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  • £59.95

    RHAPSODY ON A THEME BY PURCELL (Brass Band Set) - Kevin Norbury

    The theme is the rondo refrain from 'Abdelazer' famously used by Benjamin Britten in his 'The Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra'. The composer, while keeping a spirit of fun, pays subtle tribute to both Purcell and Britten in this set of linked variations.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    MARCH OF THE HOURS (Brass Band Set) - Emil Soderstrom

    March of the Hours was first performed at Star Lake Music Camp in 1962 with the composer supplying an informative listening guide which was printed in the published score; "The phrases are of 12 crotchets each (three bars) signifying the 12 hours. Up to the trio, the music describes the headlong search for pleasure by the thoughtless. Abruptly, the trio brings 'I need thee every hour', but an episode employing the original theme pushes it aside until it reappears, this time against a background of chimes of the full hour (Westminster chimes). While the hour strikes 12, a paraphrase of the opening strains of 'When the trumpet of the Lord shall sound and time shall be no more' is heard. Here the music stops, to be followed by the trumpet sounding (cornets and trombones) and the rest of the band responds with 'When the roll is called up yonder' with a final 'I'll be there'."

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    March Of The Hours (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Soderstrom, Emil

    March of the Hours was first performed at Star Lake Music Camp in 1962 with the composer supplying an informative listening guide which was printed in the published score; "The phrases are of 12 crotchets each (three bars) signifying the 12 hours. Up to the trio, the music describes the headlong search for pleasure by the thoughtless. Abruptly, the trio brings 'I need thee every hour', but an episode employing the original theme pushes it aside until it reappears, this time against a background of chimes of the full hour (Westminster chimes). While the hour strikes 12, a paraphrase of the opening strains of 'When the trumpet of the Lord shall sound and time shall be no more' is heard. Here the music stops, to be followed by the trumpet sounding (cornets and trombones) and the rest of the band responds with 'When the roll is called up yonder' with a final 'I'll be there'."

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £17.50

    March Of The Hours (Brass Band - Score only) - Soderstrom, Emil

    March of the Hours was first performed at Star Lake Music Camp in 1962 with the composer supplying an informative listening guide which was printed in the published score; "The phrases are of 12 crotchets each (three bars) signifying the 12 hours. Up to the trio, the music describes the headlong search for pleasure by the thoughtless. Abruptly, the trio brings 'I need thee every hour', but an episode employing the original theme pushes it aside until it reappears, this time against a background of chimes of the full hour (Westminster chimes). While the hour strikes 12, a paraphrase of the opening strains of 'When the trumpet of the Lord shall sound and time shall be no more' is heard. Here the music stops, to be followed by the trumpet sounding (cornets and trombones) and the rest of the band responds with 'When the roll is called up yonder' with a final 'I'll be there'."

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £13.95

    Go for Brass! - Jacob de Haan

    Subtitled "A Young Person's Guide to the Brass Band", Go for Brass! is a musical introduction to the sound, instrumental groups and the individual instruments of the brass band. Your players will love this work as they stand to highlight their particular section with snippets of the sparkling up-tempo dance style theme. An extremely entertaining concert item with a little fun educational content!

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £44.95

    Festiva Brazilia - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Using a variety of Latin American musical influences the piece opens with a bass riff that is to be the prominent feature in this work. Accompanied with lively Latin American Samba Percussion section the work is reminiscent of the music heard at the world famous Rio Carnival. There are lots of Latin ‘Riffs’ and ‘Licks’ throughout the piece that keep returning in true samba style. This is a real fun piece to perform and the performing notes below act as a guide to getting the most out of this performance.Performing Notes:There are opportunities for soloists within the piece, particularly Solo Cornet, Soprano and Bongo’s.When the Cornet and Soprano soloist play their solo part they have an instruction to stand out at the front to perform. It is at the players and conductors discretion where they would like to stand for their solo line.Obviously the Drum Kit soloist is restricted to their current positioning within the band. However, the other percussionists are quite at liberty to come out to the front of the band to perform their solo at rehearsal figure P at the conductors discretion.NB – At the 5th bar of figure P there is an optional repeat section. Performers can repeat this section over and over to extend the percussion feature. Or even add more players from the band to play percussion. If you do not wish to use this opportunity then dismiss the repeat so that there is a 16 bar section between figure P and figure R.There are also a variety of cameo roles for other soloists and musical sections during the piece. Other players and sections can stand to perform various motifs during the piece again at the conductor’s discretion.Festiva Brazilia was composed for performers to have fun and enjoy performing the piece as much as possible. Just like the many Samba festivals around Brazil.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £74.95

    Eden - John Pickard

    This work was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the final of the 2005 Besson National Brass Band Championship, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London.The score is prefaced by the final lines from Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost (completed in 1663), in which Adam and Eve, expelled from Paradise, make their uncertain way into the outside world:“…The world was all before them, where to chooseTheir place of rest, and providence their guide:They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow,Through Eden took their solitary way.”My work is in three linked sections. In the first, the characters of Adam, Eve and the serpent guarding the Tree of Knowledge are respectively represented by solo euphonium, cornet and trombone. The music opens in an idyllic and tranquil mood and leads into a duet between euphonium and cornet. Throughout this passage the prevailing mood darkens, though the soloists seem to remain oblivious to the increasingly fraught atmosphere. A whip-crack announces the malevolent appearance of the solo trombone who proceeds to engage the solo cornet in a sinister dialogue.The second section interprets the Eden story as a modern metaphor for the havoc mankind has inflicted upon the world, exploiting and abusing its resources in the pursuit of wealth. Though certainly intended here as a comment on the present-day, it is by no means a new idea: Milton himself had an almost prescient awareness of it in Book I of his poem, where men, led on by Mammon:“…Ransacked the centre and with impious handsRifled the bowels of their mother earthFor treasures better hid. Soon had his crewOpened into the hill a spacious woundAnd digged out ribs of gold.”So this section is fast and violent, at times almost manic in its destructive energy. At length a furious climax subsides and a tolling bell ushers in the third and final section.This final part is slow, beginning with an intense lament featuring solos for tenor-horn, fl?gel-horn and repiano cornet and joined later by solo baritone, soprano cornet, Eb-bass and Bb-bass.At one stage in the planning of the work it seemed likely that the music would end here – in despair. Then, mid-way through writing it, I visited the extraordinary Eden Project in Cornwall. Here, in a disused quarry – a huge man-made wound in the earth – immense biomes, containing an abundance of plant species from every region of the globe, together with an inspirational education programme, perhaps offer a small ray of hope for the future. This is the image behind the work’s conclusion and the optimism it aims to express is real enough, though it is hard-won and challenged to the last.John Pickard 2005

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £74.95

    Eden - Score & Parts - John Pickard

    This work was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the final of the 2005 Besson National Brass Band Championship, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London.The score is prefaced by the final lines from Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost (completed in 1663), in which Adam and Eve, expelled from Paradise, make their uncertain way into the outside world:“…The world was all before them, where to chooseTheir place of rest, and providence their guide:They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow,Through Eden took their solitary way.”My work is in three linked sections. In the first, the characters of Adam, Eve and the serpent guarding the Tree of Knowledge are respectively represented by solo euphonium, cornet and trombone. The music opens in an idyllic and tranquil mood and leads into a duet between euphonium and cornet. Throughout this passage the prevailing mood darkens, though the soloists seem to remain oblivious to the increasingly fraught atmosphere. A whip-crack announces the malevolent appearance of the solo trombone who proceeds to engage the solo cornet in a sinister dialogue.The second section interprets the Eden story as a modern metaphor for the havoc mankind has inflicted upon the world, exploiting and abusing its resources in the pursuit of wealth. Though certainly intended here as a comment on the present-day, it is by no means a new idea: Milton himself had an almost prescient awareness of it in Book I of his poem, where men, led on by Mammon:“…Ransacked the centre and with impious handsRifled the bowels of their mother earthFor treasures better hid. Soon had his crewOpened into the hill a spacious woundAnd digged out ribs of gold.”So this section is fast and violent, at times almost manic in its destructive energy. At length a furious climax subsides and a tolling bell ushers in the third and final section.This final part is slow, beginning with an intense lament featuring solos for tenor-horn, fl?gel-horn and repiano cornet and joined later by solo baritone, soprano cornet, Eb-bass and Bb-bass.At one stage in the planning of the work it seemed likely that the music would end here – in despair. Then, mid-way through writing it, I visited the extraordinary Eden Project in Cornwall. Here, in a disused quarry – a huge man-made wound in the earth – immense biomes, containing an abundance of plant species from every region of the globe, together with an inspirational education programme, perhaps offer a small ray of hope for the future. This is the image behind the work’s conclusion and the optimism it aims to express is real enough, though it is hard-won and challenged to the last.John Pickard 2005

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £59.95

    Blitz - Derek Bourgeois

    The dictionary definition of Blitz is any sudden, overwhelming attack, particularly from the air. It is shortened form of the German word Blitzkrieg, literally meaning a lightning war.The piece is a test of skill, nerve and stamina, culminating in an aural ‘Blitz’ of great ferocity.The tempo markings in this piece are intended merely as a guide to performers. The composer is particularly anxious that they should not be considered inviolate.Commissioned with funds provided by the Arts Council of Great Britain for the finals of National Brass Band Championships held in the Royal Albert Hall, London, on the 3rd October, 1981.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    Diversions after Henry Purcell - Jonathan Bates

    Composed for Robert Childs and the Foden's Band, this work sets out, in sentiment, to imitate Benjamin Britten's, The Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra. The music takes inspiration from the life and works of Henry Purcell - a composer synonymous with brass through his compositions for the court. It features every section of the brass band in a variety of styles, in anticipation of a triumphant Fugue.I - Pride & Prejudice: In much the same way as Britten's ‘Young Person's Guide' the work begins with Purcell's famous Rondeau, music used in several period screen settings, including the adaptation of Jane Austen's beloved novel, Pride & Prejudice.II - Devil's Acre refers to Purcell's birthplace, Westminster and showcases devilish technique from the cornet section.III - The Royal Organist features the horn section, and whilst the music takes its inspiration from Purcell's Te Deum, its title comes from a painting at Westminster Abbey, where Purcell himself was organist for many years.IV - "Full Fathom Five" features the virtuosity and range of the euphonium and baritone section and takes its title from music Purcell wrote for Shakespeare's play, The Tempest. It is a catchphrase deriving from a verse passage, beginning with those words, during a storm and shipwreck, where the water is about 30 feet (five fathoms) deep.V - Remember Me is the subtitle of Dido's Lament from Dido and Aeneas - Purcell's first opera. Here the trombones and basses remember Purcell, who passed away at the young age of 36.VI - That Blessed Place is reflective and takes its title from Purcell's epitaph at Westminster, which reads: "Here lies Henry Purcell Esq., who left this life and is gone to that Blessed Place where only His harmony can be exceeded."VII - Celebration takes the form of a Fugue and eventually brings the music to a close in much the same way as it started, with a grand reprise of Purcell's famous Rondeau.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days