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  • £72.00

    Easy Peasy - Suite in Five Movements - Hilde Hoyvik Dahl

    This suite is written for beginning band at grade level 1. It consists of five short movements of various style. You may perform the movements as single pieces. The composition consist basically of three voices to make it playable also for smaller ensembles.However, it's preferable that trumpet/cornets play part no. 1 and clarinets play part no. 2 when necessary.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £52.00

    Fantasie Concertante (Score only) - Philip Wilby

    This exciting new concerto is a welcome addition to the repertoire of french and tenor horn players alike. Like the 18th-Century Serenade form there are five movements, arranged symmetrically around a slow movement - Soliloquy - which separates movements entitled Burlesque (two) and Valse Caprice (three) respectively. The first and last movements share common material of a more symphonic stature, and the concerto ends with a brisk fugato. The solo horn is (in the band version) accompanied by a quintet of solo players (two cornets, euphonium, trombone, and tuba) who provide the lion's share of the counterpoint and contrast with the main body of musicians who provide musical punctuation in the more sonorous tutti sections. The first movement, Don Quixote's Dream, contains references to Cervantes' famous hero, the Spanish nature of his stories, and the ambling gait of his horseback adventures.

    Estimated delivery 7-10 days
  • £66.00

    Fantasie Concertante (Parts only) - Philip Wilby

    This exciting new concerto is a welcome addition to the repertoire of french and tenor horn players alike. Like the 18th-Century Serenade form there are five movements, arranged symmetrically around a slow movement - Soliloquy - which separates movements entitled Burlesque (two) and Valse Caprice (three) respectively. The first and last movements share common material of a more symphonic stature, and the concerto ends with a brisk fugato. The solo horn is (in the band version) accompanied by a quintet of solo players (two cornets, euphonium, trombone, and tuba) who provide the lion's share of the counterpoint and contrast with the main body of musicians who provide musical punctuation in the more sonorous tutti sections. The first movement, Don Quixote's Dream, contains references to Cervantes' famous hero, the Spanish nature of his stories, and the ambling gait of his horseback adventures.

    Estimated delivery 7-10 days
  • £52.00

    Montage (Score only) - Peter Graham

    Each of the movements of the symphony take as their starting point forms originating in music of the 16th and 17th centuries. The first, an intrada, introduces the main thematic material (based on the interval of a minor third) in its embryonic state. As the piece progresses, this material is developed and manipulated in a variety of ways. The interval of the third remains central to the overall scheme of the work, even unifying the three movements on a tonal plane (I: F (minor); II: A flat (major); III: C flat (minor). The internal structure of the intrada is an arch form: ABCBA, roughly modelled on the first movement of Concerto for Orchestra by Witold Lutoslawski, to whose memory the movement is dedicated. A chaconne follows - the basic material now transformed into expansive solo lines underpinned by a recurring sequence of five chords (again, a third apart). The movement's structure combines both ternary form and golden section principles and the chaconne's continuous cycle of chords may be visualised as circles. The final movement, a rondo, bears the dramatic weight of the entire work, as the underlying tonal tensions surface. A musical journey ensues, making diversions through lyrical territories as well as through more spiky, jazz-flavoured ones. The aural (and visual) montage is perhaps most apparent towards the climax of the piece, where three keys and polyrhythms sound simultaneously in the upper brass, xylophone, horns, and timpani. The climax itself combines the lyrical music heard earlier with the rondo theme, now presented by cornets and trombones in canon. The teleological thrust of the movement (if not the entire work) can be symbolized by the flight of an arrow, as it steers a predetermined course towards its target. Duration: 16:00

    Estimated delivery 7-10 days
  • £64.00

    Montage (Parts only) - Peter Graham

    Each of the movements of the symphony take as their starting point forms originating in music of the 16th and 17th centuries. The first, an intrada, introduces the main thematic material (based on the interval of a minor third) in its embryonic state. As the piece progresses, this material is developed and manipulated in a variety of ways. The interval of the third remains central to the overall scheme of the work, even unifying the three movements on a tonal plane (I: F (minor); II: A flat (major); III: C flat (minor). The internal structure of the intrada is an arch form: ABCBA, roughly modelled on the first movement of Concerto for Orchestra by Witold Lutoslawski, to whose memory the movement is dedicated. A chaconne follows - the basic material now transformed into expansive solo lines underpinned by a recurring sequence of five chords (again, a third apart). The movement's structure combines both ternary form and golden section principles and the chaconne's continuous cycle of chords may be visualised as circles. The final movement, a rondo, bears the dramatic weight of the entire work, as the underlying tonal tensions surface. A musical journey ensues, making diversions through lyrical territories as well as through more spiky, jazz-flavoured ones. The aural (and visual) montage is perhaps most apparent towards the climax of the piece, where three keys and polyrhythms sound simultaneously in the upper brass, xylophone, horns, and timpani. The climax itself combines the lyrical music heard earlier with the rondo theme, now presented by cornets and trombones in canon. The teleological thrust of the movement (if not the entire work) can be symbolized by the flight of an arrow, as it steers a predetermined course towards its target. Duration: 16:00

    Estimated delivery 7-10 days
  • £94.00

    Montage - Peter Graham

    Each of the movements of the symphony take as their starting point forms originating in music of the 16th and 17th centuries.The first, an intrada, introduces the main thematic material (based on the interval of a minor third) in its embryonic state. As the piece progresses, this material is developed and manipulated in a variety of ways. The interval of the third remains central to the overall scheme of the work, even unifying the three movements on a tonal plane (I: F (minor); II: A flat (major); III: C flat (minor). The internal structure of the intrada is an arch form: ABCBA, roughly modelled on the first movement of Concerto for Orchestra by Witold Lutoslawski, to whose memory the movement is dedicated.A chaconne follows – the basic material now transformed into expansive solo lines underpinned by a recurring sequence of five chords (again, a third apart). The movement’s structure combines both ternary form and golden section principles and the chaconne’s continuous cycle of chords may be visualised as circles.The final movement, a rondo, bears the dramatic weight of the entire work, as the underlying tonal tensions surface. A musical journey ensues, making diversions through lyrical territories as well as through more spiky, jazz-flavoured ones. The aural (and visual) montage is perhaps most apparent towards the climax of the piece, where three keys and polyrhythms sound simultaneously in the upper brass, xylophone, horns, and timpani. The climax itself combines the lyrical music heard earlier with the rondo theme, now presented by cornets and trombones in canon.The teleological thrust of the movement (if not the entire work) can be symbolized by the flight of an arrow, as it steers a predetermined course towards its target.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £59.95

    Variations on an Enigma - Score and Parts - Philip Sparke

    Variations on an Enigma was commissioned by Howard Snell for the Desford Colliery Band and first performed by them in Gillingham, Dorset, England in September 1986.The 'Enigma' is a short snatch of a phrase taken from a well-known brass band test piece - a phrase which caught the imagination of the composer who took it as the basis of a sort of concerto for band with each section featured in turn. First the cornets have their turn, with a 'moto perpetuo', and they are followed by the horns and flugel whose variation is delicate and decorative. Trombones follow, each having there own tune in turn and then combining them together. Euphoniums and baritones have an expressive funeral march which is interrupted by percussion and basses who share a rhythmic, syncopated variation. A climax is reached and this is followed by a fugue (based on the theme) against which snatches of the preceding variations appear. The fugue heralds what turns out to be the theme on which all the variations are based, appearing in full at last, whose first five notes are derived from the 'enigma' theme. The piece ends with an emphatic final statement by the timpani.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £29.95

    Variations on an Enigma - Score Only - Philip Sparke

    Variations on an Enigma was commissioned by Howard Snell for the Desford Colliery Band and first performed by them in Gillingham, Dorset, England in September 1986.The 'Enigma' is a short snatch of a phrase taken from a well-known brass band test piece - a phrase which caught the imagination of the composer who took it as the basis of a sort of concerto for band with each section featured in turn. First the cornets have their turn, with a 'moto perpetuo', and they are followed by the horns and flugel whose variation is delicate and decorative. Trombones follow, each having there own tune in turn and then combining them together. Euphoniums and baritones have an expressive funeral march which is interrupted by percussion and basses who share a rhythmic, syncopated variation. A climax is reached and this is followed by a fugue (based on the theme) against which snatches of the preceding variations appear. The fugue heralds what turns out to be the theme on which all the variations are based, appearing in full at last, whose first five notes are derived from the 'enigma' theme. The piece ends with an emphatic final statement by the timpani.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days