Searching for Wind Band Music? Visit the Wind Band Music Shop
We've found 4 matches for your search

Results

  • £12.50

    Of Whom I Sing Jeg Elsker Dig (Brass Band - Score only) - Grieg, Edvard - Ballantine, Leonard

    The original, Jeg elsker Dig, is a plaintive love song for voice and piano with words by Hans Christian Anderson; 'You have become thought of my thought, you are my heart's first love. I love you, as no one here on earth, I shall love you through time and eternity!'

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    Three Burns Portraits - Rodney Newton

    Robert Burns (1759-1796) was one of the most colourful literary figures of the 18th Century. The son of a tenant farmer, he was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, and earned a living variously as a farmer, flax dresser and exercise man, gradually establishing himself as a poet, lyricist and collector of folksongs. A charismatic character, by the time of his death he had become Scotland's best known and best-loved poet. This work depicts three characters from his personal life who also figure in his poetry. Although Burns intended much of his verse to be sung, and even wrote tunes himself for many of his lyrics, all the melodies in this work are original.I John AndersonJohn Anderson (1759-1832) was an Ayrshire carpenter and close friend to Robert Burns, who immortalised Anderson in his affectionate poem John Anderson Ma Jo, which imagines both men in old age (although Burns was only 37 when he died). Anderson is reputed to have made Robert Burns' coffin and survived the wrecking of the paddle steamer Cornet at Craignish Point near Oban during a storm in 1820, an event incorporated into this movement. This is a picture of a tough, resilient Scot who meets the storms of Life head-on.II Mary CampbellRobert Burns had numerous love affairs, sometimes with more than one woman at a time. Mary Campbell, a sailor's daughter from the highland district of Dunoon, had entered service with a family in Ayrshire when she met Burns. Although involved with another woman at the time, Burns was smitten with Campbell and there is evidence to suggest that he planned to emigrate to Jamaica with Mary. However, nothing came of this wild scheme and Mary, fearing disgrace and scandal left the area but not before Burns had enshrined her in at least two poems, Highland Mary and To Mary Campbell. Significantly, the first line of the latter runs, "Will ye go to the Indies, my Mary, and leave auld Scotia's Shore?" (His ardent pleading can be heard in the middle section of the movement). Mary's music paints a portrait of a graceful young lady who had the presence of mind not to be entirely won over by the charms of Robert Burns.III Douglas GrahamBurns was a heavy drinker, and this is most likely a contribution to his early death. He was matched in this capacity by his friend, Douglas ‘Tam' Graham, a farmer who sought solace in the bottle from an unhappy marriage. Burns used his drinking partner as a model for the comic poem, Tam O'Shanter, which tells of a drunken Ayrshire farmer who encounters a Witches' Sabbath and escapes with his life, but at the cost of his horse tail. The story was said to be made up by Graham himself to placate his fearsome, but very superstitious, wife after he arrived home one night, worse the wear for drink and with his old mare's tail cropped by some village prankster. This present piece depicts Tam enjoying a riotous night at a local hostilely in the company of his friends, John Anderson and ‘Rabbie' Burns.Rodney Newton - 2013

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £30.00

    National Express

    I first heard of the song National Express, which was in the British Top Ten in 1998, when my son Jon mentioned it last year. It was written and sung by Neil Hannon, with his group “The Divine Comedy”. Jon said that it would sound good played by a brass band. Tim Benson, solo trombone with Stannington Brass Band, also mentioned it on the internet forum, themouthpiece.com I spoke with Tim, and agreed to do a brass band arrangement with a special feature for solo trombone. In this arrangement, the solo trombone adds extra colour to a band arrangement which is a mixture of big band and country style. The trombone part is well within the capabilities of a good player. There is a comic element to this song, and the cornets and flugel contain an eight bar spoken part, which, if included, would enhance it’s entertainment value.Tim Benson took the music to rehearsal at Stannington Brass Band and it instantly became a hit with the band who left whistling the melody. The piece not only retains the fun of the original, but it cleverly uses the band, and a bit of additional vocals from the cornet section. “Tim Benson and the Stannington Brass Band would like to thank Tim Paton for the arrangement.” (Tim Benson).”National Express” is on Stannington Brass Band’s latest CD, “AND ALL THAT BRASS”, available from [email protected]”Pontins was brilliant… one of the highlights of my weekend was playing/performing National Express… absolutely belting arrangement Tim… I love it!” Message from Fiona, who performed with themouthpiece.com scratch band at the Pontins Brass Band Championships in Prestatyn.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £6.95

    Auld Lang Syne - Menno Haantjes

    Whereas 'Auld Lang Syne' may be considered the best-known Scottish song ever, yet at the same time it is an obscure one, for there are but few people who know the complete text by heart. After the familiar 'Should auld acquaintance be forgot .....' many people take their refuge to lyrics like 'rum tee dum ta dee ..... lah, lah, lah ........... for auld lang syne'. Even in Scotland only a handful of persons know the entire text and are able to give a correct rendering of it. The current lyrics have been attributed to the Scottish poet Robert Burns. Burns, however, he did not write the whole poem : after he had heard an old man sing the centuries-old Scotch ballad, he wrote it down and added a number of stanzas (1788). Historical research teaches us that the ballad served many purposes, both political and religious. Nowadays, 'Auld Lang Syne' is sung as a Christmas Carol and it is also sung on New Year's Eve at the turning of the year. Apart from that, though, the song is also sung on many other occasions - sometimes with different lyrics, which usually have Love, Friendship and/or Parting as their themes, as these go well with the fascinating melody. In this arrangement a low-sounding solo instrument is central. The harmonization in the accompaniment fits in perfectly with the sentiments this song will evoke. Should auld acquaintance be forgot And never brought to mind? Should auld acquintance be forgot. And days of auld lang syne? For auld lang syne, my dear, For auld lang syne, We'll take a cup of kindness yet, For auld lang syne.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

     PDF View Music