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    Stories From The Steel City - Jonathan Bates

    In 2013, Deepcar Brass Band, based in the north of Sheffield at the foot of the Pennines, celebrated their 25th Anniversary year. To that end, they commissioned the upcoming composer Jonathan Bates to pen a new work for the band that reflected not only the band’s triumphant milestone, but also the history of the steel city. This exciting work features a variety of styles and has an interlude that hears the sounds of metal being clanged to conjure up images of the cities steelwork heritage. Jonathan Bates has since gone on to compose for many of the country’s top bands and all his works see success with melodic lines and skilful use of the brass band colours.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £21.50

    Don't You Want Me (Baby) - The Human League - Gavin Somerset

    Originally released in 1981, this single by The Human League took the took the Christmas No.1 spot and has since gone on to sell over 1.5 million copies, making it the 23rd most successful single in British history. The music has easily stood the test of time, with many still seeing the track as a firm favourite for parties. Now for the first time, the work is available for band. This is a great way to show off a brass band’s versatility and reach out to audiences of all ages. Something different and a must have.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £44.95

    The Golden Apples of the Sun - Rodney Newton

    This work was commissioned in 2012 by the percussionist, Yasuaki Fukuhara, and takes its title from the final verse of W.B.Yeats' poem, The Song of Wandering Aengus;Though I am old with wandering,Through hollow lands and hilly lands,I will find out where she has gone,And kiss her lips and take her hands;And walk among long dappled grass,And pluck till time and times are done,The silver apples of the moon,The golden apples of the sun.This piece does not seek to follow the narrative of the poem, but rather takes lines from it as an inspiration for three contrasting movements.The first movement, Through Hollow Lands and Hilly Lands, is in the form of a dogged march over a repeated bass line, featuring tom-toms, snare drum and cymbals playing rhythms associated with rock drumming. At the end of the movement, the marimba enters with material that will be heard in the next movement.The second movement, The Silver Apples of the Moon, features vibraphone, glockenspiel and crotales, as well as the dobachi (a resonant bronze bowl of Japanese origin). The music is delicate and ethereal.In contrast, the final movement, The Golden Apples of the Sun, is energetic and fiery, featuring tubular bells, timpani and other tuned percussion instruments including cowbells.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £25.00 £25.00
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    Scarlett O'Hara - Jerry Lordan - Len Jenkins

    Named after the central character in Margaret Mitchell's 'Gone with the Wind", Scarlett O'Hara was written by Jerry Lordan and first released by former Shadows' bass player Jet Harris and drummer Tony Meehan in 1963. It followed their chart??"topping success "Diamonds" by the same composer earlier that year and an arrangement for brass band for that number is also available from Wobbleco Music. Whilst originally featuring Harris leading on an electric guitar, and Meehan on drums, both of the arrangements for brass seek to capture the characteristic style of 60's rock music and retain the signature drum solos for which they are rightly remembered.

  • £45.00

    Bathgate Hills Trilogy - Andrew Duncan

    Composed by Andrew Duncan and written for the West Lothian Schools Band, A Bathgate Hills Trilogy is in three movements, each one dedicated to and representing a different hill.Comments from the composer:Movement 1 – Dechmont LawThe first movement describes the peculiar events which took place in November 1979 when a forestry worker, Bob Taylor, had a close encounter with an alien spacecraft in Dechmont Woods at the bottom of Dechmont Hill. Bob Taylor’s account from the time describes a large sphere like object about twenty feet across which pulled him by the legs towards it, caustic smoke then caused him to pass out. He awoke a short time later in the same spot but the spaceship had gone leaving behind marks in the soil. His story caused a great deal of media interest and a great deal of excitement in the local community.Movement 2 – The Knock HillThe Term ‘Knock’ is Scottish Gaelic for ‘hill’ and the Knock Hill is the highest peak in the Bathgate Hills being 305 metres above Sea Level. On a clear day the Knock hill has excellent views of the Bass Rock to the East and the distant hills of Arran to the West as well as of the whole of West Lothian and across the Firth of Forth to Fife and beyond to the North.The second movement is a description of a leisurely walk to the summit of this hill and the enjoyment of a pleasant summer’s day spent walking and taking in the beautiful panoramic views. However, as is the case with the Scottish Summer, a change in the weather finds a clear blue sky being replaced with dark rain clouds. The changed weather brings a sudden brief but unwelcome cold downpour of rain, drenching anyone out walking! Finally, the clouds pass and the more pleasant summer weather returns.Movement 3 – Cairnpapple HillCairnpapple Hill is a near neighbour of the Knock Hill. It is almost as high but interest in Cairnpapple Hill lies in the outstanding archaeological monument near the summit, an Iron Age burial chamber. The chamber dates back to 25 years BC and was built by a mysterious people known as the Beaker People (so called because they left behind a number of large earthenware beakers). The mysteries of Cairnpapple Hill have always been a source of fascination for me ever since first visiting the hill as a school child.The third movement describes the lives of the Beaker People. The landscape they would have looked out on would have been mostly dense forest which would have contained many perils including dangerous wolves and bears. Life was harsh and short for the Beaker People and they would always have been close to danger and to death. The average life expectancy for the Beaker People was only 31 years of age. The summit of the hill would have been clear of forest and would have afforded the Beaker People some protection as they could see all around the near countryside enabling them to keep a watchful lookout for their enemies – both animal and human!

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £34.95

    Diversions after Henry Purcell - Jonathan Bates

    Composed for Robert Childs and the Foden's Band, this work sets out, in sentiment, to imitate Benjamin Britten's, The Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra. The music takes inspiration from the life and works of Henry Purcell - a composer synonymous with brass through his compositions for the court. It features every section of the brass band in a variety of styles, in anticipation of a triumphant Fugue.I - Pride & Prejudice: In much the same way as Britten's ‘Young Person's Guide' the work begins with Purcell's famous Rondeau, music used in several period screen settings, including the adaptation of Jane Austen's beloved novel, Pride & Prejudice.II - Devil's Acre refers to Purcell's birthplace, Westminster and showcases devilish technique from the cornet section.III - The Royal Organist features the horn section, and whilst the music takes its inspiration from Purcell's Te Deum, its title comes from a painting at Westminster Abbey, where Purcell himself was organist for many years.IV - "Full Fathom Five" features the virtuosity and range of the euphonium and baritone section and takes its title from music Purcell wrote for Shakespeare's play, The Tempest. It is a catchphrase deriving from a verse passage, beginning with those words, during a storm and shipwreck, where the water is about 30 feet (five fathoms) deep.V - Remember Me is the subtitle of Dido's Lament from Dido and Aeneas - Purcell's first opera. Here the trombones and basses remember Purcell, who passed away at the young age of 36.VI - That Blessed Place is reflective and takes its title from Purcell's epitaph at Westminster, which reads: "Here lies Henry Purcell Esq., who left this life and is gone to that Blessed Place where only His harmony can be exceeded."VII - Celebration takes the form of a Fugue and eventually brings the music to a close in much the same way as it started, with a grand reprise of Purcell's famous Rondeau.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £32.00

    Cityscapes (Score only) - Stephen Bulla

    The music of Cityscapes intends to parallel the impressions, sights, and sounds of a modern city to what a painter might convey with a landscape portrait. 'Morning Scene - Awakening': the quiet solitude of a sunrise, birdsong, and empty streets can betray the crowded jungle of city life. These are the last moments of sleep before the alarm goes off and the coffee goes on. 'Faces in Motion': The pavements come alive, streets fill with cars, office buildings open, the rush hour is on - and everyone is late! 'Museum Visit': To step into a museum is to visit another world. Looking at what we've been and where we've been, there's always a sense of awe at how much has gone before; and the realisation of how much there is yet to come... 'Nightlife': After hours is not the time to slow down, for the city never really sleeps. Nightclubs open, and the jazz circuit is alive with swinging sounds. This is the soul of the city. Duration: 12:00

    Estimated delivery 7-10 days
  • £42.00

    Cityscapes (Parts only) - Stephen Bulla

    The music of Cityscapes intends to parallel the impressions, sights, and sounds of a modern city to what a painter might convey with a landscape portrait. 'Morning Scene - Awakening': the quiet solitude of a sunrise, birdsong, and empty streets can betray the crowded jungle of city life. These are the last moments of sleep before the alarm goes off and the coffee goes on. 'Faces in Motion': The pavements come alive, streets fill with cars, office buildings open, the rush hour is on - and everyone is late! 'Museum Visit': To step into a museum is to visit another world. Looking at what we've been and where we've been, there's always a sense of awe at how much has gone before; and the realisation of how much there is yet to come... 'Nightlife': After hours is not the time to slow down, for the city never really sleeps. Nightclubs open, and the jazz circuit is alive with swinging sounds. This is the soul of the city. Duration: 12:00

    Estimated delivery 7-10 days