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  • £27.50

    One Foot in the Grave - Eric Idle

    Eb Bass Solo with Brass BandI Don't Believe it!Yes 'AaA" that wonderful theme from One Foot in the Grave has been crying out to be arranged as a bass solo. Now it has 'AaA" an absolute winner with audiences.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £27.50

    One Foot in the Grave - Idle, E - Barry, D

    I Don’t Believe it!Yes – that wonderful theme from One Foot in the Grave has been crying out to be arranged as a bass solo. Now it has – an absolute winner with audiences.4th section +

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £27.50
  • £19.50

    Sing For Victory - Various - Alan Beaumont

    Nothing beats a good March, however this number is one with a difference. This perfect concert item takes three of the best well-known war-time songs and delivers them into a foot tapping entertaining item for your band and audience to enjoy. Featuring the popular numbers 'Pack up Your Troubles in Your Old Kit Bag', 'It's a Long Way To Tipperary' and 'Over There', your audience will have a hard time resisting the urge to sing along. A must for all bands in this year of commemoration and perfect for either the bandstand or concert hall.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £29.95

    Flame of Independence - Dan Price

    Given as a gift to the United States of America from the people of France, The Statue of Liberty is one of the most recognizable icons of the United States world-wide, and is also a universal symbol of freedom and democracy.Dedicated on October 28, 1886, The Statue of Liberty commemorates the centennial of the signing of the United States Declaration of Independence and is a gesture of friendship from France to the United States.Standing on Liberty Island in New York Harbour, the 305 feet tall, copper-clad statue is that of a robed woman holding a torch. It is made from sheet copper (which gives it, its distinctive colour) over a framework of steel, with the exception of the torch flame which is coated in gold leaf. It stands on top of a rectangular stonework pedestal with a foundation in the shape of an irregular eleven-pointed star.The figure is derived from Libertas, ancient Rome's goddess of freedom from slavery, oppression, and tyranny. Her left foot, fitted in Roman sandals, tramples broken shackles, symbolizing freedom from oppression and tyranny, while her raised right foot symbolizes Liberty and Freedom refusing to stand still. Her torch signifies enlightenment. The tablet in her hand represents knowledge and shows the date of the Declaration of Independence--July 4, 1776. The seven spikes on the crown represent the seven seas and seven continents. Visually, 'Liberty' appears to draw inspiration from Greek Sun-god Helios, and I have drawn my inspiration from 'Liberty'.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £34.95

    The Descent

    The Descent takes its inspiration from Victorian author Jules Verne; specifically, his work Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea.In Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, Professor Arronax finds himself a prisoner of the mysterious Captain Nemo, on a remarkable submarine called the Nautilus. Nemo is one of Verne's most memorable characters. He's a man who has turned his back on the world, and his name - Nemo - means 'No Man.' He has vowed never to set foot on dry land ever again. Verne gives his hero's brilliance and benevolence a dark underside - the man's obsessive hate for Empires and Imperialism. Captain Nemo is a genius, an engineer, an artist, an athlete, sometimes a pacifist, sometimes a righter of wrongs, sometimes an out and out villain, and he invented the Nautilus.The Descent is based on the idea of a descent to the depths of the ocean in the Nautilus with Captain Nemo, with the cornet soloist expressing both the anguish and reflective sides of the character. On one hand, a troubled and agitated figure, juxtaposed with the reflective memories of his homeland, children, mother and father. The work was written for and commissioned by Flowers Band as part of their programme of music at Brass in Concert 2019.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £65.00

    AN ELGAR PORTRAIT - D.Price

    This work was composed in commemoration of the 150th Anniversary of the birth English Composer Sir Edward Elgar. The suite is in three movements: 'Introduction', 'Elegy' and 'March', each of which have been inspired by three of Elgar's most celebrated works; Chanson de Matin, Nimrod ('Variation IX' from the Enigma Variations) and Pomp and Circumstance No.1.'Introduction' - Hollybush HillHollybush Hill is the name of one of the peaks of the Malvern Hills in Worcestershire. The Malverns were a favourite walking area for Elgar and his wife, and their panoramic views inspired much of Elgar's music.'Elegy' - BroadheathBroadheath is the small village at the foot of the Malvern Hills where Elgar was born (and lived at various times throughout his life). Elgar is buried not far from Broadheath at St Wulstan's in Little Malvern. 'March' - Worcester CathedralMany of the Worcestershire ensembles and music festivals played an important role in Elgar's early musical education. He was heavily involved in The Three Choirs Festival and either conducted or played in many of the light orchestras and vocal groups that performed at venues across Worcester. A statue of Elgar overlooks the Cathedral at the end of Worcester High Street.An Elgar Portrait has been used regularly as an own-choice test-piece for Section 4 bands, and was also selected as the set work for the Swiss National Championships in 2007 as well as the Pontins Championships in 2008. The composer has slightly reworked this piece for the Section 4 Final of the National Brass Band Championships of Great Britain 2020 and it's this version that should be performed at the contest. If bands currently have an older version in their libraries, please contact us directly for more information.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £84.95

    Cornet Concerto (Gregson) (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Gregson, Edward

    The Cornet Concerto was commissioned by Black Dyke Band for their principal cornet, Richard Marshall, and was premiered at the European Brass Band Festival’s Gala Concert in Lille, France, on 30 April 2016 by the same performers, conducted by Nicholas Childs.It is challenging work, both musically and technically, and one that exploits the wide range of the instrument’s capabilities. Lasting for some 17 minutes, it is in the usual three movements: Sonata, Intermezzo (subtitled ‘Of More Distant Memories’) and Rondo.The first movement presents four main ideas:Cadenzas (which recur throughout the movement, and indeed appear at the end of the work); a fast and rhythmically energetic motive; Bugle calls (echoing the ancestor of the cornet), and a lyrical and expressive melody, full of yearning. These four ideas are juxtaposed within the broad shape of a Sonata form structure, although here the word ‘Sonata’ is used in its original meaning of ‘sounding together’.The second movement is music in search of a theme, which eventually comes at the end of the movement. In the middle section there are brief quotations, albeit mostly hidden, from three cornet solos written by the Swedish/American composer Erik Leidzen for the Salvation Army in the 1940s and 50s; these are solos I loved as a teenager, and my use of them is by way of tribute, not imitation – a sort of memory bank, just as the main theme of the movement, when it eventually comes, is reminiscent of the tune from my earlier work for brass band, ‘Of Distant Memories’.The final Rondo, the shortest of the three movements, is a lively and ‘fleet-of foot’ Scherzo, its main theme full of cascading arpeggios, but with a contrasting lyrical second theme intertwined in the structure. There is much interplay between soloist and band in the development of the music, but eventually a brief reprise of the opening cadenzas leads to an exciting and climactic coda.Click here for the piano reduction

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £39.95

    Cornet Concerto (Gregson) (Brass Band - Score only) - Gregson, Edward

    The Cornet Concerto was commissioned by Black Dyke Band for their principal cornet, Richard Marshall, and was premiered at the European Brass Band Festival’s Gala Concert in Lille, France, on 30 April 2016 by the same performers, conducted by Nicholas Childs.It is challenging work, both musically and technically, and one that exploits the wide range of the instrument’s capabilities. Lasting for some 17 minutes, it is in the usual three movements: Sonata, Intermezzo (subtitled ‘Of More Distant Memories’) and Rondo.The first movement presents four main ideas:Cadenzas (which recur throughout the movement, and indeed appear at the end of the work); a fast and rhythmically energetic motive; Bugle calls (echoing the ancestor of the cornet), and a lyrical and expressive melody, full of yearning. These four ideas are juxtaposed within the broad shape of a Sonata form structure, although here the word ‘Sonata’ is used in its original meaning of ‘sounding together’.The second movement is music in search of a theme, which eventually comes at the end of the movement. In the middle section there are brief quotations, albeit mostly hidden, from three cornet solos written by the Swedish/American composer Erik Leidzen for the Salvation Army in the 1940s and 50s; these are solos I loved as a teenager, and my use of them is by way of tribute, not imitation – a sort of memory bank, just as the main theme of the movement, when it eventually comes, is reminiscent of the tune from my earlier work for brass band, ‘Of Distant Memories’.The final Rondo, the shortest of the three movements, is a lively and ‘fleet-of foot’ Scherzo, its main theme full of cascading arpeggios, but with a contrasting lyrical second theme intertwined in the structure. There is much interplay between soloist and band in the development of the music, but eventually a brief reprise of the opening cadenzas leads to an exciting and climactic coda.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £25.00

    GREAT GATE OF KIEV, The (from Pictures at an Exhibition) (Brass Band) - Mussorgsky, Modest - Littlemore, Phillip

    Modest Mussorgsky was a close friend of the young artist and architect Victor Hartmann, and his death in 1873 plunged Mossorgsky into a deep depression. The following year a memorial exhibition in St. Petersburg displayed Hartmann's paintings, costumes, architectural designs and sketches. Mussorgsky's visit to it, combined with his desire to write a piece in his friend's memory, inspired him to compose hisPictures At An Exhibitionfor piano. A suite of ten movements, with a recurring Promenade theme, it is one of the composer's most famous works and regarded as a showpiece for virtuoso pianists. It is perhaps the orchestral transcription made by Maurice Ravel in 1922 that is now the most famous version of it. This arrangement opens with a brief excerpt fromThe Hut on Fowl's Legs, which was based on a painting of an elaborately carved clock depicting Baba Yaga, a horrible tiny witch that feasts on human bones. The tenth, and final picture in Mussorgsky's masterpiece is commonly referred to asThe Great Gate of Kiev, although it's literal translation is The Bogatyr Gates ??" a Bogatyr being a hero figure in medieval East Slavic legend. It features a grand main theme that is interspersed with a more solemn hymn-like secondary theme. The work closes with a grand final rendition of the Promenade theme that almost grinds to a halt at what must be the foot of what were to be magnificent ceremonial gates (although they were never actually built!). Duration: 6:00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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