different episode. '...as Thunder' is a furious argument between two people - the top and bottom of the band - set against the backdrop of a storm, with lightning flashing outside while barbs, insults, sarcasm, tears and even violence is traded inside. Following that '...Satin and Pearls' is an old black-and-white movie with a wistful character to it as if we're looking back a screen icon with fondness long after their career or even their life has ended. '...as the Raven's Wing.' is deliberately gothic and funereal, hinting at Edgar Allen Poe's similarly named poem, with undertones of death and afterlife. The shift into F/C Minor (band pitch) represents the descent - alive - into the grave that Poe had a paranoid fear of his entire life. Family and friends standing around grieving, oblivious as we're lowered into the earth despite frantic attempts to make ourselves heard. '...and Chrome' is an unashamed motorcycle reference with all its born-to-be-wild, open air, high speed and freedom overtones. In a deliberate contrast to what went before it continues several of the same motifs though this time in the major key. Lastly, we reprise the second movement with '...as the Night Sky' which is simply the feeling of walking home under the summer stars, with someone important - who that is, is left to the listener, but a walk under the stars is always that bit special.There's an old saying that very few things are black and white. I hope this work will prove that even black alone isn't quite as simple as it's often made out....‘Rhapsody in Black’ is dedicated to the composer’s friend and mentor John Roberts, who shares his love of both brass and rock.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £34.95

    Three Burns Portraits - Rodney Newton

    Robert Burns (1759-1796) was one of the most colourful literary figures of the 18th Century. The son of a tenant farmer, he was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, and earned a living variously as a farmer, flax dresser and exercise man, gradually establishing himself as a poet, lyricist and collector of folksongs. A charismatic character, by the time of his death he had become Scotland's best known and best-loved poet. This work depicts three characters from his personal life who also figure in his poetry. Although Burns intended much of his verse to be sung, and even wrote tunes himself for many of his lyrics, all the melodies in this work are original.I John AndersonJohn Anderson (1759-1832) was an Ayrshire carpenter and close friend to Robert Burns, who immortalised Anderson in his affectionate poem John Anderson Ma Jo, which imagines both men in old age (although Burns was only 37 when he died). Anderson is reputed to have made Robert Burns' coffin and survived the wrecking of the paddle steamer Cornet at Craignish Point near Oban during a storm in 1820, an event incorporated into this movement. This is a picture of a tough, resilient Scot who meets the storms of Life head-on.II Mary CampbellRobert Burns had numerous love affairs, sometimes with more than one woman at a time. Mary Campbell, a sailor's daughter from the highland district of Dunoon, had entered service with a family in Ayrshire when she met Burns. Although involved with another woman at the time, Burns was smitten with Campbell and there is evidence to suggest that he planned to emigrate to Jamaica with Mary. However, nothing came of this wild scheme and Mary, fearing disgrace and scandal left the area but not before Burns had enshrined her in at least two poems, Highland Mary and To Mary Campbell. Significantly, the first line of the latter runs, "Will ye go to the Indies, my Mary, and leave auld Scotia's Shore?" (His ardent pleading can be heard in the middle section of the movement). Mary's music paints a portrait of a graceful young lady who had the presence of mind not to be entirely won over by the charms of Robert Burns.III Douglas GrahamBurns was a heavy drinker, and this is most likely a contribution to his early death. He was matched in this capacity by his friend, Douglas ‘Tam' Graham, a farmer who sought solace in the bottle from an unhappy marriage. Burns used his drinking partner as a model for the comic poem, Tam O'Shanter, which tells of a drunken Ayrshire farmer who encounters a Witches' Sabbath and escapes with his life, but at the cost of his horse tail. The story was said to be made up by Graham himself to placate his fearsome, but very superstitious, wife after he arrived home one night, worse the wear for drink and with his old mare's tail cropped by some village prankster. This present piece depicts Tam enjoying a riotous night at a local hostilely in the company of his friends, John Anderson and ‘Rabbie' Burns.Rodney Newton - 2013

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £40.00 £40.00
    Buy from PHM Publishing

    FRANK BRIDGE - THE COMPLETE WORKS (print)

    FRANK BRIDGE - THE COMPLETE WORKS Portraits of English composer in his time, with full Thematic Catalog of Works (1900 - 1941), compiled and edited by Paul Hindmarsh Revised edition published in 2016 by PHM Publishing ? 2016 by Paul Hindmarsh 272pp, A4, Print version (? 40.00) available by pre-paid order via www.paulhindmarsh.com PHMB001print FRANK BRIDGE - THE COMPLETE WORKS is a major revision and update of my life and work of this English composer originally published by Faber Music in 1983. Frank Bridge - A Thematic Catalog charted the composer's intriguing creative journey from 1900, the year of his first surviving compositions were 61 in 1941. Much has changed with regard to Bridge research since 1983. His life and work has been the subject of many post-graduate research projects. All his major works have been recorded and are more widely performed. Bridge's music has been in the public domain since 2011. April 13, 2016, when the manuscript of Phantasie in F minor for string quartet (H.55) was discovered in the archive of theWorshipful Company of Musicians. After half a lifetime of writing about Bridge's life and work for journals, program previews and registration notes, I have a lot of writing and an extensive selection of correspondence by Bridge and his friends and some significant 'period' articles and images to create, I hope, a more complete picture of Frank Bridge inthe context of his time. I have also included full details of commercial recordings or each work (up to January 2016) within the chronological sequence. Paul Hindmarsh, April 2016 Contents Time line PART 1 Bridge in his time 1 Biographical sketch - Seeds of Discontent Paul Hindmarsh 2 The Good Old Days Ivor James (1941) 3 Memories of a unique friendship Daphne Oliver (1979) 4 Modern British Composers I: Frank Bridge Edwin Evans (1919) 5 An Interview with Frank Bridge P.J. Nolan (1923) 6 Frank Bridge Herbert Howells (1941) PART 2 The Complete Works 1 Introduction 2 Sources 3 Thematic Catalog of Works 1900-41 4 Classifieds Index of Works 5 Bibliography Jessica Chan and Paul Hindmarsh Index of titles and first lines General index

  • £95.00 £95.00
    Buy from Superbrass

    KirkFeld

    Grant Kirkhope Grant Kirkhope is a BAFTA nominated British composer who has created the soundtrack for video games that have sold in excess of 30 million copies. From “GoldenEye” to “Banjo-Kazooie”, “Viva Pi?ata” to “Donkey Kong”, “Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning” to “Civilization: Beyond Earth” and “Perfect Dark” to “Castle of Illusion starring Mickey Mouse”. He has also recently scored the feature film “The King’s Daughter” starring Pierce Brosnan and William Hurt and is currently working on “Yooka Laylee” and “Dropzone”. Grant’s score for “Viva Pi?ata” was nominated by BAFTA in the Original Score category in its 2007 awards. Grant is represented by the prestigious Gorfaine/Schwartz Agency by Cheryl Tiano and Kevin Korn. Grant has a degree in music from the Royal Northern College of Music, Manchester, where he majored in classical trumpet, is a green card holder and now lives in Agoura Hills, LA with his wife and two children. “Ian and I first met when we were around 15 years old. We both played in our county orchestra, the North Yorkshire Schools Symphony Orchestra (I was a trumpet player). I think we hit it off straight away, as we were definitely a couple of cheeky kids, if you know what I mean! We both ended up playing in Rowntree Mackintosh Brass Band for a while too which Ian’s Dad, Trevor conducted. We bumped into each other again when we both went for the Shell/LSO Scholarship. I got to the area finals in Manchester so I was pretty pleased with myself but then I saw Ian and I knew it was all over! Of course Ian went on to win and the rest is history. I saw him again when I was attending the Royal Northern College of Music around 1983 by which time Ian had just got the principal chair at the Halle Orchestra. Then I guess 30 something years went by as we both went about our lives and lost touch. We re-kindled our friendship due to his wife really. She emailed me to say it was Ian’s 50th birthday and she was collecting stories from all his friends over the years. After that we got back in touch and then one day on Facebook I got a message from him in typical dry Yorkshire fashion “now then Grant, I had a listen to your music and I think it’s good, how about writing a piece for me ?” I was a little bit unsure at first but of course I loved Ian’s playing and of course I said yes. Over a Skype call in 2016, he asked me what I thought I’d write. I said since I live in LA I’d like to write a “Hollywood” trombone piece. Imagine if John Williams had written a piece for solo trombone, that’s what I’d like to write - well I’d certainly like to try” – Grant Kirkhope